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Salzburg (Austria)

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      08.10.2014 23:01
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      Very pretty clean city

      (Travel is something I do quite frequently but I dont have much experience reviewing it so any comments welcomed )

      **So why Salzburg?**
      Salzburg is not somewhere that is probaily that high on anyones must visit list but after deciding to visit Zurick i thought it would be good to visit a few areas that were relatively close/easy to get to from one another and was mainstream enough that I would be able to get a flight back from as well. I picked this not because of the mozart connection but because i am a big sound of music fan (not that i ended up doing anything sound of music connected but oh well)

      Value for money
      Like many major cities Salzburg offer a city pass which lasts for 24,48 or 72 hours from when you start to use. This offers free public transport and one entry per card into a range of attractions. They also offer money off further attractions that are not free. I think these offer great value for money as you only need to visit 2/3 attractions per day to have made your money on them,

      Sightseeing
      There are loads of things to do in salzburg from the ordinary to visiting the zoo ( saying that i have never really understood visiting a zoo on holiday)boat trips to the slightly more unusual like taking the funicular railway to the castle or a cable cart to the fortress.visiting museums etc.

      I dont have children so i cant really comment on how child friendly the place is but by what they offer i think that there is plenty to keep the children busy.

      Shopping
      I didnt do that much shopping but they had a good mix of cheap and not so cheap shops. I thought prices were average

      Getting around
      Not everything is dead close to each other but the fantastic bus service makes it really easy to get a round

      Nightlife
      Again not something I have much experience with.

      The weather
      Very much like the UK but i still managed to get burnt (beginning october)


      Overall a nice place to visit but i wont visit again as i feel i covered everything in the one trip. Everything was very 9-5 which i think would have been better if things had better opening hours but saying that i went out of season .

      For the attractions i visited i will do longer reviews with pictures xx

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      13.04.2013 18:08
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      Great for 3 days.

      I travelled to Salzburg with EasyJet with my partner. We stayed at the Hotel Am Mirabellplatz which was just across the river from the old town. A very safe feeling to walk around at night in the centre of town and near our hotel.

      To get to the centre from the airport you just have to take a bus which is free if you buy the Salzburg card at the tourist office at the airport. The card costs 36 Euros for 72 hours as we were there for 3 nights, and starts when you first swipe it. We managed to see the palace outside the city where the sound of music was filmed at the pavillion, go on a boat tour down the river, get on all buses for free, go in the cathedral, the state rooms, go up the funicular to the fortress, and loads of other little museums and things we wouldnt have normally done. My favourite was going to Mozarts birthplace and his fathers first house in Salzburg.

      I also managed to see a concert for free as my partner felt tired that evening. A lady came up to me and gave me a flyer for a free concert just down the road from the hotel. It was a choir singing lots of Mozart and was brilliant as the advertised concerts at the fortress cost around 50euro each!

      The centre of town is very compact and its impossible to get lost, there are loads of little cafes and restaurants which are quite expensive selling everything from pizza to traditional Austrian food. We ate on our side of the river as it was a lot cheaper for the same type of food, and there seemed to be more locals in the restaurants and bars where we were.

      There are loads of hotels everywhere in Salzburg, I booked ours through expedia and hotels.com and it was very easy to find the cheapest one nearest to town. A lot of the hotels also have restaurants attached.

      3 days was enough to see pretty much everything in the town centre and one day trip out for an afternoon. If you want to go to the local mountain and go up in a cable car you may need more time. We couldnt do this as it was shut for maintenance the week we were there. Its a great destination for a short break, and the best thing to do for us was to fly to Salzburg, then get a train to Vienna.

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        27.12.2011 21:28
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        The Stunning City Of Salzburg

        I stayed in Salzburg for a week in January 2007.

        Getting there
        I booked my flights with Ryanair through the website which I found fairly easy to use. Baring in mind I actually booked the tickets in July 2006 so that prices may have changed since then, but I paid £87.02 for both of us for return flight which I thought was very reasonable. We flew from London Stansted and the flight took an hour and forty minutes.

        Accommodation
        We stayed at Hotel Plainbrucke which is located about 15 minute drive from the airport and a ten minute bus journey from the main town. When I was looking to book a hotel online there were lots to choose from so I can't see anyone having a problem trying to locate somewhere to stay. I chose Hotel Plainbrucke as it looked to be fairly near to the town and also the photos on the website looked nice. When we arrived at the hotel, I wasn't entirely sure what to expect, as to be honest, from the outside, it looked like a tacky B&B as the building was bright orange and looked quite small. However, this proved that you should never judge a book by its cover as once inside, the hotel was lovely. Nice spacious reception, lovely rooms and extremely helpful staff.
        I searched for a hotel through Google and I was bombarded with hundreds of hotels to choose from so if you are planning a trip, I would advise you to do the same thing.

        Time Difference
        Salzburg in Austria is only 1 hour ahead of GMT so jet lag was not a problem.

        Currency
        The currency in Austria is the Euro.

        Getting Around Salzburg
        I have travelled to quite a few places and I have never come across a better transport system than the one in Austria. Although taxis are available I would not recommend this method of transport to people although we did get a taxi from the airport to our hotel when we arrived and encountered no problems. I would advise everyone to use the local 'tram' system. We were advised of the various routes by the receptionist at out hotel so basically we had to get one bus into town and another bus back to the hotel. Every tram on every route around town runs every 10 minutes and not once in the five days we were there was a tram late. The system is extremely easy to work out as there are timetables behind glass screens at every bus stop which are very easy to decipher, even though they were not in English.
        On a couple of the trips we did, we had to go further out of town, on about a 30 minute tram journey. The trams that ran the longer routes for the out of town journeys ran every 30 minutes but again, any tram you wanted to use could be found on the timetable and you can locate what times they run very easily.
        Our hotel (which was classed as a 3 star but seemed much better) cost us 316 euros for 5 nights.

        The Salzburg Card
        This is an excellent invention. When we checked into out hotel, the reception informed us of something called a 'Salzburg Card'. These cards can be bought for a 24 hour period, 48 hours and 72 hours but unfortunately not any longer. The Salzburg Card allows you to use any of the trams free of charge. An added bonus to these cards is that they also give you free entry into many of Salzburg's main attractions. Most of the attractions are free to get into with this card, a few are not but the Salzburg card gives you a discount on the entry fee. The charges for the Salzburg Card are as follows:

        24 hours - 21 euros
        48 hours - 29 euros
        72 hours - 34 euros

        We made more than our money's worth back with these cards as we visited roughly five tourist attractions which on average cost around 8 euros for entry. So to sum it up, for 34 euros (we got the 72 hour card) we got free travel for three days as well as free entry into most of the main attractions and discounted entry into the more expensive attractions.

        Eating Out
        My only disappointment with Salzburg was eating out. I found there wasn't a very wide selection of restaurants and that they tended to close fairly early. For example, one night we went out for dinner around 9pm, only to find that hardly any restaurants were open and we eventually had to grab something to eat at McDonalds which didn't make us feel like we were taking in much of the culture.
        Being vegetarian I found there was a great lack of veggie dishes which was disappointing.
        The restaurants we did find had fairly reasonably priced menus. On average a starter ranged from 2 euros - 5 euros, a main meal costing between 10 euros - 25 euros and a dessert costing between 5 euros - 10 euros.

        Only eating out for a main meal in the evening was a problem, during the day there was a lot more variety of food to choose from.

        There were many cafes which obviously served tea, coffee etc along with pastries such as croissants, Danish pastries, strudel and other cakes like doughnuts and big home cooked sponge cakes. Most of the cafes also served snack items such as toasted sandwiches, chips, omelettes and cheese dumplings. The Austrians must be fans of cheese dumplings as they were literally on every menu we saw.
        We also noticed quite a few Italian restaurants but again these closed fairly early, around 7pm. We had possibly the best pizza we have ever eaten in a little Italian we found in the main high street and it was only 7 euros for each 9 inch pizza which was extremely reasonable.
        Another problem was that the menus were all in Austrian so obviously we were unable to tell what was in each dish but we found if we asked inside the restaurant then there were able to provide us with an English menu but then we felt rude walking back out if there was nothing on the menu we fancied.

        The City Of Salzburg
        There are many tourist attractions in Salzburg, certainly enough to keep you busy. The town is fairly large with lots of shops ranging from shoe shops to little traditional shops selling old style Austrian clothing. We found that many of the shops were designer shops so the goods were fairly expensive. For example, I was looking to buy a new bag and saw a one I liked, however, when I looked at the price tag, I was amazed to discover that it cost over £300! So obviously I didn't get my new bag! As mentioned the town is fairly large and spread over a wide area but as there are regular bus stops, you can choose where to get off so do not have to walk if you don't wish to. I must admit, we do quite a bit of walking but we literally went to bed every night shattered from all the walking during the day.
        There is a large river running through the middle of Salzburg, on one side there is 'New Town' and the other side is called 'Old Town'. There are several bridges running from one side to the other so it is very easy to explore both sides.
        I think the town is very quaint and pretty with little cobbled streets running between different roads.

        Nightlife
        Salzburg is fairly quiet at night time which personally I found quite nice, no drunks running round the streets making noise! There were a few bars in town as well as out of town that served coffee and tea etc as well as alcoholic drinks. We did not notice any nightclubs although in all honesty, we did not look for any either. The atmosphere in the pubs / bars in the evening was relaxed with people just sitting round and talking quiety over their drinks and soft background music which you could easily talk over the top of.

        Things To Do In Salzburg

        Mozarts Residence
        For those of you who don't know, Salzburg is the City in which Mozart was born so there are lots of Mozart attractions to be seen. We went to see the Mozart Residence which was where Mozart was born and where he and his family lived until he was 7. Mozarts Residence is in the middle of one of the main streets in town and could easily be found on a local map which were available everywhere. Personally we didn't particularly enjoy this trip; you are just left to walk around the house and given a sheet which detailed various objects in the room and paintings etc. It was interesting to see the house itself but really I found this trip quite boring and there was nothing very exciting to see. The most exciting this was a letter that Mozart's Dad had written to his Mum informing her of Mozart's success. Apart from that, it was basically just lots of paintings of Mozart painted by various artists. Personally, I am not Mozart's biggest fan but being interested in history I thought it would be worth a look but I can't imagine this trip pleasing even Mozart's greatest fan although there were a couple of items that were interesting. This attraction was free to get into with the Salzburg Card.

        Museum Of Natural History
        The Museum of Natural History is located about a 5 minute walk from the main town and was fairly easy to locate after reading the map. I really enjoyed this attraction. Inside, there was a fascinating Aquarium with tropical and marine fish in beautiful big tanks, a reptile zoo with animals such as snakes, lizards and a couple of big crocodiles, again all in lovely big tanks.
        There was a dinosaur sections with the usual skeletons of dinosaurs and a life size T Rex which moves and roars! There was a Space Discovery section all about our solar system. There was a Rock Crystal section with lots of specimens on show. Finally there was a 'Journey through the human body' section.
        On the top floor there were lots of stuffed animals from hundreds of years ago and also more popular animals such as the polar bear, lion, tiger etc as well as a large range of birds.
        My only complaint was that all the signs were in Austrian so obviously we were unable to read any of the information which would have been useful in certain sections, but we felt we couldn't really complain as we were in Austria after all. This attraction was also free to get into with the Salzburg Card.

        Salzburg Zoo
        Being animal lovers, we had to visit to Zoo. The Zoo was about a 20 minute tram journey out of town which we could use our Salzburg card to travel on so we didn't have to pay any extra costs for the journey.

        The Zoo consists of over 500 animals (140 species). A star attraction were the free flying griffon vultures. The Zoo was built with mountains behind it and the vultures are free to fly wherever they please which was quite nice (although I have no idea why they stay at the Zoo when they are free to fly wherever they like). Quite often while we were walking around the Zoo we saw the vultures fly overhead and land on the side of the mountain.

        Each species had a large natural looking enclosure and they had animals such as wolves, big cats, rhinos, camels, giraffes, racoons etc - the list goes on!

        One thing I particularly liked about this Zoo was how close you were allowed to get to some of the animals (obviously not the big cats!). In one section, we walked into a room and were greeted by lots of little monkeys (unfortunately I can not tell you what they were as again the signs were in Austrian). The monkeys had lots of branches that were hung around the room and there was a section where you could sit on a bench and the monkeys are literally a foot away from you and you can watch them interact with each other in a natural environment.

        The Zoo is well advertised throughout the city on billboards etc but the Zoo itself was not the easiest place to find. We only managed to get off the bus in the correct place as my boyfriend noticed the small sign outside the zoo as we had previously looked on a map before jumping on the tram so we had a rough idea of where to get off. This attraction was free to get into with the Salzburg Card.

        Salzburgwerk Berchtesgaden (Salt Mines)
        The Salt Mines are located about a 30 minute bus journey out of town. We managed to get on the bus free of charge as we were never asked to pay but I am not sure this journey was included in the Salzburg Card deal. We managed to get there and back free of charge though.
        The Salt Mines were a fairly educational trip where we discovered traditional and modern mining methods on a guided tour around the mines. We went into the Salt Mines on a train similar to a train that original miners would have used hundreds of years ago. We went 700 metres below ground, deep inside the mountain where we could see the salt glistening in the rock around us. Upon arrival, we were given traditional mining clothes to wear which was quite funny as I had to wear these huge baggy trousers and a large blue jacket, as well as a leather bum pouch thing! - Very fetching! We also got to ride an original miner's shoot which was basically a wooden slide which you sat on and rode down further into the mine! I assume this is why we were given the leather bum pouch otherwise you would have ended up with friction burns on your bum from the slide! We also got to ride on a raft across the salt lake which was deep inside the mountain, and even got to taste the salty water!! Unfortunately we were not allowed to take any photos while we were inside but I assume this is because you have you photo taken several times throughout the trip and can buy the photos afterwards for either 4 euros each or 3 photos for 10 euros. We had our photo taken on the train, on the slide and again on the train while it was moving.
        The trip would be great fun for people of all ages, as well as being good fun, it was also very educational and interesting looking at the traditional methods of mining compared to the modern ways. This mine is still used today!
        This trip cost us 11.90 euros each for entry but this was with the discount we got for having the Salzburg Card.

        Cable Car Untersberg
        Here, we were able to take a Cable Car up to the top of Untersburg Mountain. The cable cars ran every 30 minutes and took you up to heights on 1853 metres. Once you arrive at the top, you are left to your own devices and are free to catch whichever cable car you want to back down to the ground.
        There is a small restaurant and viewing area once you step out from the cable car but for those of you who are more adventurous you are able to climb to the very highest point of the mountain using a 'path' that is marked out with large poles. I say 'path' because not many people seemed to do this so the path was not as safe as it could have been and in places we were falling up to our thighs in deep snow. Personally we found this great fun but it is definitely something to bear in mind for the elderly or people who may be afraid of falling over. We both fell over and into holes many times and came back with a few bruises!

        The highest point of the mountain is marked with a cross so we chose what looked like the best path and eventually made it to the cross. The views were absolutely breath taking, you are surrounded my mountains (and clouds) on one side and can see the whole City of Salzburg on the other. Definitely need to take a camera if you do this trip as there are some real photo opportunities.
        We were advised to wrap up warm for this trip as obviously it gets quite cold at the top of the mountain but to be honest, with all the trekking we did, we ended up carrying most of our layers and walking round in T shirts as we got very hot!
        Out of all the trips we did, I would recommend this one the most as the views really were out of this world.

        Summary
        Although we went in winter, we were greeted by sunny, fair weather and only had one day of rain out of the 5 we were there. The city of Salzburg is beautiful and there are plenty of tourist hotspots for people to visit. As already mentioned, the transport system was the best I have ever come across so getting around was extremely easy and very cheap with the Salzburg Card. I should imagine that Salzburg would be even more beautiful in the summer.

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          16.10.2011 09:03
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          Austria's Disney-city

          One of the great things about having a place in Slovenia is its position in the heart of central Europe; this gives us the opportunity to explore the neighbouring countries and in September 2011 we had planned to include a few days in Austria as part of our itinerary. Salzburg was not especially high on my travel wish list but it made a convenient stopping point on our journey from Prague to Bad Mitterndorf, where we'd be spending a few days in the Austrian Alps before heading to Slovenia, and it was clear that there would be plenty to see and do over the two days we planned to spend there.

          Salzburg does have its own airport but we chose to fly first to Prague as we have direct flights from Newcastle, and then travelled by train - a lovely journey through some beautiful countryside - to Salzburg. Alternatively you could fly to Linz and pick up the train there. The city is rather compact and most sights can be accessed on foot. If you want to go a little further out you can use the excellent bus and tram service; tickets can be bought from the driver but cost slightly more than if you buy them in advance at a Trafik shop (of which there are plenty dotted around).

          The first thing we noticed was that Salzburg is a city of tour groups. I'm sure that there are plenty of independent tourists but everywhere you go there are groups of people following severe looking ladies in dirndls, or gazing blankly at some building or other as their commentary is fed into an earpiece. Then there are touts trying to get you to sign up for a Sound of Music themed tour, or to take a trip to a salt mine; art classes perched on their folding stools sketching a view of one of the squares; snaking lines of Japanese sightseers fumbling with over-sized cameras as they tried to keep up with their guide. As a casual tourist it soon becomes quite wearing when you have to wait until everyone in a tour group has had umpteen photographs taken in front of any given building or sight, or when buying a ticket to an attraction takes an inordinately long time due to the inability of Americans to notice that the information is already presented in English if only they'd be just a little bit observant.

          Salzburg made me cranky; I cannot tell a lie. It is undeniably beautiful: cool, shady squares, a city of elegant church towers, handsome town houses, eye catching shop windows and all of this against the backdrop of the Austrian Alps, but at the busiest times of day its beauty is obscured by the crowds of noisy tourists. The time to enjoy it at its best is the beginning of the day or early evening when the coach tourists have left for the day or those staying in the city are at their hotels dressing for dinner or maybe attending an early evening concert. If you don't want to go into the paid for attractions and are happy just strolling the narrow lanes then these are the best times to be out and about.

          It's impossible to escape the Mozart connection: you can visit both the house he was born in and the one he later lived in. All the souvenir stalls and shops sell Mozart chocolates and liqueurs, miniature violins bearing the composer's face, in fact any kind of article - mugs, t-shirts, clocks, letter racks - bearing a cheap transfer of his powdered pouting face. Then there are the items made of salt - the substance that contributed to half of the city's name which translates as "salt castle". There are three salt mines in the area, all of which are open as tourist attractions and you'll see plenty of places advertising day trips.

          The Sound of Music connection is another big money spinner for Salzburg. There are all kinds of tours offered that are linked to the movie and its locations. You can see the sights on a bicycle tour while singing songs from the show if you aren't too out of breath, go round on foot or enjoy the comfort of an air conditioned coach - the latter has the advantage of taking you out of the city to the alpine meadows where Julie Andrews famously belted out the show's title number. Walking from our hotel to the city centre on our first day in Salzburg we were amazed to see no less than ten minibuses offering the Sound of Music tour parked across the road from Schloss Mirabell (remember the scene where Maria and the kids are dancing round the fountain and the statue of the unicorn? - that's Schloss Mirabell.) There's even a restaurant where you can eat dinner while the band and a cast of singers perform the songs from the show: himself must have felt a bit guilty about refusing to do a Sound of Music tour because he did say that he'd eat at that restaurant if I really wanted to go there - I didn't but was touched by the reluctantly made offer. In fact you can see most of the locations used in the film independently and I was thrilled to see the altar in the cathedral where Maria married Captain Von Trapp. Even if you have no interest in the movie its worth going into the cathedral to see the magnificent painted dome and ceiling.

          The stern looking Festung Hohensalzburg fortress surveys the city from its position above the rooftops. A funicular will take you there or you can walk. On our first day we proposed to take the funicular just for the ride (himself collects funicular rides) and would consider walking up the following day to see the castle interior. However you can only buy a combined ticket for the funicular and castle, you can't use the funicular on its own so we decided to talk half way instead and have a drink on the terrace of the restaurant from where you can still catch some pretty wonderful views.

          We were full of good intentions for Salzburg expecting to squeeze in as much culture as we could in the day and a half and two evenings we'd be there. There are plenty of museums and galleries but none really appealed on that particular day. I might have visited one of the Mozart houses but Himself was not so keen and besides, the weather was really too nice to spend much time indoors. A disproportionate amount of Saturday, our only full day in the city, was spent in the pursuit and imbibing of beer but not before we assuaged our guilt over our plans for the day by climbing the Kapuzinerberg and walking the ramparts. This is the best place to get some snaps of the city with the mountains in the background. The easiest way to get up to the viewpoint beside the monastery is to follow the signs from Linzergasse and while this is fairly steep it's easy underfoot. However the view is limited and to be able to get a more panoramic view you need to move furtheralong the ramparts; this requires sturdy footwear and a great deal of energy as this entails lots of steps and uneven up and down paths. It was certainly worth the exertion on that hot Saturday morning, though, not just for the fantastic views but also because we were able to get very close to an inquisitive and seemingly fearless squirrel.

          After that it seemed only right to quench our first but first we had to do the educational bit. We jumped on a bus and set off for Stiegl Brauwelt. The company has a long history of beer making in Salzburg; there are several Stiegl bierkellers in the city but at this out of town site you can take a self-guided tour and learn about how beer is made and the history of Stiegl. The admission price includes a free gift and three beers to try. If you don't want to take the tour you can still go to Brauwelt and have lunch or dinner or just try the beers. We loved it but better was to come as we set off for our next stop on the Salzburg beer trail, the Augustiner brewery at Mulln.

          As you might guess from the name, this brewery started as one attached to a monastery and is now a large enterprise with its beers sold in many locations in the area. The main building houses a couple of traditional beer halls and a little indoor market hall with separate stalls selling cheese, cooked meats and breads that drinkers take along to the beer hall or outside to the gardens if the weather permits, to have with their beer. On the day we visited the sun was shining and the huge garden was full of people of all ages enjoying a stein of beer (or two).

          Salzburg is a bit like an overgrown Disney scene. It's incredibly pretty but it's also very twee. As in many parts of Austria (and southern Germany) you'll see people (young people as well as older ones) wearing the traditional Tracht, lederhosen and knee length socks for the men, dirndls for the ladies, without a jot of irony. (I often wonder whether people from Austria coming to Newcastle will assume the national dress to be tracksuit, Burberry cap and snide Helly Hansen coat) Salzburg is full of shops selling these traditional costumes and you might think it's just for wealthy tourists and tour guides to outfit themselves but there's actually a very popular style called the Landhausmode which has been inspired by the traditional dress; personally I rather like it and long to own a dirndl (there were some on sale in the Spar in the mountain village we later stayed at and I was very tempted but resolved to wait and buy something better quality) - I think it would suit me!

          It's easy to spend your money in Salzburg. Not only is it not cheap but there are so many opportunities to be parted with your cash: carriage rides, souvenir shops, gooey cakes, chocolates, buskers, segue tours and boat rides. And that's before you've bought dinner. As you'd expect from a city that attracts so many foreign visitors the restaurant scene is varied and you can find most cuisines. There are plenty of chances to sample Austrian cuisine, though, and as there is so much competition menus are generally posted outside the premises so you can have a look at what's on offer before you make your mind up. Accommodation can be costly and we couldn't find hostel accommodation within a reasonable distance of the centre. If you're just visiting for a weekend it might be most economic to book a city break package.

          I've avoided listing the most frequently visited attractions but I do know that most attract an entrance charge. If you think you'll be visiting a lot of these it would be sensible to look into one of the various cards offered by the Tourist Office.

          I think I can safely cross Salzburg off my list. My curiosity has been satisfied and I don't think I'll have a burning desire to return just to visit the places I didn't make the effort to see this time. However, as Austrian airports make a good point from which to access Slovenia I wouldn't rule out going back at some point. If my itinerary demands it I know that I'll be happy enough to spend an afternoon and night there with some great beer, good food and very lovely views.

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            01.03.2007 12:23
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            This truely is one of the most beautiful places in the world

            I have been to Salzburg 3 times, all in December. The first 2 times I went was with my Secondary School on ski trips in Schladming which is about a 20 minute drive from Salzburg I think. Austria is an excellent place to ski; the views from the mountains are just amazing. I skied down the Planai hundreds of times which are, if I remember correctly the highest or steepest down hill slope in the world (that you can ski down); please correct me if I am wrong. There is a small bar/restaurant at the top which I have eaten and drank in many times before flying down the slopes. The food in Austria is very different but also very tasty and the drinks are very strong, hehehe!!

            Each time I have been I have shopped in Salzburg. I don't know what it is like at other times of the year but in December it is very beautiful, especially if it is or has been snowing.

            I saw where Mozart was born; although I have never really taken an interest in Mozart I found it very interesting reading about him and his life.

            I also went to the place where 'The Sound of Music' was filmed. I had never seen the musical but seeing where it was filmed made me watch it, I love it!!!

            I went to the top of a place either in or called Dachstein, its 3,000 ml high, about -10degrees at the top but so so beautiful.

            I visited other places in Salzburg but I can't remember the names or exact places, all still very beautiful though, especially the castles.

            I have only been able to attach a couple of pictures as the others are too large to upload, shame as there are some reallly lovely ones.

            I hope you enjoyed this short read.

            I strongly recommend visits to Salzburg.
            In Fact, I think the whole of Austria is 100% worth visiting; I would absolutely love to go back to Austria any day!

            Thanks xxx

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              30.08.2001 14:30
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              Salzburg, literally salt castle. Quite a step away from the sand castles I grew up with in Blackpool. We went there last month, and since my op on the Salt mines has now been moved to a different category, I’m now free to write one on the town itself. What to see ************** Salzburg is a great little place, with the emphasis on the little. It’s wonderfully compact which means you can walk everywhere – no shelling out for taxis or busses. There is a lot to see and do. The fortress itself was “geil” and the funicular railway (the oldest in Europe) which takes you up to the top even more so. From there you can get an amazing view of the city. We found a large model cow just standing there, but when we read what was written on it the mystery was explained. You see, many years ago, the people of Salzburg were fighting some other people (who, I cannot entirely remember). To try and scare their opponents they dragged their last remaining cow over to the edge of the fortress for all to see. The next night, they painted the poor thing, and paraded it again. Their opponents, thinking they had more food supplies than they themselves did (after all, 2 whole cows is a lot), gave up the fight and retreated back to whence they came. The theatre is pretty funky too. You can go on tours (in English and German) which tell you some of the history of the place, and interesting facts like how in winter they open the roof up as it would not be able to withstand the pressure of the snow. Mozart was born in this town and you can visit both his houses – the one where he made his appearance into the world and the one where he lived – along with hundreds of American tourists if you really want to. There are numerous museums including an art gallery (where there may, or may not, be a Klimt – long story), a natural history museum (tons of dead animals and a few hands-on exhibitions) a
              nd a toy museum (which was nice although it had a rather disappointing shop) Numerous churches and cathedrals with some wonderful architecture and art work. Especially good are the Universitäts Kirche and the main Dom. For more info, visit the tourist office (round the corner from the Cathedral) or check out the websites below. What to buy ************ Mozart’s face is as celebrated here as throughout the country so the marzipan filled Kügeln are all over. Apart from that, embroidered items and china / glass thingies are a good buy, and if you’re purse strings don’t stretch that far there’s always the standard tacky souvenirs. Light-up flashing model of Jesus anyone? Be warned, the shops around the main monuments were extortionate – even if you were just buying those tacky little souvenirs. Head across the river for more affordable places. Where to Eat ************ You’ll be spoilt for choice here – there’s everything on offer from Italian and Chinese through to Greek and typical Austrian fare. There is a McD’s if you insist but for once we didn’t try it. Try the other side of the river (ie not near the fortress and tourist office) for cheaper, less touristy places. Where to stay ************* There are places to suit all budgets from youth hostels (Yo ho ho, eh Scott?) through to magnificent 5* affairs. For best results check out http://salzburg.nethotels.com/ where you can not only search through a wide selection of places (by date / price / rating etc) but also book online. Getting there ************** Fly from the UK to Salzburg International Airport not far from the centre. Once on the continent, trains and busses run regularly from capitals and other major cities including Vienna (every 2 hours or so, taking 3 hours – not nearly a whole day as Bil
              l Bryson seems to think). Websites worth looking at ***************************** And before you ask, they’re all in English...... http://www.salzburg.gv.at/dasistsalzburg/englisch/ http://www.salzburginfo.at/desk/frame_home_e.htm http://www.salzburg.com/holiday/index_e.html Negative points? ***************** This town cannot apostrophise! No joke. Unless I have got severely muddled, “spagheitti’s”, “hotel’s” and “shop’s” for plurals are all wrong wrong wrong! We went in mid summer and there were a lot of tourists – many are American and LOUD. Being able to speak German, though, was great since people were a lot nicer to us as a result. Verdict ******* We had a great time, although an extra day would have been nice. It’s a place well worth visiting – in my opinion more so than Vienna as it’s so gorgeous – all green and lovely and not city like at all. I hope this has been useful in showing you that contrary to certain dooyoo members’ opinions, it is possible to have fun in this city whilst avoiding the Sound Of Music tour....

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                27.08.2001 18:15
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                I travelled to Salzburg in June last year - I didn't know much about this Baroque city and I couldn't have claimed to have seen 'The Sound of Music' before my expedition - maybe this was a good thing, who knows? It is a facinating city - the architecture is breathtaking and so are the views. I can't remember any litter either - something which made it more fantastic. The gift shops have a lot of Mozart themed goods and the usual tourist orientated things, we can be quite expensive. The streets are an attraction in their own right, and a trip on a horsedrawn carriage is a must to appreciate the city. There are many tours around the city, the most popular (I believe) are of 'The Sound of Music' variety.I'm not a fan of the Rogers and Hammerstein classic or Mozart - but I still enjoyed the city nevertheless. It is definitely worth a day or more just exploring the city and taking in the sights and sounds of this fascinating city. A real gem!

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                  31.07.2001 20:38
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                  We actually wanted to go to Venice last weekend but ended up some how in Salzburg. For that turn of events I am very glad because I had a grand time. The reason why we could not go to Venice was because we were told that it was impossible to get accomodation at this time of year. We had almost as many problems though with Salzburg because of the Festspielen, an annual theatrical event held in the city, started this last weekend. We arrived by train from Vienna and after a quick nip into the tourist Info (chocablock with Americans) quickly found our way to our Privat Zimmer (like a B&B) by bus (single tickets cost 22ATS and day tickets 40ATS). The bus route took us through the centre so we were able to get a quick glance at what was to be our new home town, well, for the next 48 hours anyway. Salzburg is situated on the Salzach river and can be reached by train from the capital of Austria, Vienna in about three and a half hours. Most visitors come via the Tirol or Germany as it is situated close to the border. My first thoughts as we passed through were "oooo, its very green!" (I like greenery, I grew up in the coutryside) and also how compact everything was. Surrounded by hills, the town is looked over by the Hohensalzburg, Cnetral Europe´s largest fortress and straddles the river on either side. It was very picturesque to say the least. Our room was in a house in the suburbs and we were met by a friendly lady as we walked up the drive. Although we shared a bathroom with the other guests, it was spotlessly clean (infact Zoe commented that if the bathrooms were like that at her university, a lot of people would be a lot happier!) and also very good value (500ATS per night). we dumped our bags and headed off for a wander around the centre. Actually, we wanted to go to the cinema (don´t scoff), but the first one we found seemed to only show soft porn and the second was closed. In the end we settled for a meal and quick trip to the
                  internet cafe (to check DooYoo, of course). There is one such cafe on Mozart Platz cunningly named "Internet Cafe" and Big Net just off Mozart Platz on Judengasse. There are numerous cafes and restaurants with -as is the norm- tables on the pavements, the prices differ a bit so there should be something to suit all budgets. Next day we did a LOT of sightseeing, we visited the Hohensalzburg, galleries, vantage points and museums. For 230 ATS we had purchased 24 hour Salzburg Cards, with this you get 24 hours travel and free or discounted entrance to over thirty sights and attractions in and around the city. Although you get free travel with the card we used that side of it very little, the main bit is very compact and almost every thing can be done on foot. To explain more about the benefits of this card would require a whole new Opinion. Therefore I wont go on too much except to say that you can go into a museum and if you don´t like it come out again without feeling guilty! Because you have not forked out the price of a ticket for that particular museum you can spend your valuable time elsewhere. Our train was at three the next afternoon so we took the advice of another friendly lady in the tourist information and spent the morning in a salt mine in Hallein, a town southwest of Salzburg. We took a train for about half an hour, then after a short walk , took a cable car up the mountain. The trip called The Salt Train, cost 289ATS and included the train fare, the cable car and a tour around the mines. The latter two together when paying seperately come to 280 Schillings so that meant that the train only cost 9ATS, which was nice. I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised, I had not expected it to be so entertaining. Most of the entertainment was had when we looked at ourselves in the mirror whilst wearing the mandatory, huge, thick, white trousers and jacket. All of us looked like we had escaped from somewhere dubious. The
                  tour took 90 minutes and it was conducted by a well informed guide who spoke in german and english. We were taken 300m into the mountainside on a small train (you had to straddle the seats and get cosy with whoever was infront of you.....) and then lead through tunnels, over an underground salt lake and best of all, down two wooden slides totalling 66m -hence the bizarre clothing. By the end of our weekend I could not have gone to one of the many The Sound Of Music tours or Mozart concerts on offer (they are everywhere) even if I had wanted to! I think we had 30 Schillings collectively between us. Nevertheless, I went back to Vienna happy but shattered. I think a long weekend was a suitable amount of time to spend in Salzburg, we had 48 hours there and managed to fit everything in that we wanted to do. Oh, except the cinema, but I am sure they can be found in other cities aswell. Even in Vienna.

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                    24.11.2000 03:14
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                    I visited Salzburg earlier this year and was extremely dissapointed. Sure, it's a great city if you're into Mozart and The Sound Of Music but if you're after a bit of fun this isn't the place to be. My visit wasn't helped by the hot, sticky weather which made the busy, narrow streets very uncomfortable and I may have enjoyed my visit more if I didn't spend the whole day dreaming of diving into a cool mountain lake. The City itself has lots of interesting architecture and plenty of museums to visit but the shops are just full of Mozart chocolates, like a classy version of Blackpool. The city has a lot to offer those who are interested in the life of Mozart and you can always tell a city of culture when the sign outside Mcdonalds is made of wrought iron. But if you're on a budget this is not the best city to visit, with hundreds of gift shops charging extortionate prices for things you can get for half price in a supermarket.

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                    27.07.2000 00:30
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                    If you can only choose a place to go in Austria, I would say go to Salzburg. I have been to three places in Austria including Salzburg, Vienna and Innsbruck. Vienna is a beautiful town but just another big city in Europe. Innsbruck good for outdoor activities such as hiking and skiing. But if you want to do sight seeing than Salzburg would be the best choice. A small and beautiful city surrounded by beautiful mountains and lakes. There's so many one day excursion you can take from there, because just a drive away from the city you can enjoy all the nature.. lakes and mountains exactly like the ones you see in the film 'The Sound of Music'. There's a castle in the middle of the city where from the top you can get a beautiful view of beautiful old buildings surrounded by peaceful and relaxing nature. Furthermore if you want to try some outdoor adventures like rafting and canyoning, there's also outfitters who will pick you up from Salzburg. All first timers are most welcome. What a better place to try all these adventures than a place of beauty in nature. Salzburg is a good place to anchor in Austria!

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                    09.07.2000 04:54
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                    I went on a 36-day tour of Europe last Summer, in July & August1999 with 7 good friends of mine. Salzburg was one of the destinations that was on our list. One thing for sure, everywhere you turn, you will see for yourself, the influence of Mozart, from tourist attractions to restaurants -and you'd even find ice-creams, chocolate bars and liqueurs named after this famous musician! If you intend to visit Salzburg, a must-see, in my opinion, is the Gebursthaus as well as the Wohnhaus. The former, is Mozart's birthplace, where he spent the first few years of his life..and is situated along a little street bustling with lots (& I mean LOTS!) of tourists, at Getreidegasse 9. I doubt if you'll ever miss this striking building, which is painted yellow...prob. the original colour when Mozart was living there during his childhood years (just my guess!). Wohnhaus, situated across the River SAlzach which runs across Salzburg, on the other hand, is Mozart's former residence, in his youth, which is at Makartplatz 8. This is perhaps, the better of the 2 attractions. The downside of these places, is the entrance fees (oh well.. don't think you can avoid that anywhere at all, but it is fair enough that they may need the funds for maintenance work, and for installing security systems). Entry is AS70 for Gebursthaus, and AS65 for Wohnhaus, but you can get a combined ticket for AS 110. OR if you are a person who has a lot of inclination to enter all the museums and tourist attractions in Salzburg, I would recommend the "Salzburg Card", which you can purchase at AS 200/270/360 for 24/48/72 hours validity, for free entry into museums, and public transport round the city. Not very far away from Gebursthaus (by my standards, that is), is the Residenz, at Residenzplatz 1, and the vast DOM, on Domplatz. The Residenz has a gallery of 16th Century and 17th century Dutch and Flemish artists, in addition to baroque state rooms The entry fee (it's a guide
                    d tour)costs AS 80. The DOM, is a cathedral with 3 bronze doors, which symbolises faith, hope and charity. Nearby the DOM, you will find St Peter's Abbey, whose graveyard contains catacombs. On the same side of the river as Wohnhaus, is the Schloss Mirabell, a palace, whose attractive gardens were featured in "The Sound of Music" ; here you can find lots of beautiful flower beds- if flowers appeal to you... If you are into tacky tours(ok, I DON't have a right to have an opinion on this, as I didn't go on it, but a couple of my friends did), you might want to try the Sound of Music Tour for AS350, which lasts 3-4 hours...

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                    06.07.2000 07:08
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                    The mention of Salzburg often reminds people of the Academy-Award-winning film - The Sound of Music. Indeed, with The Sound of Music, Salzburg may not be what it is today. The fact is, Salzburg is more than "The Sound of Music" town. To those who loves musics, they certainly do know that Salzburg is also a birth place of great musician, Mozart. Places of interest include Mozart's Geburtshaus (Birthplace) amd Wohnhaus (Residence) A place that you must not miss visiting is the Schloss Mirabell, which its garden featured in the Sound of Music. Another place you must not miss is Festung Hohensalzburg, a fortress up the hill. It takes about 15 minutes to walk up the hill, but alternatively you can take Festungbahn (cable car) return for AS34 (about 2 pounds). From the hill you can see down a square where lies a gigantic chess grids. Normally 2 players will be playing chess at that grids, while the rest surround them as they battle. The square was also a popular site for peddlars selling souvenirs and food. These peddlars accepts both Aus Schillings and Deutch Marks.

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                  "Salzburg is the fourth-largest city in Austria and the capital of the federal state of Salzburg. Salzburg's "Old Town" with its world famous baroque architecture is one of the best-preserved city centers in the German-speaking world, and was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. The city is noted for its Alpine setting. It is the birthplace of Mozart and the setting for parts of the musical and film The Sound of Music. Salzburg is also a student city, with three universities. Salzburg is on the banks of the Salzach river, at the northern boundary of the Alps. The mountains to Salzburg's south contrast with the rolling plains to the north. The closest alpine peak – the 1972 m Untersberg – is only a few kilometers from the city center. The Altstadt, or "old town", is dominated by its baroque towers and churches and the massive Festung Hohensalzburg. This area is surrounded by two smaller mountains, the Mönchsberg and Kapuzinerberg as the green lung of the city. Salzburg is approximately 150km (93.75mi) east of Munich, Germany, and 300km (187.5mi) west of Vienna."