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    • More +
      08.11.2010 12:53
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      Well worth one visit.

      With the scorching late summer sun beating down on the car we set off for Tombstone- "The Town Too Tough To Die!" Southern Arizona is the setting for this town, which for me was a place where history and imagination marry together to create a most incredible scene. "Cowboy chaos" was how I saw it, as we parked and walked to the main street of Tombstone, that Sunday morning in early September.

      It's a 70 mile drive from Tucson, and you will need a car to get there. The directions as given on the Tombstone website are:

      Take Interstate 10 East to Benson (about 40-45 miles). Exit South on Highway 80 which will take you straight to Tombstone.

      Parking was easy as there is plenty of space in the road which borders the main street.

      I wasn't sure what to expect. It was like the scene in a western movie, but as the town is also home to over 1500 residents, you have to remember that the scenes you see are also real as well as imaginary. Cowboys in big boots stomp the streets, ladies in Victorian costumes glide along the boardwalks, baskets in hand. Gunshots bang into the sky, and horse and carts trundle along the main street. Saloon bars line the streets with their swing doors, and trinket shops selling Tombstone souvenirs are littered about too. I found myself for some bizarre reason emulating my son's newly acquired US accent. It was the atmosphere that did it, and I was soon in fits of giggles as the scene was surreal, and denim clad cowboys said howdy to me at every corner!

      Tombstone was founded in 1879, and it was, in its day, a silver and gold mining town- prosperous and at the time - the county seat. More famous though in its history was that it was the setting for the site of the famous gunfight of the OK Corral. This battle took place between Wyatt Earp and his brothers and friends, who fought with the Clanton Outlaws and two of their supporters. The gunfight resulted in several dead, and of course the resulting historical event became a household name even a century on.

      Gunfights are re-enacted in the street at regular intervals during the day, affording tourists the chance to witness, first hand, the action as it would have happened. This is a treat and not to be missed, as loud shots boom through the air and everything gets nasty! It isn't all drama; there are also demonstrations of the fashion worn at the time, so ladies and cowboys parade in front of tourists in costumes pertaining to the era. This allows some wonderful photographic opportunities.

      The town of Tombstone took a tumble as an underground river flooded in 1887, and destroyed the silver mines and following this the population dwindled. The only notable events in its history after that was its role in the production of manganese for World War 1, and subsequently in World War 11 the city was to provide lead supplies. Following on from then the place has become a tourist attraction and over 400,000 flock there each year!

      There are many places to seek refuge from the street action, and restaurants to dine in are plentiful. We ate in The Longhorn restaurant, the oldest one in Tombstone, which was good. The food was cooked to order, very enjoyable and the service was superb. There were plenty of vegetarian choices for us, and the ambience within the restaurant was cosy, quiet and relaxing. They even made me an English tea!

      There are also many places of interest including the Birdcage Theatre, which runs tours both day and night. This place was frequented by prostitutes, and is said to be haunted. The courthouse is worth a look as it has historical details of Tombstone and even a set of gallows. There are many other places to discover, some free, some charge, but it is possible to soak up the atmosphere of Tombstone for free if you are on a budget, and just want to parade up and down the street. The feel of the place is so intense you could almost bottle it. As I write this review I can almost walk up the street as if I was actually there.

      Before leaving the area a visit to the graveyard outside the town called "The Boothill" is well worth a look. Here lie the remains of those folk who lived and died in Tombstone, many of whom were hanged for quite trivial reasons. My eyes were drawn to several of these,

      Van Houten
      ------------------
      Murdered, 1879
      He was beaten in the face with a stone until he died. Trouble was over his mining claim, which he had not recorded.

      Chas. Helm
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      Shot, 1882
      Shot by Wm. McCauley. Two hot-tempered ranchers, who disagreed over the best way to drive cattle, fast or slow.

      Peter Smith
      --------------
      Killed, 1882
      Smith, age 23, a native of Germany, was struck on the back of his head with a poker and killed by Thos. Donald (or Doland) during a fight.

      This was just the first row and it got worse! I am sure that life in this place in that century was a very turbulent and difficult existence. The fallout from the OK Corral fight also lies here. The views from this graveyard are stunning over the landscape hot and arid, but there is a lovely shaded area to sit and cool down, and in common with so many places in Arizona there is a free drinking fountain.

      Visiting Tombstone had worried me slightly because my personality and crowds are distinctly opposed, and I am more at home in an isolated spot, than I am in a bustling town. The place was noisy and vibrant, and very hot indeed, and so a couple of hours were enough for me to appreciate it, and to be given a glimpse of what life had been like in those very early years. The gun shots were loud, and I would think they would have frightened young children, although I saw many in their buggies on the boardwalk happily licking ice creams despite being in a war zone during the mock gun fights.

      My gran was born in 1894 and it made me think what life had been like across The Atlantic just prior to her era - incredible I am sure. Yes Tombstone is touristy, and yes it is to a certain extent living in the past, but there are few places to see the way life was in history so graphically. I think it is rather special, and I'm sure as I post this review, the sound of gunfire will soon be resounding over Tombstone, as another cowboy falls.

      http://www.cityoftombstone.com/

      http://www.tombstone.org/

      Boot Hill Graveyard & Gift Shop
      Open 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM, Daily
      (Except Christmas & New Year's Day)
      P. O. Box 731
      Tombstone, AZ 85638
      Phone: (520) 457-3300

      This review has now been published on Ciao with pictures under my user name Violet1278.

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      • More +
        08.12.2007 20:08
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        The town where the famous gunfight took place

        --------------------
        BACKGROUND
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        Located in the county of Cochise in Arizona, Tombstone is most famous for its role in 'wild west' history. The city was founded in 1879 and soon boomed as a mining community. Without railroad access Tombstone was very isolated and this led to a lawlessness which attracted many outlaw gangs. The most famous event in Tombstone was the 'Gunfight at the OK Corral' between the Clanton gang and city marshall Wyatt Earp and his group in October 1881. This event is reenacted every day at 2pm.

        By the mid-1880s the mines had been depleted and Tombstone became virtually deserted. However today it is thriving as a tourist destination with over 400,000 visitors each year, and is well worth a visit.

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        SOME REGULAR TOMBSTONE EVENTS
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        Events happen on a daily basis in Tombstone. As already mentioned there are reenactments of the Gunfight at the OK Corral, and plentiful opportunities for historical tours.

        In August is a weekend event called Vigilante Days. This features a variety of street entertainers, a chili cook-off and a fun run. A particularly fun feature is the opportunity to go on wagon rides.

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        PLACES TO VISIT
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        OK CORRAL
        Obviously this is a must-see place for any visit to Tombstone. It is worth noting however that the gunfight did not actually take place in the corral, as is often believed, but instead BEHIND it. There are historical plaques to show you where various parts of the gunfight itself took place.

        BOOT HILL CEMETARY
        Boot Hill Cemetary is one of the most famous cemetaries in the USA. It is the final resting place for many of those who died in Tombstone, both through violence and disease. Those who died in the OK Corral gunfight are buried here.

        HELLDORADO TOWN
        Helldorado Town is a small theme park in Tombstone featuring a comedy gunfight, shooting gallery and a mine shaft. It is particularly fun for any children you may have with you.

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        MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCES IN TOMBSTONE
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        I have only been to Tombstone once but very much enjoyed it. It is fun to visit somewhere that makes you feel like you have walked onto the set of a cliched wild west movie, but I wouldn't advise going there if you want to get a sense of what it was really like to live in Tombstone in the wild days of the west. It is pleasant to visit the places where the famous events took place, and learn more about how and why they happened, but it does feel very touristy, too much so in fact. However it is true that Tombstone as a town would have died by now if it wasn't for the tourists so that is the price we pay to preserve the history.

        If you are interested in the 'wild west' then Tombstone is worth a visit, but I wouldn't plan going for longer than a day trip.

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