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      24.08.2010 18:26
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      Great Place to visit

      Boscastle is a small fishing village situated in the South West of England. The village is on the North coast of the county of Cornwall. This little villages sits at the bottom of a narrow valley and has a lovely little harbour. The village only has a population of around nine hundred people but it gets much busier in the summer months when people come to visit the area. This part of Cornwall is very beautiful and there is some stunning coastline, for these reasons people have been visiting this part of the country for many years.

      Most people had never heard of Boscastle until it hit the headlines back in August of 2004. The little village saw some of Britain's worst ever flooding and many people lost their homes. The problem came when a heavy thunderstorm passed overhead and all the rain water plunged down the steep valley causing a flash flood in the town. There were 91 people rescued by helicopter in what was described as the biggest ever rescue of it's kind in Britain. Since the flooding much of the village has been rebuilt and measures have been put in place to make sure a similar tragedy does not occur.

      If you are planning on visiting Boscastle there is plenty to keep you entertained. The Witchcraft Museum is probably one of the most odd yet interesting museums you will ever visit. This museum has the largest collection of Witchcraft and Wiccan related articles in the world! There are some very interesting exhibits and this is one of the most popular museum is Cornwall. There is also a brilliant little pottery shop where you can watch the potter create some stunning pieces and also admire some he has already made. There is also a spectacular coastal walk from Boscastle to Tintagel that is really worth the effort. There is also a very good visitor centre which is ideal for giving you some ideas of what there is to do in the area.

      If you run out of things to do in Boscastle itself there are plenty of other places of interest nearby. Port Isaac is only a few miles away, this lovely little town is the setting for the popular TV show Doc Martin and there are some lovely shops and tea rooms here. If you head a little further there is the large resort town of Newquay which has some wonderful beaches and there is always plenty going on in the town itself. Another place worth visiting is the Eden Project, this is about half an hour away and really is an interesting day out.

      Although when people hear the name Boscastle all they think of is the terrible floods that struck the village, the place really does have plenty to offer visitors. This is such a lovely spot and there really is plenty to see and do in this area. Next time you are in Cornwall go and give the village of Boscastle a visit.

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        23.05.2009 23:20
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        Beautiful unspoilt fishing village

        I have visited Boscastle twice, Once for the day a few months before the major flood and the second time we stayed there for a week in a cottage on an extremely steep hill!

        Boscastle is beautiful and unspoilt. There isn't a great deal to do but it really doesn't matter as you will be occupied just taking in your surroundings. The natural harbour is simply beautiful and if you are feeling athletic you can take a walk up the mildly rocky path to take in the awesome view of the green waters below, crashing against the rocky cliffs.

        There is a few craft type shops, a leather shop, a couple of pubs serving fantastic local cuisine. There is also a witchcraft museum which is charmingly cornish. They even leave broom sticks for you to borrow at your leisure! I find this museum fascinating as it is full of tales about local withcraft and has many objects which have been used for witchcraft over the years.

        I think the thing I remember the most about arriving at Boscastle is that you travel into the valley on a extremely windy, steep hill and you really just cant see the place you feel like you are in the middle of nowhere but as you turn the last bend you suddenly see this beautiful village surrounded by steep hills and a stream taking water from the valley to the majestic green sea.

        If you enjoy beautiful scenery and don't need the hustle and bustle of the city then you really must visit Boscastle which is situated on the North Coast of Cornwall, near other picturesque villages such as Tintagel.

        acommodation ranges from bed and breakfast to hotels to holiday cottages. Prices range fron £250 - £1000 depending on type of acommodation and time of year.

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        02.05.2009 16:33

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        Watch your change in the little supermarket by car park!

        Among the many lovely shops,we thoroughly recommend the Art shop & Rocky Road Gallery - excellent service and a large range of novelty and art & craft items, difficult to know which to choose!
        And well done to the friendly and efficient Harbour Light Tea Rooms, newly opened in the cottage on the site of the old 13th Century pixie house which was washed away. They deserve every success.
        And the same goes for the thriving Museum of Witchcraft, glad to see it's recovered from the floods too.
        But if you're buying a pasty, go to the Bakery - NOT the little supermarket a couple of doors up, next to the car park ... we should have checked more carefully, but hadn't expect to be short changed after such good service in the other places. What a shame after such superb treatment everywhere else. I'd rather have given the £5 to the town funds.
        We shan't visit that one again, but as for the rest, yes - we'll definitely be back!

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        02.05.2009 16:06

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        Watch your change in the little supermarket!

        Among the many lovely shops,we thoroughly recommend the Art shop/Rocky Road Gallery - excellent service and a large range of novelty and art & craft items, difficult to know which to choose!
        And well done to the friendly and efficient Harbour Light Tea Rooms, newly opened in the cottage on the site of the old 13th Century pixie house which was washed away. They deserve every success.
        And the same goes for the thriving Museum of Witchcraft, glad to see it's recovered from the floods too.
        But if you're buying a pasty, go to the Bakery - NOT the stores a couple of doors up next to the car park ... we should have checked more carefully, but hadn't expect to be short changed after such good service in the other places. What a shame after such superb treatment everywhere else. I'd rather have given the £5 to the town funds.
        We shan't visit that one again, but as for the rest, yes - we'll definitely be back!

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        03.04.2007 17:18

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        I first visited Boscastle some 40 years ago and I still get a buzz from visiting this most beautiful place.I have stayed in most of the B&Bs which are all very good but must recomend Lower Meadows for its beautiful clean rooms, fantastic breakfasts and lovely couple who run it. You have to walk up to Willapark to the left of the Harbour as the views are breathtaking.Keith.

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        30.04.2006 10:33
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        All in all - it is a village you Must visit at least once.

        I first went to Boscastle when 9 years old - after my uncle bought a garage in nearby Camelford. As soon as we drove down the winding road, and I saw the 500 year old bridge and buildings; the fast-flowing river and beautiful harbour - I fell in love with it. I have since been back there another 9 times, and am planning to go again in a few months. The Bottreaux house hotel is a favourite to stay in, with clean rooms good food, pleasant owners and also being in a good position for walks: Including the 'churches' walk - being very near the Minster church in particular - a spooky little church in a small valley -with a witches grave just outside the graveyard. (The woman buried in the witches grave was originally a skeleton on display in the Witch's museum - but they felt it was disrespectful).
        The cliff walks near Boscastle are spectacular - and I have walked from Boscastle to Tintagel Castle and Back again before - but it was a tiring day!
        within Boscaslte there is a pottery shop - apparently this particular workshop uses a method knwn only to them - that has been passed down for hundreds of years - I have many of their ornaments and mugs and pencil holders in my home!
        The witch museum in particular is also worth a visit - I was very young when I first went, but some children may get a bit scared when they see pickled animal lungs and genuine voodoo dolls etc.
        I went back for the first time after the flood damage last year - and to be honest I cried a little - two of the oldest structures, a little shop with a collapsing slate roof, and the medieval bridge - were gone. However they have bounced back from the damage wonerfully, and I still got the feeling of being somewhere a little bit magic.
        The ONLY downfall to this wonderful 500 year old fishing village, is how busy it gets in the height of summer. I personally think the best time to go is in May - when all the flowers are out in the Rocky Valley (another must see - with the old Mill and ancient Carvings) and the wind wont blow you off the top of Tintagel Castle!
        The witchcraft museum entry fee was £3 when I last went here is the website: www.museumofwitchcraft.com
        The Riverside Hotel is £30 a night B and B for 2 sharing
        www.hotelriverside.co.uk
        The Cobweb Inn offers excellent prices and an extensive menu
        www.cobwebinn.co.uk
        Everything really is reasonably priced and is open throughout the year.
        Boscastle is in North Cornwall not too far from Bodmin - if you are on this site I asume you hve the internet - so do a little bit of searching on google and you'll find plenty of info! Hope I've convinced a few of you to visit!

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          13.11.2002 17:33
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          I stayed in Boscastle for a couple of days with my boyfriend. Neither of us had been to Cornwall before. As a result of this visit we are coming back for another holiday this year. We stayed on a farm called Trerosewill which was excellent (perhaps I?ll write about that another time). Boscastle is a small fishing village. Its harbour is surrounded by cliffs and is very picturesque. It has a river running through it to the sea. It also has a blow hole that shoots water across the entrance of the harbour in rough weather. We never saw it, we were told about it by a local. Definitely worth taking a look at if the weather is not at its best! Another great thing about Boscastle is The Museum of Witchcraft. It is opposite the river which leads to the harbour. Although it is only small it has all you could imagine related to witchcraft. It is not tacky but very informative and full of interesting facts. We wish we spent longer looking around as we went as we were leaving to go home. A must see!! There is also a shop called The Otherworld which sells witchcraft and magical artifacts and paraphernalia. Things like tarot cards, and crystal balls. There are plenty of other shops selling gifts and souvenirs. There is also a pottery shop which is good if you like pottery! We spent a night in The Cobweb, a very popular pub. The people were very friendly and the atmosphere was great. Apparently it got its name because when it was converted from a warehouse it had thousands of cobwebs in it! The menu looked very nice although we never ate as we were too busy sampling the Scrumpy! The surrounding area is also worth a look at. Tintagel is only 3 miles away (ruins of Tintagel Castle) and Padstow is about 12 miles away.

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            20.08.2002 15:09
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            Boscastle is a beautiful village lying on the North Cornish coast in the Valency Valley. The village plays host to one of the most attractive harbours I have ever seen and it is the only natural harbour on the coast for 20 miles. The village can easily be missed by tourists swooping through on their way to visit the nearby more widely renowned Tintagel but is well worth a visit. The village itself used to be a thriving port but looking around the harbour today this is hard to imagine. The harbour can be reached via a path that winds its way from the High Street down to the sea, following the river. The river is surprisingly calm and sedately flowing for one so close to the sea and puts you in the mood for the sight which is about to hit you. As you reach the harbour you can see the river widening out and forming a bay beneath the rocky overhangs on either side. A rocky peninsula juts out from one side, forming a sort of harbour wall and by this bob up and down the small fishing vessels and yachts that are moored there. Little paths continue past the harbour and there are several available routes: a lower route for those with no head for heights and a higher rockier route for the more adventurous. The rocky outcroppings forming the harbour?s protective walls are tall and sweep round the bay. At the harbour's entrance lies the Boscastle Blowhole. This produces a strange eerie noise under certain weather conditions just after low tide as the water rushes through. The last rocky promontory can easily be climbed on foot. Grassy outcroppings are scattered over the rocks and there are numerous spots to be found, which are perfect for a contemplative rest or a picnic. From these resting points views can be had either back down the river, towards the village or out to sea. On a hot summer's day the setting is idyllic and it would be easy to spend hours there entranced by the natural beauty of the surroundings. I
            had visited Boscastle several times as a child but the village found an even more special place in my heart when I visited with a friend of mine, who was eventually to become Mr Ophelia. We had been on holiday in the depths of Cornwall for a week and stopped in the village on our return journey. The weather was fantastic and we bought chips and sat on the rock promontory watching the sea and enjoying the sun. We then strolled back down the river towards the village and paused for an ice cream cone. I chose a cone with two cups to it, so that I could have two flavours of ice cream and also clotted cream on top! I got admiring glances from passers-by (or were they just astonished at my greed?). However, it was the perfect end to a perfect holiday. The village itself is packed with interesting shops. There are craft shops, gift shops, a rock shop where they will inscribe your rock with any message (I can't remember the name but it is located to the right of the car park!), a disused water mill, pasty shops and shops where you can pop in and arrange for a pot of clotted cream to be sent home to a friend or relation (or, why not have one sent to yourself?). The most interesting attraction that Boscastle houses would have to be the Witches' Museum, which lies on the right at the village end of the harbour. The last time I entered the museum an old crone was taking the money and handing out the tickets. She was a toothless old hag (well, she was a lovely old lady but that wouldn't be so appropriate) and surely must have been a witch herself! Inside you can read about the history of magic, witches, voodoo, black magic etc. Although the subject of witchcraft might be expected to attract the interest of either the young, the strange or the downright deranged (and me, of course) the tone of the museum is not aimed at them. The information is set out clearly and in detail without being polished and hyped for the appetites of lovers o
            f the macabre. It is a serious exhibit and makes for a very interesting few hours. The information is illustrated with a huge number of photographs and artefacts collected by the owner over the years, including a photo once used by a voodoo practiser of a rival in love impaled with pins, a two-headed dog in a jar and various talismans and curses. Boscastle also makes an ideal base from which to explore the surrounding area. There are numerous walks taking you to other nearby beauty spots such as Crackington Haven, High Cliff (the highest point on the Cornish coast), Stangles Beach and Willapark (Iron Age defensive works). Boat trips are available to Long Island, which houses a nature reserve where many wild birds can be seen, especially during the breeding season, including guillemots, puffins and razorbills. Or you can take a ride on the Peginina, which will take you on an all day fishing trip around nearby shipwrecks! Boscastle is a lovely village and, although it might appeal as a destination for its shops, location or museum, it is so utterly beautiful and awe inspiring that it is worth visiting just for the sheer beauty of its harbour alone.

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              28.07.2002 17:41
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              As a child, my parents owned a holiday cottage near Bude in North Cornwall and, for them, no holiday was complete without a trip to Boscastle. Oh, how I hated the place! Two or three times a year, we would follow exactly the same routine. Park in the car park, a leisurely stroll down the riverside to the harbour, not forgetting the obligatory visit to the dank and extremely smelly public toilets half way there. If I had been especially well behaved that day, I might get a knickerbocker glory at the café before we crossed the little bridge and walked up the other side of the river back to the car. Times change. People change. Boscastle, it seems, hasn't really changed significantly since I was a child but my perception of it obviously has, since it is now one of my favourite places. It's so much more than a boring walk, enlivened only by the prospect of a "Knickerblocker Gory". Much of Boscatle and the surrounding area has been designated an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Once a working harbour, built by Sir Richard Grenville in 1584, the coming of the railways to Cornwall made it almost redundant. The National Trust stepped in to preserve it and now owns and maintains the harbour and most of the surrounding coastline. A pay and display car park - with new (and much more fragrant) public toilets - has been built at one end of the village. Located in the car park is a bright, modern visitors centre, featuring displays of local wildlife and selling small gifts, maps and books about the area, many printed by the local Bossiney Press. The staff there can offer advice on anything and everything from accommodation to attractions, including recent sightings of various species of birds and sea life. Here you can also find details of guided walks in the area, including evening 'bat walks' and early morning walks to listen to the dawn chorus. You can still walk down the side of the river as I used to do as a ch
              ild, admire the harbour, cross the little bridge and return to the car park along the other side. But, as I have discovered over the years, there is more to Boscastle than meets the eye. The casual visitor may well drive straight past the village without stopping. From the road, there is little to see except for a quick flash of the harbour, a horrendous hairpin bend and a stretch of road that might look vaguely familiar due to a car commercial having been filmed there last year. Yet anyone choosing to stop for a while has a wide choice of interesting things to see and do. Leaving the car park and walking towards the harbour there is a cluster of small shops. Here you will find a gallery of holograms, a teddy bear shop, a shop specialising in leather goods including handbags, handmade shoes and belts and a couple of shops selling items for alternative lifestyles such as crystals, tarot cards, books and essential oils. Many of these shops have been built in a now disused water mill and the mill wheel is still located outside. Continuing on, you'll see Clovelly Clothing, one of a small local chain of shops that sell outdoor clothes, hiking boots, shoes, fleeces etc at bargain prices. There are a couple of antique shops, potteries where you can actually watch the potters at work, a gallery of local artists, a tiny clothes shop, a greengrocers and The Rock Shop which, in addition to selling Cornish sweets, fudge and biscuits also has a range of locally made ice cream to die for. (I defy anyone to sample the 'White Chocolate and Raspberry' without wanting a second helping on their way back to the car.) 'Pretty Things', a little further along the river, sells just what you would expect from it's name - jewellery, ornaments, glassware and knick-knacks galore, including some made from locally mined tin. Before we get to the harbour, there is The Museum of Witchcraft to visit. Opened in the 1960's, this is a som
              ewhat spooky collection of artefacts connected with witchcraft, beautifully displayed and indexed and is an absolute must for anyone with even a passing interest in Wicca, witchcraft or folklore. Allow at least a couple of hours to see everything and bear in mind that, as a child, some of the exhibits I saw there prompted a desire to sleep with the lights on for several weeks after each visit. Small children may find it boring, even frightening - older children should find it intriguing. So, we've ignored the numerous café's and pubs for the time being and strolled on, past the National Trust shop, Youth Hostel and a couple more gift shops, right down to the harbour where we can see - and hear when the tide is right - a natural blowhole. We could turn either left or right along the cliffs on the Cornish Coast Path to see the whitewashed lookout tower and the remains of medieval strip farming. We could take a boat trip from the harbour to do some mackerel fishing or just watch the native bird life. We'd probably see razorbills and guillemots and even puffins with their brightly coloured beaks. Chances are we'd also see seals, basking sharks or even dolphins. Yet, so far, we've only explored the tourist's idea of Boscatle. Suppose we'd followed the river through the car park in the opposite direction, away from the harbour and the promise of a "Knickerblocker"? Well, we'd have walked along the picturesque Valency Valley, following the river through woodland and meadows rich with wildflowers, butterflies and birds. We could have sat for a while, watching the trout darting in and out of the shallower waters and perhaps caught a glimpse of deer in the woods on our way. Had we been feeling particularly adventurous, we could have crossed the river on the ancient stepping stones and walked across farmland to Minster Church, the remains of an ancient monastery. The Valency valley was a favoured haunt of wr
              iter Thomas Hardy and his wife Emma and much of his novel "A Pair of Blue Eyes" was based here. Or perhaps we could have ignored the road down to the harbour and walked up through the back streets of the village towards Bottreaux, passing dozens of quaint, traditional cottages on our way. Alternatively, if our ultimate goal was the harbour, we could have taken the footpath that runs high above Boscastle, affording a bird's eye view of the cottages and gardens. If we are in need of refreshment, there are many places to choose from. I've already mentioned the farm made ice cream, but perhaps you would prefer a traditional pasty or a Cornish cream tea? You can still buy a knickerbocker glory, but over the years I've come to prefer the fresh crab sandwiches and salads. And there are pubs, restaurants and café's galore, with menus to suit every taste. The Wellington, affectionately known as "The Welly", serves a range of delicious food, including the 'surfers special' - chips with cheese. (Don't knock it until you've tried it!). Like many buildings in Boscastle, "The Welly" is reputed to be haunted, having at least three ghosts, including an elderly woman who allegedly occupies room 10. Until fairly recently, "The Cobweb" sported original cobwebs dating back many hundred years, although sadly these have now disappeared, probably due to some EEC hygiene regulations. "The Napoleon" serves excellent bar food and also has "Boney's Bistro" (booking advised) where you can enjoy a proper sit down meal. All three pubs serve a range of traditional beers and frequently offer live music and all are traditional authentic olde-worlde pubs with slate floors and exposed beams. Boscastle is located on the B3263, signposted off the main A39 Atlantic Highway which runs through North Cornwall. Nearby are Tintagel with its historic connections to King Arthur
              and a myriad of picturesque coves including Bossiney. Also well worth visiting while in the area are the Rocky Valley, a steep walk down a river valley to the sea, featuring Bronze Age rock carvings and, directly opposite Rocky Valley, St. Nectan's Glen, a privately owned attraction described as one of the ten most important spiritual sites of the country. The walk down to the 60 ft. waterfall is arduous at times, but well worth it, particularly as the owners offer light refreshments at the end in St Nectans Keeve or Kieve. Information about opening times can be found at www.currantbun.stnectan. It is fair to say that Boscastle does get extremely busy during the main tourist season, particularly in the school holidays. I'm lucky enough to live a mere ten miles away and can visit at any time - might I suggest that those of you who are less fortunate plan your visit as early as possible in the morning before the crowds build up. Let me know when you're coming - I do an excellent guided tour for the modest fee of one white chocolate and raspberry ice-cream cone. (You should see what I do for a double cone!) [Jill Murphy asked me to write about one of my favourite things to help her celebrate her fourth anniversary of cancer-free living and to remind ourselves of all the nice things in the world. It takes more muscles to make a frown than a smile you know. If you'd like to join in, whether you've only just joined dooyoo, or you've been here ages, you're more than welcome. Just write about one of YOUR favourite things, make your title "A Favourite Thing: [your choice]" and include this paragraph at the foot of your opinion. And post before Friday, 9th August.] Here's to a cancer free life!

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                04.08.2001 05:35
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                I stayed in Boscastle for a couple of days with my boyfriend. Neither of us had been to Cornwall before. As a result of this visit we are coming back for another holiday this year. We stayed on a farm called Trerosewill which was excellent (perhaps I’ll write about that another time). Boscastle is a small fishing village. Its harbour is surrounded by cliffs and is very picturesque. It has a river running through it to the sea. It also has a blow hole that shoots water across the entrance of the harbour in rough weather. We never saw it, we were told about it by a local. Definitely worth taking a look at if the weather is not at its best! Another great thing about Boscastle is The Museum of Witchcraft. It is opposite the river which leads to the harbour. Although it is only small it has all you could imagine related to witchcraft. It is not tacky but very informative and full of interesting facts. We wish we spent longer looking around as we went as we were leaving to go home. A must see!! There is also a shop called The Otherworld which sells witchcraft and magical artifacts and paraphernalia. Things like tarot cards, and crystal balls. There are plenty of other shops selling gifts and souvenirs. There is also a pottery shop which is good if you like pottery! We spent a night in The Cobweb, a very popular pub. The people were very friendly and the atmosphere was great. Apparently it got its name because when it was converted from a warehouse it had thousands of cobwebs in it! The menu looked very nice although we never ate as we were too busy sampling the Scrumpy! The surrounding area is also worth a look at. Tintagel is only 3 miles away (ruins of Tintagel Castle) and Padstow is about 12 miles away.

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