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      17.07.2010 18:02
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      A Nice Town

      Clitheroe is a small market town located in Lancashire. This is a very quaint little town that sits in a lovely spot at the head of the Ribble Valley. With a population of just over twenty thousand Clitheroe is a bustling little community with a warm and friendly atmosphere. Clitheroe is a popular spot for tourists and a lovely place to stay for a while.

      If you are looking for accommodation in the town there are a few nice little guest houses as well as some larger hotels. There are also a few nice campsites in the area which offer some really nice views of the valley. There are also some privately owned holiday homes in the area which are available for rent.

      Clitheroe's biggest attraction is without a doubt the castle. You do have to pay to get in but it's well worth it especially if you enjoy finding out about history. The castle sits on the small hill in the town and there are some great views out over the town and then out over the surrounding valley from atop the castle walls. This is well worth a visit and something that everyone who visits Clitheroe should go and have a look at.

      There is a nice little shopping area in the centre of Clitheroe. Some great shops for browsing round offering all kinds of things. Clitheroe is well known for it's antique shops and there are also a few nice galleries and craft shops. Another thing the town is well known for it's charity shops, there are many in the town and they are of a very high standard. The town also has a few really good book shops that are excellent to spend a while looking in. A market runs for a few days during the week and this is a great place to pick up a few bargains.

      Clitheroe is well known for it's eating establishments. There are some great bars and bistros that are of an exceptional standard. Probably the most well known is the Emporium which is just down off the main street. There are also some lovely restaurants just out of the town in some of the little villages in the area.

      The town also has an excellent golf course that is thought to be one of the best in the area. There is a nice swimming pool and leisure centre that can also be really good fun. The town also has a very nice park on the north of the town which has some great views of the surrounding hills.

      Overall Clitheroe really is a great little place to visit. This is a very historical town and one of the most beautiful towns in Lancashire. If you are planning staying in the area then Clitheroe really is a great place to visit. It's also a good place to stay as there are many great places to visit in the area so this can be a good place to use as a base. If you have never visited Clitheroe you simply must go and have a look.

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        28.04.2002 22:29
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        Come and visit the location for the new BBC series Born and Bred, which is set in Downham, which is a sleep hamlet set in a valley just below Pendle Hill. The Ribble valley is well worth a visit, wheather for a day trip or weekend break or a holiday. It is a perfect holiday destination, it is also the place were with hundreds of square miles of peaceful countryside. It is also the place where I am luck enough to live and work. Here you can relax in the fresh air, walk the hills, Pendle Hill or Longridge Fell or stroll along riverside paths of the Ribble, Hodder and Calder or explore a number of ancient villages, such as Downham, Grindleton, Waddington, Slaidburn or Hurst Green to name but a few. This is Lancashire Witch country and Pendle Hill looms large over many sleepy hamlets, which today are the haunts of hikers and home to me. History can be seen in Clitheroe with its Norman keep that dominates the limestone rock high above the town and can be seen from the back of my house. You can also visit the local Clitheroe Castle Museum which is open from 11am ? 4.30pm. In Ribchester you can tread in the footsteps of Roman centurions who were stationed at a garrison here. You could also stop a while in Whalley and Sawley and walk amidst the ruins of their Cistercian Abbeys. The Ribble Valley has a wide selection of first class accommodation, restaurants and shops, with a reputation for high quality service, good value for money and a very friendly welcome. I would recommend that you visit Cowman's Sausage Shop in the main street of Clitheroe or visit our famous local vine merchant Byrne. The Ribble Valley is ideal for walking the 'Ribble Way' (waymarked) 70 miles (113km) long follows the course of the River Ribble from its source at Ribblehead to the estuary at Preston; passing through a variety of landscapes including limestone gorge, open moorland and tidal marsh. I personally enjoy walking on both Pendle Hill and Longridge Fell
        . Both are easily accessible by car and provide wonderful views of the surrounding area and the Ribble Valley in particular. On a good day you can easily see the three peaks in Yorkshire. The Forest of Bowland was selected as an ?Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty?. It covers 312 square miles of moorland, fringe farmland, woodland and open river and reservoir landscapes. It is the eleventh largest of the forty-one designated 'AONB' in England and Wales, making it a spectacular area for outdoor activities. Ordnance Survey has declared the village of Dunsop Bridge to be the official 'Centre of the Kingdom'. The payphone's plaque actually confirms its national grid reference as S.D. 6377 5655 the United Kingdom Centre. It is fortunate that Dunsop Bridge is one of the most attractive parts of the kingdom, a fitting setting for such an important location. It is a place often visited by Royalty. For further information visit www.ribblevalley.gov.uk

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          04.04.2001 01:55
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          If you draw a vertical line, on a map of the British isles from the east coast of John’O’Groats in Scotland, to the south coast of Weymouth, a horizontal line from Cleveleys on the Fylde coast, to Beverley in Yorkshire, the chances are that the point at which these lines cross is in the heart of an area known as the Ribble Valley. Clitheroe, a small ancient market town between the cliff top ruins of a Norman Castle and the hillside St Mary Magdalene’s Church is located within this valley. It is nestled in the shadow of the bulk of ‘Pendle Hill,’ famously known through it’s association with Lancashire witchcraft, but is the largest town in this popular area. It is a close knit community, where if you kick someone on the ankles then everybody in town limps. The same families have run many of the shops for years. Moor Lane towards the town centre, is similar to others, with various shops and cafes lining the street on both sides and leads directly to the 12th century castle ruins. However, I did see a shop of some significance, which was down an alley to the right leading to ‘Roundstone Books,’ a haven of tranquillity for browsers and book lovers. There are hundreds of second hand books for sale with all major credit cards accepted. Opposite the shop was ‘The Grapevine Café Bar’ where you could relax and examine your recent acquisition. ‘Bowden Books’ are another second hand and antiquarian bookseller within the town. A massive limestone rock on which the castle keep is built and the nearby museum dominate the skyline. The entrance to the grounds is located on Castle Gate. The long winding steps to the castle keep have eroded with the constant passage of tourists over the years. Trees are not yet in full bloom, but clumps of daffodils around them add to the grandeur of the scene. There are spectacular views of the town, and
          beyond, and you can walk inside the remains of this ancient structure. You cannot help but wonder, what took place within, all those years ago. An original turret from the parapet of the houses of parliament, erected between 1840 and 1854, stands in solitude within the grounds. It was presented to the Borough of Clitheroe to commemorate the coronation of King George VI on the 12th May 1937. Inside the grounds are formal gardens, tennis courts, bowling green/café and an open-air auditorium and bandstand, where rock music and brass band concerts are held during the summer months. There is small admission fee into the museum, where you can sample geology and local life, and there is a re-creation of a clogger’s workshop, printers shop and lead mine. Castle Street is one way to traffic passing through the town, and is similar to other main thoroughfares. However, ‘McKays dresses,’ ‘Nettleton’s jewellers’ and ‘Kaleidoscope fashions’ provide a local flavour for shoppers. The interior of ‘Hampsons’ confectionery was immaculate and if ever a gentleman was perfectly cast for the role, then it was he behind the counter. Now forgive me if I sound rude or impolite, but this large rotund shop assistant, dressed in bleached white clothing and pork pie hat, appeared as though he had eaten them all! He had the largest ‘jowls’ I have seen for some time. A jolly chap he was, but those facial cheeks were like saddlebags. Opposite the ‘Starkie Arms,’ and adjacent to ‘The Swan and Royal,’ is a narrow alley leading into ‘Swan Courtyard’ a maize of smaller shops containing, clothing, craft and musical instruments. D.Byrne & Co wine merchants on King Street have been awarded the Independent Wine and Merchant of the Year award on two occasions, and have featured on BB2’s ‘Vintners Tales’. They also s
          pecialise in tea and coffee. Also featured on television was Cowman’s Famous Sausage Shop, renowned for over 60 different varieties of British sausage available fresh everyday. Clitheroe has an attractive open-air market held every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday selling locally produced fruit and vegetables, clothing and crafts. There are over 80 stalls and stone built cabins. Early closing day is Wednesday and a flea market is held every Friday. Black puddings and tripe can be purchased from the stall ‘Ecky Thump,’ which is located at the rear of ‘Jimmy Clitheroes’ fish and chip shop at the end of New Market Street. The old railway station as been converted into ‘The Platform Gallery’ exhibiting arts and crafts. However, funds have been allocated by the Arts Lottery to upgrade facilities and the gallery is closed until July 2001. Why not board a train at Clitheroe interchange and obtain a day return pass to Preston, or even a Ribble Valley day ranger pass. Both will cost adults £3.00 and children and senior citizen’s £1.50. DalesRail is Clitheroe’s special rail link to Blackpool and Carlisle via the scenic Settle route. Only a short distance away on the road to Longridge is Edisford Bridge, providing picnic areas, a miniature railway, children’s play areas, cafés, pitch and put and a swimming pool. There are many other towns and villages in the Ribble Valley including, Bashall Eaves, Bolton By Bowland, Chatburn, Chipping, Dunsop Bridge and Gisburn. The small village of Hurst Green houses the world famous ‘Stonyhurst College’ a roman catholic boarding school and museum. Oliver Cromwell stayed here in 1648 and the creator of Sherlock Holmes – Arthur Conan Doyle was a former pupil. The college was the setting for the famous novel ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles,’and the museum contains a 7th century gospel of St J
          ohn. Other towns and villages include, Longridge, Newton in Bowland, Ribchester, Sabden, Slaidburn, Waddington, Whalley and Whitewell. The tiny village of Downham, which stands beneath the massive Pendle Hill, is another favourite, and probably one of the loveliest villages in Lancashire. It is only a few miles down the A.59 towards Skipton – the gateway to the Yorkshire Dales. I have spent many happy hours in this peaceful location. It was used as the location for the film, ‘Whistle Down The Wind’ A tiny stream runs through the village and scores of ducks have made it their home over the years. Tourists park their cars at the edge of the stream and feed them with bread from their picnic baskets. There are small terraced cottages, a small shop and post office and The ‘Assheton Arms’ provide a wide range of beverages, traditional and continental quisine in convivial surroundings. Pendle Hill is one of the areas best known landmarks rising above the villages and towns. Motorists and hill walkers can enjoy superb views, and skiers can practice their skills on a dry ski slope, whilst hang gliders launch themselves into the air to soar above the countryside. Perhaps it is more famous because of the legend of Lancashire Witches. It was during the reign of King James I that events took place. Mother Demdike and Mother Chattox, two old women living beneath Pendle Hill were accused of witchcraft and sent to Lancaster Castle for trail. On Good Friday, 1612, twenty local people plotted to raid the castle, kill the keeper and free the two woman. The plot failed and on August 20th 1612 they were hanged in front of large crowds. Many other arrests and executions followed. The novelist William Harrison Ainsworth produced ‘The Lancashire Witches’ in 1848. Every Halloween the local police have to set up a one way system of traffic over Pendle Hill, as hundreds of tou
          rists are drawn to this mysterious place. Clitheroe is less than an hour away from the seaside resort of Blackpool and an hour and half from the Lake District and is easily accessible through the motorway networks. Exit J.31 on the M6 motorway and follow the A.59 to Skipton Clitheroe Castle Museum: Admission: £1.50p – Adults. £0.25p – Children under 14years. £0.65p – Senior Citizens Clitheroe Tourist information: 01200.425566. Clitheroe Interchange Control Centre: 01200.429832. NorthWestern trains: 0345.484950. National rail information: 08457.484950 Roundstone Books: e-mail.joharbooks@aol.com Bowden Books: email.bowdenbookshill.dabsae.co.uk www.ribblevalley.gov.uk Hotel, bed and breakfast accommodation are available throughout the Ribble valley and further information can be obtained on any of the above telephone numbers or by visiting the web site. Despite rumours to the contrary, our reigning monarch is very much amused because in the queens biography ‘Elizabeth’ written by Sarah Bradford, she made it known that she would not mind retiring to ‘The Ribble Valley.’ Testament indeed, from someone who has probably visited all the countries in the world. I wonder if her predecessor, Elizabeth I, the daughter of King Henry V111 and Anne Boleyn, born 468 years ago on the 4th April 1533 would have thought the same. Many thanks, Peter2670

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