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    6 Reviews
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      03.09.2011 21:39
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      Being developed all the time

      Bottle neck of the way out of London. Has a market with few interesting shops in it or entertainment unlike Convent Garden which is in the same style. Cutty Sark is there as the main attraction all refurbished after recent fire. There is a museum and park as well as other tourist sites all in a small walkable area. A small cinema and wide variety of restaurants and bars are available also. Docklands Light Railway runs through to Isle of Dogs and Lewisham and a few bus routes are also available. Has a market with few interesting shops in it or entertainment unlike Convent Garden which is in the same style. Cutty Sark is there as the main attraction all refurbished after recent fire. There is a museum and park as well as other tourist sites all in a small walkable area. A small cinema and wide variety of restaurants and bars are available also. Docklands Light Railway runs through to Isle of Dogs and Lewisham and a few bus routes are also available.

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        16.09.2009 11:02
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        Highly Recommend a visit

        Greenwich is my home borough and the town of Greenwich is somewhere that I love to visit on a regular basis. Having grown up in the area I can honestly say that some of my best memories are held in Greenwich from being a little girl, teenager and now adult (ha ha sort of) So I thought it was only right that I write a review on Greenwich because I love it so much. So to start with some Greenwich facts, Greenwich is in South East London and is home to the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich Mean Time & the meridian line and the Royal Observatory. It is also home to the O2 formally the Millennium Dome (but we will keep that quiet), a royal Park and the Cutty Sark (which is currently closed for renovation due to reopen in 2010). Greenwich is a historic town and is famous for its architecture. The museums in Greenwich as with most of the Museums in London are free entry apart from the Cutty Sark. Greenwich has good transport links with the DLR, river boat service and North Greenwich tube station and lots of bus routes so is easy to get to and is around a 20 minute journey from Central London. One of my favourite days out is to go to Greenwich park be it in the Summer or Winter. Greenwich Park is very special to me as it's the place I used to spend most of my time as a young girl. When you enter Greenwich Park from the entrance on Blackheath the first part of the park you will come to is the flower garden the gate to the garden is on the right just as you walk in the main gate. The flower Garden is fragrant and full of lovely flower beds as the name would suggest. It is also home to the lake which always has hungry ducks and geese waiting for children to come and feed them their endless supply of stale bread. Just a bit further into the garden is the entrance to the Deer enclosure this is a popular part of the park with my daughter and we spend quite some time trying to spot the deer. The Squirrels in Greenwich Park have to be without a doubt the friendliest in London, they will quite happily come up to you while you eat your sandwiches and sit and wait for a while you reward them with a nut then run off only to come back for more even my slightly over excitable 3 year old shouting and squealing they are still happy to approach! Greenwich Park also has one of the best views in London. From the top of the hill, under the Wolfe statue, you get a fantastic view of the river and docklands and North London. The hills in the park are great for sleighing down on snowy days or rolling down on sunny days. The other part of the park we spend a lot of time in is the kids play park just outside of the play park is a boating lake where you can paddle around in your very own boat not sure how much this cost but you can hire a boat for an hour or half an hour in the summer months. The play park has a big sand pit and lots of play equipment you can also get refreshments from the little hut situated in the middle of the play park. Just across the road from the park is Greenwich Market, Greenwich Market is a quirky under cover market selling all sorts of bits and bobs mainly arts and crafts and antiques and my favourite thing of all the food! All types of food are available at the market from all different cultures and I can spend most of the time I am there eating my favourite is the Jerk Chicken stall and the Crepe stall but all of the stalls have yummy goods for you to buy and eat! When I fancy a drink after all that food my favourite place has to be the Trafalgar Tavern which is situated on the river. It's a lovely cosy Pub with a lovely view out onto the river and on a hot day you can sit outside and watch the boats go by. They have a barbeque in the summer and also serve food inside but it's a bit on the pricey side. Greenwich has lots of independent shops selling everything from clothes to books and also some of the recognised high street chains like Waterstones and Marks and Spencers food to go. I really cannot recommend Greenwich enough, Maybe I am a bit biased but I am sure that anyone who goes to Greenwich for a day out will not be let down and have a great time. If you do go I will be the one rolling down the hills in the park or stuffing my face in the Market. Thanks for reading!

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          13.07.2009 12:43
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          beautiful historic area with amazing village feel

          Greenwich is a beautiful area of London that is often over looked by tourists and Londoners. The area of Greenwich is steeped in history but it is also beautiful 'village' that feels like your out of London and in the country somewhere. Some of the interesting attractions include the Royal Observatory, with a new Planetarium that is now regularly full of school trips but is definitely worth a visit. There is also the Greenwich Meantime where clocks are set from with a red ball of a spire that moves at exactly 1pm, it is not the most dramatic sight so don't worry if you miss it. You shouldn't, however, miss the beautiful view from the top of Greenwich park of Canary Wharf and East London. Greenwich park is a hive of activity all year round, when its sunny it is pack full of families, dog walkers and students, with impromptu football and touch rugby games. The park is also the start of the famous London Marathon. Greenwich University is spread over a number of sites but the main campus is right in the middle of Greenwich in the historic former Naval College, which is also makes up part of the National Maritime Museum. The majority of Greenwich's history is based around sailing and maritime activities, even if you are not an avid sailor there are lots of interesting places to visit. I would have recommended visiting the Cutty Sark, a tea cutter ship that is on display right on the river front. This is an icon of Greenwich and it was sadly removed for essential repairs and maintenance, during this process there was a huge fire that caused serious damage but the restorers have vowed to bring the ship back to its former glory along with a new viewing platform that allows you to see under the ship. Greenwich has lots of tight alleys and markets with lots of independent companies selling all types of arts, craft and food. You can easily spend hours exploring all these shops and find some great gifts. Greenwich isn't terribly hard to get to but it would benefit from a more direct transport link. You can get the DLR from Bank and that takes you right in to the centre of Greenwich. There is an overland train station which is about 10min walk from the shops/attractions. The best way to get to Greenwich is by boat, there are regular services between Greenwich and central london like Embankment and the South Bank. It is a very relaxing and beautiful journey that shows you some of the best sights in London.

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            16.09.2006 15:34
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            A great day in Greenwich...

            London, England. The capital city, and one of the most culturally rich, diverse, hot-spots in Europe. Laden with history, London boasts one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world - hardly surprising when one considers all it has to offer. Central London has much to offer, and with the improvements in transport and infrastructure that have been made in the lat 10 years or so, London is well catered to tourists, seeking British culture in such a highly concentrated quantity. On the South of the River Thames lies one of London's most historic towns: Greenwich. Easily accessible via bus or National Rail from Central London; however, I chose to take the DLR (Docklands Light Railway), which costs the same as a tube journey. It took me an hour to get from Holland Park tube station to Greenwich, including the change at Bank Station, on the central line. (For more in-depth transport info, visit the Transport for London website: www.tfl.gov.uk). I alighted at "Cutty Sark", which is a short stop from Greenwich station, and is more conveniently located for the historical and maritime areas that Greenwich has to offer. Greenwich itself is bursting with areas to explore. Firstly, the town, which has an array of small, local shops, as well as chains. I didn't spend a great deal of time in the town centre, but noticed a Church and Market that looked worth visiting; but it was all very clean and well maintained, and I was impressed with the aesthetic feel to the place. Greenwich is home to the University of Greenwich, offering a diverse selection of courses (www.gre.ac.uk), located in some of the finest buildings in London, with impressive architecture. It's well worth walking through the main campus, which is situated right on the Thames. The famous Cutty Sark lies at Greenwich (http://www.cuttysark.org.uk), the world's last Tea Clipper. Aldult admission is £5, which includes literature to help you make the most of your visit and understand why the ship is so famous. There are also guides available who will accompany you on your visit to help you maximise your experience. The National Maritime Museum is in Greenwich and is the largest Maritime Museum in the world, housing impressive Maritime collections, with everything relating to the history of the sea, both Nationally, and Internationally. The museum itself takes a good 2-3 hours to explore - longer if you want to read everything. There are convenient areas to eat and I ate my own lunch in the cafe area without any problem. There was a large variety of exhibitions, ranging from Nautical History, Maritime Science, as well as impressive collections of Models and Paintings. Directly next to the Museum is Queen's House, housing the finest paintings in the Maritime collection. Unfortunately, the upper floors were closed for refurbishment when I visited, but the ground floor collections were very impressive. The staff were a little snooty with me, but other than that, I had a pleasant visit. The most famous and impressive feature of Greenwich is the Royal Observatory (http://www.rog.nmm.ac.uk). Unfortunately for me, I clearly chose the busiest Saturday to visit, as it was heavily populated with tourists from every country on the planet, all having their photographs taken in front of the Greenwich Mean Time line. The exhibitions are very impressive, showing the history of Time and Space, and how the Royal Observatory played a part in establishing the conventions of time that we all follow. The exhibitions are not very big in terms of people-space, and I felt quite claustrophobic. I ended up flying through quite quickly to avoid the crowds, and certainly wouldn't go again during peak season, if I could afford not to. Also, the Observatory is a good 20 minute walk from the Museum, and up quite a steep hill - which might not be suitable for the elderly or disabled. The website provides more information on this. Overall, I had a great time in Greenwich. The Pier at Greenwich provides access for boat trips that leave from Embankement Pier - a great way to get there from Central London if the weather is pleasant, particularly if taking a partner or young children.

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              16.04.2001 00:53
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              This is probably not the right place to put this op. but I've asked for a place to put it and received no answer, so I thought London to be the place for it to go for now. As this is where Greenwich is, even though this op is not about Greenwich itself. Can anyone see the point of British Summer Time? Every March we all put our clocks forward by 1 hr, what exactly for? It is called daylight saving! How on earth can you save daylight? If there are 12 hrs of daylight, there are 12 hrs of daylight, irrespective of what time you call it. All we are doing is shifting the daylight along by 1 hr of our time. I know years ago it was meant to have been done for the farmers, as they had to get up early. Don’t many people? I cannot see the relevance in this anymore. I do not think other countries do this, they seem to manage all right. If it gets light at 5am then after the clocks have been altered it will become light at 6am. Where is the benefit in that? I can see the benefit of making it lighter in the evenings but I thought it was originally to benefit the farmers in the mornings! Someone tell me if I’m wrong. Also as the months go on it is going to get lighter in the mornings and evenings anyway, as we get nearer the sun, without altering the clocks. There are also a lot of costs involved. Changing timers in nearly everything today. I used to work for a company and twice a year we had to send out people to change the timers in the car park ticket machines. It used to cost a fortune. There are all sorts of machines today relying on time and they all have to be altered twice a year, for what? It is a waste of time and money. Does 1 hour really make that much difference? (Only when you are made to get up an hour earlier!) Why don’t we just put the clocks back in October and leave them there at the normal Greenwich Mean Time. After a couple of years people will be wondering why we ever bothered. I ’m sure there were a couple of years during the war when it was not done, did it affect anyone? It would be interesting to see how many people see this practise as a waste of time and money and would rather opt to leave the clocks alone.

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                21.02.2001 18:52
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                The Dome. There, I've said it. It's a sad fact that it's impossible to consider Greenwich as a place without first clambering over that mental obstacle, but in its defence the architecture is fab (especially lit up at night), and it provided a proper tube station for the area (North Greenwich), and...well...look, everyone makes mistakes. At least the 'Millennium Experience' part of it has gone now - with any luck, Ministry of Sound will buy it and turn it into one of the capital's biggest and best venues. Though I'm not holding my breath. There's a lot more to Greenwich than the aforementioned white elephant (which we will not speak of again). It's an area with a lot of maritime history, and of course it is the home of 'time' itself (which I can never quite get my head round). It has a very high concentration of tourist attractions for a suburb, and the centre feels more like a seaside village than inner London. It's also a great place to live in the city, because it has good transport links (less than half an hour to central London) and is quite cheap, due to the SE postcode (and, I suspect, the proximity of Deptford, which is kind of stapled to one side of it). Greenwich is probably best known for the Cutty Sark - a huge nineteenth century clipper ship now moored on the dock. I won't relay its history because frankly boats are boring (sorry), but to make amends for my omission I have found the official website for you - http://www.cuttysark.org.uk - and it is a veritable mine of information. If you want to scare yourself, wander around it at night, when it looks like a ghost ship. Whooooo. Another fine way to amuse yourself is walk under the river on the Thames Path. This is free, and brings you out at Island Gardens on the other side. There's not much to do when you get there really, but the view is pretty. The Royal Observatory is Greenwich's other recognised attracti on, and is a lot more exciting. Situated in the lush Greenwich Park, you can get an amazing view of the capital and play on the Meridian Line (where you can stand with one foot in the eastern hemisphere and one in the western). The Maritime Museum is also based in the park but again I have not the patience to talk about sea-faring things. At the weekend, Greenwich has brilliant and varied markets - antiques, crafts, vintage clothes, music, organic foods. The actual shops in the centre are split into two categories - Boaty Souvenirs (yawn) and Old Things. There is a plethera of vintage clothes places (of which The Emporium and Observatory are best), and one of my favourite shops EVER, Flying Duck Enterprises, which sells kitsch (read: 'garish and reasonably hideous') retro homewares, accessories and much more. The premises are quite small but are crammed wall-to-wall with all-singing, all-dancing glittery tack. It's on Creek Road, opposite the Cutty Sark DLR station - go! There is also a regular Saturday CD Sale in the church hall, where you can pick up some genuine bargains. There is also a long parade of shops and cafes that leads to the residential areas. As a place to live, Greenwich is quite middle-of-the-road (in terms of crime problems and so forth), but there are a lot of run-down estates that contrast starkly with the cosmopolitan centre. If you don't know where you're going it's best not to wander round at night (but then the same could be said of all London suburbs). There are several nice bars and eateries - 'Time' gives you the best of both worlds and is highly recommended. 'Noodle Time' is another of my bestest things about Greenwich - effectively a fast-food restaurant (in terms of price at least - don't expect to pay more than around £5 per head), but the meals are huge and absolutely delicious. The Gloucester pub, which is slightly out of the centre, is predominantly gay but great for cheap drinks (lots of £1 offers on weekdays) - parts of the film Beautiful Thing were also filmed there. One part of Greenwich that I have left reasonably untouched is the Peninsula, the area around the Dome (sshh!) that is being regenerated. At present it is a bit of an industrial wasteland, but in a few years' time (apparently) it will be a leisure and retail mecca. Currently it houses the 'millennium' Sainsburys - the most environmentally friendly supermarket in Europe; a landmark school' that looks like a log cabin and has a creche, health centre and 24-7 internet access for students; and the promise of a multiplex cinema any day now (honest). It's still a bit rough round the edges and I wouldn't suggest going out of your way to visit, but I honestly believe in five years it will be a thriving mini-community. Another area that is being developed at present is Deptford Creek, the no-man's-land that connects Greenwich and Deptford. The new houses appearing there are actually really nice - although a complete makeover for Deptford is long overdue (apparently putting the whole of SE9 underground is not feasible - hmph). GREENWICH, LONDON SE10 (ZONE 2) TRANSPORT: Rail: Greenwich, Maze Hill, Westcombe Park Docklands Light Railway: Greenwich, Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich Tube: North Greenwich (Jubilee line)

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