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Isle of Anglesey in general

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      29.07.2010 02:09
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      A guide to Anglesey

      Anglesey or Yns Mon either you love or hate this island. The island nestles off the end of the north wales coast line and is also know for the ferry to Ireland. To get to the island you can either get accross by The Britainnia bridge or the Menai bridge which were built by Brunel. As you cross the Britannia bridge you will see the Anglesey Statue in the distance and close to this is the village with the longest name but shortened to LLanfairpg for obvious reasons. Pringles village is situated here which is anglesey answer to a designer outlet!. The island is very mixed you have beautiful sandy beaches of Red Wharf, Treaduur and Rhosniger etc and then you have the stoney beaches of bull bay and holyhead town beach. Rhosniger is quite famous as it is for the elite windsurfer and many a time the World wind surfing championship has been held on this beech. The RAF feature on Anglesey and it is known as a nato base where it does training for the nato piliots also helicoptor training is carried out here. It is facinating to watch the hawks fly around the island and sometimes you do get to see the red arrows practising now and again. Beaumauris is worth a visit as quite a quaint town with the castle, Holyhead has some history but mainly it is a port. The capitial town is Llangefni again it is mainly a few shops. If you get chance South Stack and the views over the menai straits are worth a look. There are plenty pubs to eat in at however the pancake house is worth a visit at Rhosneigher and there is a wonderful Italian in Bangor close to the pier. I havent found any other good eating places there worth raving about yet. There are plenty of things to do on Anglesey whether you want to spend a day on the beach or visiting many of the tourist attractions. Also it is worth a day trip over to Dublin as it only takes an hour and a half. However it can be very relaxing but it isnt a place if you want bustling nightlife as there nearest you get to is the locals singing tom jones songs at karoake

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      13.06.2010 00:27

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      Anglesey. Lovely place but the noise coming from the Illegal rave at Carrgewlyd Estate, Llanfaethlu drove me insane whilst staying at Church Bay. Worst still the Council knew nothing about it and the Police did nothing about it. Came here to relax but ended up more stressed than when I first came here. Perhaps I'll find somewhere nice and quiet to relax next time but not here

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      29.07.2003 02:03
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      I’ve live on Anglesey all of my life, and I used to think of it as, well, a dump really . nothing much to do for young people, but since I moved away to university my opinion has changed dramatically. In my younger years I used to think Anglesey was a bit of a dump really, nothing to do for miles around. Lately my opinion has changed. When I finished school I was ready to escape to the big city, somewhere with multiplex cinemas and a macdonalds, not beaches and mountains. After a while I reolised I was actually missing the peaceful picturesque isle of Anglesey, and since my return for the summer I have really enjoyed what the quite untouched island has to offer. It is a fabulous place to come on holiday for those who enjoy walking or even fishing as well as anyone who wants a relaxing holiday. Many tourists visit each year and stay in one of the many hotels, B&B’s or cottages across the island. There are many different places to go and see, my favourite place to go must be Llanddwyn Island. It isn’t really an Island as only about twice a year is it cut off from the shore. It is situated in between two gorgeous blue flagged beaches. The views are amazing from there and will truly take anyone’s breath away. The best time to visit must be in the evening though having a picnic whilst watching the sunset. Here is also a perfect spot for fishing as is Alaw lake in Llangefni both very popular with the locals. Birdwatching is also an extremely popular pastime on Anglesey with attractions such as the infamous Puffin Island and Bird World in Brynciencyn. I do realise these aren’t everybodies idea of fun but there is plenty of other things to do in the area shopping beig one. I am a self confessed shopaholic but there isn’t a great deal of shops on Anglesey. Llangefni, Menai Bridge, Holyhead, Beaumaris and Llanfairpwll have some shops and banks but not a vast amount. However many options ar
      e available to anybody who wants a bit of retail therapy. Holyhead is ideal for a crossing to Ireland and with the newly built road straight through Anglesey one side of the Island to Holyhead on the other is around half an hour. I regularly visit Dublin because it is so close and the whole trip there is 2 hours long from anywhere on the Island. I would say a visit is a must as it is so convenient. Another option is the train service that takes you to the various towns on the coast packed with shops such as Llandudno, Rhyl, Bangor or Chester all about an hour or less away. On the Island however I would say a visit to Llanfairpwll is a must it has the second longest name in the world with its full name being, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllsantysilliogogogoch. Here there are many little quaint local shops to visit as well as James Pringle Weavers which is the biggest souviner shop on the Island, selling clothes shoes food household items, and the regular tourist items like postcards and sticks of rock. Also in Llanfairpwll is the best focal point of the whole island, the Marquis’s column. For a small fee you can climb around a hundred steps to a scenic over the Menai Straits encompassing the two bridges which join the island to the mainland. The Island also has plenty of places of historical interest such as Beaumaris castle and Beaumaris Gaol which detail much of the history of the island. Also between Brynciencyn and Llanfairpwll is Plas Newydd. This is a National trust property which is where the Lord and Lady Anglesey. It is a fantastic place to visit with its tremendous buildings and extensive gardens. In the summer Plas Newydd regularly has performances of Shakespeare plays in the gardens where you sit outside with a picnic and enjoy the show followed by fireworks. As well as this in the summer (middle of August) there is the Anglesey show on the island. This is a field full of stal
      ls from local companies and craftsmen, as well as competitions for local farmers, horse jumping, and a fairground. Anglesey really is a fantastic place to go and visit it is picturesque and full of interesting things to do and see.

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        20.03.2003 02:30
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        I have to admit that even though I am half Welsh and love Wales and the Welsh people I am not a whole-hearted supporter of the Welsh language. I do appreciate the language, which I consider to be incredibly beautiful and lyrical and believe me singing the national anthem in a full Millennium stadium is a fantastic experience. Its just that sometimes people can try too hard to preserve something. The present Assembly policy is way over the top – Welsh is compulsory at school up to 16, signs have to be in English and Welsh to the extent that towns which have always had English names have had Welsh translations, official letters and publications are all in both languages, and anyone phoning the police, a local authority, a hospital, college or government department is met with a long drawn out greeting in English and in Welsh. I believe the language is strong enough to survive without the positive discrimination, which can actually have the opposite effect. The cost of implementing this policy must be horrendous and can only deter rather than encourage investment. Having said that, one of my favourite places to visit in Wales is the beautiful Isle of Anglesey which happens to be one of the main strongholds of the Welsh language. Known to the Welsh as Ynys Môn it is Britain’s largest offshore island Situated off the north-west coast of Wales near the beautiful Snowdonia mountain range, it is separated from the mainland by the treacherous Menai Straits, which is spanned by two marvels of engineering, Thomas Telford’s elegant suspension bridge and George Stephenson’s Britannia Bridge. During the middle ages Anglesey was known as Mam Cymru ('Mother of Wales') because its fertile fields were the granary for the much of North Wales. Even today the remains of many windmills are evident as you travel across the island and there is still one working example. Its attraction to me is in the fact that it is totally diff
        erent from the rest of North Wales. Heathland, marshlands and pasture range gently westward, interrupted by copses shaped by the wind and villages made up of small pebble dashed cottages battered by the winter winds which sweep up through the island. By way of contrast, Snowdonia acts as a wonderful backdrop to this lovely island, a beautiful panorama spread out along the length of its east coast. Anglesey has a rich tapestry of history and has its fair share of historical sites ranging from Neolithic times through to the industrial revolution. The first evidence of humans dates back to about 7000 BC and there are numerous stone burial chambers, standing stones, and hill forts, many of which survived the ages in good condition and can be still be seen today. It also has a fascinating association with smuggling evidence of which can be seen in the idyllic fishing villages dotted around the coast. The island has a multitude of areas where interesting birds, plants and other wildlife can be seen and enjoyed. With over 100 miles of coastline there are loads of different habitats, such as sand dunes, cliffs and beaches, salt marshes and mud flats. These provide homes for a wide variety of animals and also a varied flora. Inland much of the island is low lying agricultural land, dotted with the remains of windmills which drove the rural economy in the 1800’s and parts of Anglesey are flooded and marshy, providing for another alternative set of plants and animals. Much of Anglesey’s shoreline has Heritage Coast or ANOB status, an exciting succession of dunes and estuaries, coves and cliffs haunted by sea birds and a geologist’s paradise of complex rock formations. Around every corner there are glorious sandy bays reminiscent of Enid Blyton’s ‘Famous Five’ novels. Particular favourites of mine are: Plas Newydd - a magnificent early 19th century gothic mansion set in sloping parkland with f
        antastic views over the Menai Straits and the Snowdonia Mountains. Beaumaris – surely one of Wales’ most attractive towns with Victorian terraces, half timbered houses and a technically perfect mediaeval moated castle. Cemaes Bay – picturesque stone quay, beautiful sandy beaches and lovely cliff walks, even the nearby power station has a certain charm about it. It looks like a 20th century castle! South Stack - Towering over the lighthouse, the cliffs at South Stack annually provide thousands of seabirds nooks and crannies on which to raise their young. The greatest number of the birds are guillemots, with razorbills and kittiwakes also being numerous. A small colony of puffins also nest in their burrows above the cliffs. The vegetation on the wind-swept cliff top is mainly heather, but a beautiful display of maritime wildflowers colour the area in the summer. Newborough Warren – this is a lovely nature reserve covering 1500 acres of open dunes packed with herring gulls, oystercatchers, lapwings, curlew, skylarks and meadow pipits and home to an abundance of toads and lizards. Rhosneigr - On the West coast of the island, this location is a great place for surfers and watersports interrupted during the week by the roar of fighters from the nearby RAF Valley, an experience in itself. Lovely spot to visit at weekends in the early summer before it gets busy, beautiful bays, beaches and sand dunes to ramble over. On the downside.... Apologies to anyone reading from Holyhead, but this really is the one place to avoid. The island's biggest and busiest town, it is a thriving port and just an hour and a half by ferry from Ireland. Three or four years ago an economic survey rated Holyhead as "the most depressed town in Britain". I understand significant efforts are being made to change its image, but this will take time and a great deal of investment. Llanfairpwl
        lgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch – The village with the UK’s longest place name. When translated into English, it means "The church of St. Mary in a hollow of white hazel near a rapid whirlpool and near St.Tysilio's church by the red cave". The name was actually coined in the nineteenth century to attract tourists to the Island – an advertising campaign todays promos would have been proud of! It is abbreviated to Llanfairpwll or Llanfair P.G. by the locals. To be honest the sign is about all there is to it, but its still one of the naff things you have to do when you visit Anglesey – have your photo taken (wide angle lens of course) alongside the railway station sign. Two opinions for the price of one, a thumbs up for Anglesey but a thumbs down for the Welsh Assembly’s costly attempts to preserve the Welsh language.

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          09.09.2002 19:29
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          North Wales is an undervalued place by us English. My town lies twenty miles from the Welsh border in Cheshire (farm country) and it takes about one hour to get to Anglesey, which was my destination. I had never been to Anglesey before and I was semi-excited by the prospect of venturing to an unknown island which lies off the coast of Wales. When one thinks of Wales, images of coalmines and miserable faces crop up. I never saw a coal mine or the remnants of one but the Welsh do look bloody miserable. I am not being harsh but every face I saw looked liked it wished it were some place else. This is a big shame because the Cambrian Mountains and North Wales is lovely and stunning in equal measure. I am sure it can get depressing in winter (like all places) but I visited in the height of summer, when there were blue skies and beautiful lush green hills and looming mountains. It is in my firm belief that the Welsh folk need to cheer up. I am told that North Wales is filled with tacky and dirty holiday resorts, which compared with where I stayed sounds ghastly and even untrue. Anglesey is beautiful even if the locals are weird looking. I am sorry if this comes off as offensive or rude but the islanders have a certain familiarity in each face (to put it bluntly they look inbred). The island is fairly big but every person or shop seemed to be named Jones, Evans or Robinson. Anglesey is a lovely and picturesque place in summer, the lovely cottages and sailing boats on the Irish Sea are very pleasing on the eye. I was amazed that I had never been here before. Driving around the country lanes I imagined the place to be like "The Wicker Man" or "The League of Gentlemen" and by the end of the day I would be burned to death on a hilltop by the locals. The first place we visited was Moelfre, which is a tiny village in the North East of the island and i kept making jokes about "Are you local?" from "The League of Ge
          ntlemen" to my brother and sister who came to Anglesey also. The water was blue and the lifeguard centre is a nice five minutes. Look at the boats and make a donation to the lifeguard house. From Moelfre we went to Newborough which is on the other side of the island in the south-west. Newborough is a pine forest and is very, very remote. A few farmhouses and mansions are scattered around but not a lot else. Newborough is a lovely pine forest, which leads to the truly magnificent Llanddywn Island. The island can only be reached at low tide so go at noon and you will be able to visit the 570 million year-old molten rock that created the island. Llanddywn Island used to be inhabited by people. I found this remarkable because it is very remote and barren looking. Once you get to the island after a long walk on a beach, the hills, which look uninviting, become green and purple (due to the heather). The island is covered with little beaches and craggy rockpools. The are ruins from a centuries old church called St. Dywnn's or something like that and a Celtic cross, which is also very old. The island is linked very closely with the Irish and Celtic religion. Some people even speak Gaelic on the island. The lighthouse is perched on a piece of rock that stretches out toward the sea. A cross that was erected in 1465 sits proudly on a hillside looking out to the Irish Sea. In the distance the Cambrian Mountains sit towering above Canaerfon. The natural colours of the land are breathtaking, the blue sea, the white sand, the whitewashed lighthouse and abandoned cottages, the green and purple grass all adds up to a unbelievable delight. I was walking around and kept muttering to myself that this was "beautiful". I sat on a hillside overlooking a small bay and watched a group canoeing and then a guy roared past on a jet ski. I could not equate all of this with Wales but it is all here for people to enjoy. The weather was g
          lorious and I sat for ages on a hillside and found myself at peace or even harmony with my surroundings (note I am not a hippie or a Wicca or anything like that). Landdwyn Island is a beautiful spot when the sun is shining and everything is nice and harmonised. It probably is the most depressing place on earth in winter. After this we went home through Snowdonia National Park which an incredibly nice place apart from the quarried slate mountains which are ugly and miserable looking. Llanberis pass snakes through the mountain range and is a pleasant drive. We stopped off at Swallow Falls which I was very unimpressed with (foaming water and a few rocks do not constitute a waterfall or a £1 admission price). I went home with fond memories of Anglesey and Llandwyn Island I hope you visit the places I have mentioned because they are nice and so is North Wales.

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            30.07.2001 19:14
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            I have now returned from my week’s holiday on the lovely island of Anglesey. We had a great time and visited a lot of different places. I had a notebook with me to make any notes ready for my opinions when I got home! How sad is that? All week I kept saying – I feel an opinion coming on….. I’ll start with a general one on Anglesey itself, but I am sure it will be followed by detailed opinions about the various sights that we saw, and things that we did. The Isle of Anglesey is separated from the north west coast of Wales by a stretch of water called the Menai Straits, and is reached by one of two bridges, either the Britannia Bridge which carries the A55 and the railway or the Menai Suspension Bridge built by Thomas Telford. There is about 125 miles of coastline around Anglesey all of which are designated Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. I will take you on a virtual tour of the island so sit back and enjoy the ride. As we reach the island we will turn right and travel around the perimeter anti clockwise. The first village is a place called Menai Bridge, obviously named after the bridge connecting Anglesey with the mainland. It is a pretty little village with a few shops and a pub or two. We didn’t actually stop in Menai Bridge at any time so I have no more information than that I am afraid! Next is the town of Beaumaris, with its castle, gaol and museums. There’s a fair bit to do and see here from a walk around the castle ruins to a trip on a pleasure boat around Puffin Island, off the most easterly tip of Anglesey. We spent a couple of half days here and there is enough to say about the town to warrant a complete opinion on Beaumaris itself, which will be forthcoming soon. Suffice it to say here that it is well worth a visit. There are some nice walks to be had in and around the town and there are plenty of nice tea-rooms and pubs for refreshment too. Travellin
            g on we reach Red Wharf Bay and Benllech. These are two lovely sandy bays – with the sort of sand that’s great for building sand castles – the cliffs provide shelter from either side, and the sand shelves gently into the water. All in all an ideal place to take the children to play. Moving on again, we reach the little village of Moelfre. This is another place that we just passed through being as it is a collection of houses and accommodation. There didn’t seem to be too much else here at all. The next stretch of coastline we pass through is the North Anglesey Heritage Coast. Unfortunately the road runs a few miles inland so we don’t get to see the spectacular views. This coast is a collection of bays and the two small towns or Amlwch and Ceames. Our next stop is Holyhead at the extreme west of the island, which is the ferry terminal for traffic to Dublin and Dun Laoghaire. We tried to walk down to the docks to see the ferries but it isn’t possible to get very close at all, so we walked on and along the promenade, flanked by lawns and gardens. There is quite a busy town here with one or two supermarkets on the outskirts where you can fill your petrol tank at a good price! We returned here a couple of times during our stay to eat at a pub on the seafront at the north end of the town. For the life of me I can’t think what it was called! Now why didn’t I make a note of it? Dave has just taken up the challenge and found the answer on the Internet – it was called The Boathouse and is a hotel as well as a pub and restaurant. Thanks, Dave! There is a nice drive from Holyhead to the car park at South Stack. From here you can see the rocks and the lighthouse down below, and if you’re feeling energetic you can walk down to the lighthouse for a visit. We didn’t do this as we were with my parents for whom the climb back up would have been too much – that’s
            my story and I’m sticking to it! The views from the top are fantastic so it is worth the short drive from Holyhead even if you only have a short walk from the car park to the edge and back. This is the start of the coastline known as the Holyhead Mountain Heritage Coast. The next place we reach as we travel south along this coast is Trearddur Bay, which is a traditional seaside town with a beach nestling between cliffs with rocks and the inevitable rock pools, and plenty of gift shops and cafes. We stopped here for a cup of tea after admiring the lovely views across the bay and the town had a lovely holiday atmosphere. Travelling south again we come to Rhosneigr (don’t ask me how you pronounce half of these!) with safe sandy beaches stretching all around the bay. We reach the Aberffraw Bay Heritage Coast next, leading down to Malltreath Bay on the edge of the nature reserve covering Newborough Forest and the adjoining sand dunes. We then turn to travel east along the south coast of Anglesey where we find the Model Village, which was fairly good, but when you’ve seen the likes of Godshill on the Isle of Wight and Babbacombe Model Villages it spoils you for any of the others! The Tal y Foel Riding Centre is the next stop and this is where we stayed at the bed and breakfast – it was brilliant and I shall do a full opinion about this one! Foel Farm Park, which is a farm where you can feed the baby animals and generally learn about nature and farming, in next. We didn’t actually visit this, as it’s not really our cup of tea so I can’t comment any further on it. The Sea Zoo is next and although we intended to visit, we never actually got round to it! The guidebook boasts various sorts of sea creatures, plus the chance to see how sea salt is made and an adventure playground and shipwreck. Maybe on our next visit? The final place on the tour around the coast is Plas Ne
            wydd where James Watt’s 18th century house stands with magnificent views over the Menai Straits to Snowdonia beyond. The house contains Rex Whistler’s largest painting and an exhibition about his work. That completes the tour around the coast but there are one or two more places inland that are worth a mention. Towards the north west of the island there is a working windmill called Llynnon Mill, which was restored and opened to the public in 1984. It produces stone ground flour for sale and there is a teashop selling home made cakes. Having told you all this I should now say allegedly, as it isn’t open on Mondays and guess which day we went? The windmill itself is lovely but of course the sails were still, oh well, I guess it made taking the photograph easier! Just north east of Llynnon Mill is the Llyn Alaw Nature Reserve, set around the reservoir. We came here after visiting the mill only to find that there are no facilities here so we just walked down to the water’s edge and back to the car as we were in desperate need of a drink by then. There are plenty of walks around the area and various hides where you can watch the wildlife undisturbed. The final town to mention (if you can that is) is Llanfairpwllgwngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch - try saying that after a tube of wine gums! The railway station here has the old sign for the obligatory picture taking sessions, and there is a large store based around the railway theme selling all sorts of clothes and gifts together with a lovely tea room selling home made cakes. There is also an excellent chip shop opposite the railway station! You will now be able to tell, having read this opinion with its oft-mentioned tea-rooms, why I put on half a stone during the week we were away! Anyway that’s a whistle stop tour of Anglesey for you. I’ll do further more detailed opinions on the best places to visit later, this was j
            ust to whet your appetite!

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              07.04.2001 01:32
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              Anglesey, I love the place! But I have to say that I'm very biased as I've lived there all my life. There's not much along the lines of nightlife, but if you like the relaxed beauty of the countryside then this is the place to go! Anglesey, or Ynys Mon if your welsh, has a vast and varied history, which is displayed around the island. There's a nature reserve, several very clean beaches, many nature walks along the cliffs, many small villages that haven't changed since the 19th century, castles, stately homes, all around the island people are involved in a variety of water sports from surfing to sailing. If you like the hussle and bussle of city life, then Anglesey I must say is the complete opposite. Time seems to go a lot slower and the people are a lot more relaxed, and have time for the chat on the corner, the trip to the shops, or the cup of tea with the neighbor.

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              13.02.2001 22:57
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              Anglesey is a very nice place.... try Harbour Hotel Cemaes, nice beer - two pint glasses, etc Stag also, Cemaes. Benllech used to be a good place but has become a bit infested of late... for a pint, try Breeze Hill Hotel.. or further down the coast try St Davids Caravan club, beach, nice club.... Llangefni, Market hotel in the squareIf you want really touristy stuff try Llanfairpwllgwyngyllchwyrndrobwllgogogoch, Pringles, old people and knitting stuff.... Holyhead is a dump, but ferry for access to Ireland & Dublin...

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