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Salisbury in General

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Salisbury (pronounced 'Solsbree' or 'Sauls-bree') is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. The city itself forms the largest part of the Salisbury district. It is also sometimes called New Sarum to distinguish it from the original site of settlement at Salisbury, Old Sarum. A native of Salisbury is known as a "Sarumite". In 1990 Salisbury was twinned with Saintes in France, and in 2006 with Xanten in Germany. The city is located in the south-east of Wiltshire, at the edge of Salisbury Plain.

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      27.08.2009 13:40

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      have enjoyed living there my whole life

      Salisbury is a medieval market town in the South of England. Central to the city is the market square which hosts a market day every Tuesday and Saturday aswel as local farmers markets and French markets. The market square is surrounded on two sides by cafes and pubs with outdoor seating areas which are always busy with locals and tourists. The architecture of Salisbury makes it a very interesting town with the small cobbled streets of Butcher Row and the grand Salisbury Cathedral Close providing tourist attractions. It is easy to get to with the Wilts and Dorest bus station and a railway station at the top of Fisherton Street. Shopping in Salisbury is good for small shops/delis/cookery shops/jewellery shops as well as the high street department store Debenhams/M& S and the usual supermarkets. For drinkers, Salisbury provides a huge array of pubs, from traditional country and old fashioned pubs such as the Haunch of Venison (home to a mummified hand) to trendy bars and nightclubs.

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      18.06.2009 12:45
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      Fabulous city that deserves more than a drive through on the way somewhere else

      I have lived near Salisbury for ten years now and I never fail to get excited by the city.

      It is a city that has stunning architecture, lovely Cathedral and amazing views. There are fabulous walks all around the city - try Elizabeth Gardens where you can walk around to the Mill Hotel and along the way visit the exact stop where Turner painted his iconic view of Salisbury Cathedral.

      There are lots of places to eat and drink in Salisbury including pubs, coffee bars, fast food take outlets and hotels with restaurants.

      The accommodation is varied from B&Bs in the way into Salisbury to hotels such as The red Lion, The White Hart (part of the Mercer hotel chain) and on the outskirts of Salisbury a Premier Travel Inn. Personally if my friends decide not to stay with me they often choose a B&B probably closer to Stonehenge which gives them access to Salisbury but the option to enjoy the countryside.

      The cathedral grounds are divine in summer and spring and it is nice to get a take away sandwich or such and go and sit in the grounds and watch the world go by. Unfortunately the Cathedral seems to be perpetually in
      scaffolding at some point so choose a view where this is obscured.

      The Salisbury Museum which is in Salisbury Close is am amazing place and well worth a visit. Allow for a few hours though as there is so much crammed into the medieval building that you don't want to miss a thing. It is truly a treasure trove of exhibits.

      Stonehenge is about 14 miles from the Centre of Salisbury with the best route being the A345 from Salisbury to Amesbury. It is worth it whether you decide to go into the Stones (which costs around £6 on average per person) or just drive past it. You can also walk to the outside of the stones following the old ancient route of the Valley of the Kings. You can access this from countess Roundabout by using the underpass then cutting through using the Byway which is on the left hand side. This is well worth it, takes about 2-3 miles but is a stunning way to approach the stones.

      There are a variety of shops including all the main chains and key supermarkets. The speciality shops are the best and you can find them tucked away from the main drag. The bookshop in the Cross Keys is well worth visiting. They offer superb service and a great range particularly of local history books.

      The local home brewers shop is worth a visit even if you don't plan to. Great stories and chats with the locals can be found in there.

      There is a local market every Tuesday and Saturday which is where you can find almost anything you need or want. This is a historic market that has been around for more than 800 years although the traders have changed - slightly.

      The biggest drawback with Salisbury is the traffic especially on a Saturday or early and late weekdays with people trying to get home.

      You could try and avoid this by using one of the many Park and Ride services placed at all main arteries into Salisbury.

      Salisbury has a fairly efficient train line which makes it only an hour and a half to London Waterloo. There is also roughly the same time to get to Exeter if you get the Express train.

      House prices are fairly high for what you get however this is probably reflected in the fact the population is not very transient so there is not much option to move and has an older population. It is also indicative of the fact that people travel for their work.

      Wages are variable depending on what you want or can do. Temporary and Administrator work is plentiful due to some key organisations such as Friends Provident and Capita based there.

      Overall, I would be hard pressed to move from Salisbury. There are always events on with the annual Arts Festival, the Playhouse and City Hall host some key names in entertainment. The outlying countryside has filled many a weekend for my family with walks, fishing and trekking.

      Salisbury has major issues with the traffic and the fact there is no bypass road makes it unappealing for people to stop and visit often however please persevere. You will love it when you see it and will definitely want to come back again.

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      12.04.2008 17:17
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      Excellent place to visit

      Salisbury in a city in Wiltshire, approx 1.5 hours from London by train and is a beautiful place to visit any time of the year.
      Whatever you look for when choosing a place to visit for a day or longer, I am covinced that Salisbury has something for everyone.
      Surrounded by rolling green countryside it is a picturesque and calm place to visit.

      The river Avon flows through Salisbury and there are many countryside walks that take you along it with plenty of pubs in the town to have a drink or meal it and sit by it.

      The town has an impressive number of shops suitable for old and young alike. The Old George Mall boasts olde english gift shops packed traditional English products such as chutney and jam and more modern shops such as M&S.

      A short walk from the high street is the Cathedral and Sarum College. The 750 year old cathedral has the tallest spire in England and has a museum containing the Magna Carta inside and offers tours of the cathedral for a small donation. It is set in beautiful grounds that are perfect for a picnic.
      The historic houses in The Close that surround the cathedral include the house of Sir Edward Heath, former PM which is now open for public viewing.

      There is plenty of accomodation in Salisbury for all budgets. Most of the pubs offer accomodation and there are ample hotels too but these can be pricey. For those on a budget there is a Youth Hostel located 10 minutes from the cathedral that offers cheap rooms and meals.

      For days trips, close to Salisbury is the historic site of Stonehenge, open with tours in different languages to see the historic stones.

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        28.04.2001 07:10
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        Travel broadens the mind. Over the years it has been one of my favourite pastimes. I particularly enjoy visiting places of historical interest, walking around, and soaking up the local atmosphere. I enjoy discovering the past and I am intrigued as to what happened many years ago. Whether it is on holiday abroad, or in our own country –it has always fascinated me. Salisbury is one of many cities in the country that I have visited. It was also the name of the capital city of the former African State of Southern Rhodesia where I spent five years of my early childhood life. Today marks the anniversary of an important historical event in Britain’s version. It was here 781 years ago on the 28th April 1220 that the foundation stones were laid creating the city of ‘New Sarum.’ During a visit to the city with my younger brother, who lived with me in Southern Rhodesia, we strolled around the streets of Salisbury whilst reminiscing our previous childhood life in the African state. We managed to park our vehicle on a car park close to the open-air market in Market Place. The market days are Tuesday and Saturday. Buildings of all descriptions surrounded this wide space. Apparently it has been the commercial centre of Wiltshire since the 13th century. We were told of the medieval bustle that exists today on market days or by walking through the little streets of Fish Row, Butcher Row and Oatmeal Row behind the square. The women folk shopped whilst younger brother and I explored. We strolled along Queen Street and noticed Watson’s China shop which had been formed from the houses of two medieval merchants. Behind the Guildhall, we turned right into Fish Row, a pedestrian area of small shops and inns, to the 15th century Poultry Cross at the end of Butcher Row. This is great place to see all the tangled streets of Salisbury. Poultry Cross is a building of old grey stone dating back to 1335 when i
        t was one of four market crosses in the city. As the name suggests, poultry was sold here, but now all different kinds of goods can be purchased from this building that shelters street traders on wet market days. A short distance away along Minster Street you will see The Church of St Thomas Becket constructed in the 15th century and appears to be more glass than wall. Inside you will find the Doom painting from that era. It depicts the day of judgement where Christ is seated on a rainbow with the New Jerusalem behind him. Apostles, angels and righteous people surround him, whilst Satan ushers the remainder into the jaws of Hell. We looked at each other, left hastily, and continued along Silver Street into High Street. You will find some of the city’s oldest buildings here. The Georgian House of Steps is a National Trust bookshop and The Bay Tree Restaurant incorporates an inn built around 1314. We continued through High Street Gate with its battlements, shields, royal coat of arms and small latticed windows. This was part of the original defences to ‘The Close’ in which direction we were heading. I believe the main purpose was to defend the clergy from irate citizens who objected to their servants being allowed first choice at the market stalls. Outside the gate there are two 14th century timber houses and a 15th century Church House where you will find ‘Beach’s Bookshop.’ From this gate you will see the spire of Salisbury’s landmark ‘The Cathedral of St Mary the Virgin.’ Carry on through the gate into ‘The Close’ and on the right is ‘Mompesson House’ that dates back to the early 18th century. It is beautifully decorated and contains paintings, portraits, furnishings and collections of glass and china. A marble chimneypiece and carved wood overmantel was added to the drawing rooms around 1740. It is open daily with an admission charge. Tel.01722.3356
        59. Many fine buildings line ‘The Close’ and if you look back to High Street Gate you will see the statue of Edward V11. To the left of the gate you will see The College of Matrons, a home for the widows of the clergy. It is believed that Sir Christopher Wren designed it. Other buildings include, The Bishops Palace dating back to 1220 - which is the Cathedral School and 17th century Walton House - where the painter John Constable stayed whilst reproducing paintings of the cathedral. Walk along West Walk until you arrive at ‘The Wardrobe’ which was built around 1250. The house contained documents and robes’ belonging to bishops and that is how it got the name. It has been restored over the years and is now the museum of The Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Regiment. It contains weapons, uniforms and battle paintings. It is open most of the time and there is an admission fee. Tel.01722.336222. You will eventually arrive at ‘Kings House’ formally known as Sherborne Palace until King James 1 took lodgings there. It is now the Salisbury and Wiltshire Museum and features a 4000-year-old burial, pottery, tools, weapons and a Roman mosaic pavement. You will also be able to find out all there is to know about Stonehenge. It is open all year and there is an admission fee. Tel.01722.332151. Walk across the green to Salisbury Cathedral. If it was today you could imagine the foundations being laid by Bishop Poole all those years ago. The main part of the cathedral took another 38 years to complete. During the next 70 years, the cloisters, tower and spire were added, the latter being some feat of engineering when you consider that it weighed 6400 tons and is supported by a single vault at the crossing of the nave. Inside you will find tall windows and pillars reaching up to the vaulting. There is a shrine of St Osmund, an attraction for pilgrims in the Middle Ages and the tomb of William Longs
        pee, one of the founders of the cathedral and witness to the sealing of Magna Carta There is also a faceless clock within the cathedral that has only had an 80-year rest since it first began ticking in 1386. It is considered the oldest clock in Britain and probably the world. It is estimated that it has ticked in excess of 500 million times! Leave the cathedral and walk along North Walk where you will see many more buildings including The Salisbury and Wells Theological College. Carry on until you reach Malmesbury House at the junction with St Anne Street Gate. This is another house within The Close and one of the most attractive. You can view it through ornate iron gates. A further gate leading to the garden bears the golden inscription ‘And here Cabbages be Kings’ I have often wondered what that meant. Turn left into Love Lane and along Trinity Street where you will find Trinity Hospital. It is a charity founded in 1379 by Ann of Bottenham, a brothel keeper, who repented of her ways. She left all her money to this cause and the premises were used for weary travellers who were offered 3 days food and lodgings. It was rebuilt in the 18th century and now houses elderly men. The chapel is open on few occasions and contains an altar made from a chest brought back from the crusades. Walk along Brown Street and left into Milford Street passing the 18th century Red Lion Hotel. Cross over Catherine Street into New Canal that used to be a ditch. Here you will see ‘The Odeon’ the foyer of which was a 15th century house owned by a wool merchant named John Halle. He was the mayor of Salisbury on several occasions and later became a Member of Parliament. Continue into Butchers Row and back to the car park. The foundations of the cathedral were laid to replace the original building on a hill 2 miles to the north of the city. It was designed in such a way that priests lived in houses around the church as opposed
        to living within it. This original site was once a British Encampment and the Romans made it into a fort and called it ‘Sorbiodunum.’ It later became known as ‘Old Sarum.’ Some time later the inhabitants of ‘Old Sarum’ migrated to the new cathedral city of ‘New Sarum’ or Salisbury, as we know it today. The new cathedral and the city that grew up around it had their differences and the gates between are still closed each night. Salisbury is a cathedral city on the rivers Avon, Bourne, Nadder and Wylie It is the county town of Wiltshire where most of the streets are laid on a rectangular plan. The ‘Old Sarum’ can be found off the A345 - 2 miles north of the city. It is open all the year round and there is an admission fee. Tel.01722.335398. The woman folk appeared with their shopping bags and smiling faces and we all had an enjoyable day This is how I remember Salisbury although it may have changed slightly since I was there. It seemed appropriate, given my own personal circumstances and the anniversary of foundations to write about this city. I hope you have enjoyed reading it that it will be useful to you should you decide to visit the city of Salisbury. The Tourist information Centre can be found on Fish Row. Tel.01722.334956. Roads to Salisbury: A.36 from Bath. A.338 from Bournemouth. A.343 from Andover A.30 from Shaftesbury. Thanks, Peter2670

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          01.07.2000 14:52
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          I am fairly certain I can guarantee you a full day of leisure if you choose to visit my home town of Salisbury in Wiltshire. The city of New Sarum is probably most famous for its cathedral with its 404 foot spire being the tallest in England. Inside the cathedral you will find a copy of the Magna Carta and also the oldest clock in the UK - it has no hands or face but is still in perfect working order. Leaving the cathedral, you may like to visit the museum with its Roman mosaic, or wonder around the shopping centre. Here, try to look above the shop fronts to notice the original medieval architecture that still remains on many of the listed buildings in the city centre. On Tuesdays and Saturdays you will be able to visit the market which has been trading since medieval times. Or if you wish to buy a meal for lunch, you could choose no worse than checking out any of the many and varied inns scattered along many of the small streets leading away fom the town centre. Just outside the city, you may like to visit the iron age hillfort of Old Sarum, Salisbury's original location. Do not forget Stonehenge which is a mere 15 minutes away, or if ancient burial mounds and stone circles are not your scene, try the New Forest 20 minutes to the south. Salisbury's only sting in the tail is the traffic problem, especially on a Saturday... be prepared for a long queue into the city centre if you come by car.

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