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      10.12.2009 18:35
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      Pleasant Seaside Town in Pembrokshire - Definately worth a visit.

      -~-~-Tenby-~-~-

      -~-~-Forenote-~-~-

      Thanks for taking your time to read my review. It might be slightly long winded, emphasis on the slightly, but it includes everything that I would be looking for if I was wanting to visit the area. If you do not have the time to read the whole review, please do not rate.

      -~-~- Where are we?-~-~-

      Tenby is a seaside town in the south western tip of Wales, Pembrokeshire. The welsh name is Dinbych-y-Pysgod which means "The little town of the fishes". Tenby is part of the Carmarthen Bay in the south eastern part of Pembrokeshire. The town has a population of around 5000 people and is truly one of Britain's best coastal towns. Tenby is home to museums and is partly a castle in itself, with St Catherine's Tidal Island and it's fort, just alongside it. The town has been home to many writers, artists and even the inventor of the = sign, capturing the stunning scenery and excellent feel and atmosphere into paintings and books. At high tide Tenby has in total four different beaches, South, North, Castle and Harbour Beach. As the tides go out, the South Beach and the Castle Beach merge together. This is also the same with the North Beach and the Harbour Beach, creating another larger beach. One of the main things that people may remember Tenby for is it's vast array of coloured houses, completely transforming the view and feel of the town.

      -~-~- Brief History -~-~-

      The date that Tenby was built is unknown but there have been references of a settlement in the south Pembrokeshire area as far back as the ninth century. In the 13th Century the 1st Earl Of Pembroke built the town walls around Tenby which are still standing today, alongside the Five Arches Gate. The tidal Island, St Catherine's might at one point have been part of the main coastline, but in 1870 there was a Fort built on it which is still standing today.

      -~-~- North Beach -~-~-

      On many of our camping holidays we used to camp at a site located between Tenby and Saundersfoot, called Travayn. We used to take out at least one day every holiday to walk along the coastal path to Tenby and the first view of Tenby you get is of the North Beach and St Catherine's Island alongside the array of colourful houses. As soon as we could we used to make our way onto the North Beach and walk along to the Harbour and up into the town. We have also spent hours sitting on this part of the Beach, at the top end of the Beach furthest away from the town, usually deserted compared to the other Beaches. The disadvantage of this being that you haven't got as easy access to toilet facilities and if you want to waste money on Sunbeds and the vast quantity of "Bucket n' Spade" stalls then this is the wrong place to be. To the far north side of the harbour beach there are a lot of rock pools where the beach ends and meets the cliff, if your wanting to search the rock pools, make sure you bring some sandals or beach shoes because the rocks are full of barnacles. The North Beach is also the home to the very noticeable and prominent "Goskar Rock" which is simple a massive rock standing in the middle of the beach. I hadn't actually realised until I did a bit of research before I started on the review, that there is a Dog Ban on the north beach between the months of May and September. It's strange that I haven't noticed this before, but if your wanting to walk your dog between the months of May and September, North Beach isn't the place to do it.
      -~-~- Harbour Beach -~-~-

      The Harbour Beach is a very small patch of sand which sits between the town and the harbour. This beach is never touched by the incoming tide and it shows in the quality of the sand. The Beach is home to the Sailing Club and also offers convenient Toilets and a lot of "Bucket n' Spade" stalls. It is generally the most crowded Beach of the four although it is also the smallest. We haven't spent much time on this Beach because of the amount of people that are there and it is a bit inconvenient if you want to get to the sea, walking through the Harbour and out across the North Beach, distance varying depending on the tide, but it can be a long walk.

      -~-~- Castle Beach -~-~-

      The Castle Beach is another small Beach at High Tide. You could roughly say that it is the same size as the Harbour Beach when the tide is at it's highest, and this is the part of the day which you want to avoid the beach. Same as the Harbour Beach you can buy many different Buckets and Spades and rent Deck Chairs, also having a close Toilet if you find the need. Castle Beach is patrolled by a Life Guard in the Summer Seasons during the day and as the tide goes out you'll find an amazing stretch of beach which joins itself with the South Beach. It might be good to note that you can't walk between the South Beach and the Castle Beach during High Tide. Personally we have spent a bit of time using this beach but have always made sure we go during low tide when the whole of the beach is uncovered. This is also the beach which you will find the Boat Trips being launched from, trips to Caldey Island and generally just boat rides around the bay. The Castle Beach at low tide also creates access to St Catherine's Island and it's Fort although you can't actually get onto the island itself due to the cliffs, the only way is by taking a footpath which isn't open to the public.

      -~-~- South Beach -~-~-

      The South Beach is the largest of all four beaches and connects with the Castle Beach at low tide. The beach runs down the coast into the distance to Giltar Point and also has it's own car park, costing £2 per day. I haven't spent much time on the South Beach because of the fact that it is pretty far from the main shopping area of Tenby, although it does have toilets nearby it is a bit of a walk if your wanting any more than that. The South Beach has won a Tidy Britain Group Sea Award, which means nothing really to me as the other three beaches match it's quality.

      -~-~- Accommodation -~-~-

      Tents/Caravans - If your wanting to camp around Tenby there are only a few different sites which I would consider, at the top of the list Trevayn Farm Camping and Caravanning a bit up the coast from Tenby, which has stunning views over the bay. Unfortunately from where the tents and caravans are placed on this site you can't get a direct view of Tenby although if you walk to the bottom of the field you will get an amazing view over Tenby. Apparently legally they aren't allowed to have any Tents which can be seen from Tenby, which I think is pretty stupid. Trevayn is a farm and has some animals to watch, including horses and last time we went, Piglets. The owners are very welcoming, the Tarrifs are around £11-£16 a night for a family of four in a tent and pets are allowed.

      Static Caravan - If your wanting to rent a caravan, near Tenby, Kiln Park is the place to go. Kiln Park is a holiday site and has nearly everything you could want, pools, gold, cafe's, play areas, snooker tables, kid's clubs and a spa. The site is really friendly and you do get what you pay for. I really like this site because it is close to Tenby and has some very good facilities. Trevayn could be seen as a municipal site next to Kiln Park, but it really does show in the prices, reaching over £60 a night for some of the caravans.

      Hotels - If your coming to Tenby to stay in a hotel, I recommend going the full way and booking into Four Croft Hotel. It's located just up the hill from Tenby, right on the coast with an amazing view over Tenby itself. You couldn't get any better in terms of views, but again, you pay for it. It has it's own garden looking over the beach and offers free accommodation to children under 15 sharing with parents. A full welsh breakfast is provided and the majority of the 40 rooms overlook the bay. The staff are extremely friendly and helpful and there is no way I could fault the hotel. The prices are from £50 to £80 a night depending on the season.

      -~-~- Shopping -~-~-

      Over the many years that I've visited here, staying in a tent, we needed provisions, mainly food. There was a Summerfield in town centre, but last time we visited it had shut down and we had to drive for half an hour to find a suitable supermarket. They are building another supermarket in it's place and if I remember right it's open already. If not, there is a small Coop in Tenby along with a few other smaller food shops and fruit stalls. The rest of the shops in Tenby are generally geared towards the tourists with plenty of shops selling novelties and buckets and spades. You will also find a WHSmith, a Holland and Barrets, plenty of old book shops and bars around, a very good fishing shop and there used to be a Woolworths there as well. On a Wednesday and a Saturday there is a car boot sale just outside of Tenby which we visit every year, you will find nearly everything you are looking for here and I can guarantee you will not leave empty handed. Another of the highlights of Tenby is a small glass blowing shop, with the owner stood behind the counter making the glass objects that you buy, right in front of you!

      -~-~- What Can I do In Tenby? -~-~-

      There are many different places to visit in and around the Tenby area, I will try and concentrate on those in Tenby itself because the review is actually about Tenby! Other than the four main attractions I have explained below, there are day trips that you can do across Pembrokeshire which will take you to secluded beaches and castles.

      -~-~- Silent World Aquarium and Reptile Collection -~-~-

      If your an animal lover and your staying in Tenby this is one of the "Must" attractions. The Silent World Aquarium is housed in an old chapel which is very peaceful and tranquil. There are over 100 species of fish are on display, fish, crabs, sea stars, shellfish, the list goes on and on. They also have over 50 different snakes, lizards, frogs and spiders also on display, most of them you can touch and handle. Visitors are asked to park in the North Beach car park because there is nearly no parking around the aquarium itself. It's a 5 minute walk from the North Beach car park and they also say you can drop off passengers outside the Aquarium before heading off and parking. The upstairs area has no disabled access and there are no public toilets in the aquarium itself, although the staff do say that in emergencies there is the staff toilets. Prices are £3 for children, £5 for adults and £15 for a family of 4. There are also season tickets available. I've been over here twice now and it's a very enjoyable experience, being able to hold and touch most of the snakes and lizards.

      -~-~- Trefloyne Golf Club -~-~-

      For the golfers, this is a stunning course to play on, overlooking Tenby and the bay. The club is very posh and the prices match it as well, costing from £15 - £27 per round per person, depending on the time, person and season. The course will certainly test your golfing ability and the standards of the club are very high. There is a very strict dress code in place on the course, having to wear golfing shoes at all time, Jeans, Tracksuits, Football and Rugby shirts are all banned and you have to even tuck your shirt into your trousers! Club and bag sharing is strictly forbidden. Once you get past the rules you will really have an enjoyable time and there is a bar and restaurant available in the club house offering meals and snacks at average prices.

      -~-~- Quad Biking -~-~-

      Two minutes drive out of Tenby, you will find the Ritec Valley Quad Bikes, a massive 25km route for quad biking. If your under 16, a 30 minute ride with everything included will cost you £17.50 and for an adult with the same offer, £21.00. The prices are high, but on average it's a good price for quad biking. If you have the time to pop out here, it's definitely worth while checking out. The site is currently closed, reopening early 2010, there's WIFI points with no charge and you must watch out for the weather. In wet weather the routes may close down, talking from experience, if it's raining on the day which you have booked, phone up to make sure that the routes and site is still open or you might be disappointed when you arrive.

      -~-~- Fishing - "Tenby Fishing" -~-~-

      This is another of the activities which I would highly recommend from experience. Tenby Fishing is a company which takes people out on boats to fish just off the coast, generally looking for Mackerel. You don't need any experience at all and the staff on board will always be there to help you out if don't have a clue what your doing, like I didn't! It's open from May - September and there's a flat rate of £10 per person for a 90 minute trip. All equipment is provided, all you need to do is turn up on the day. The boat is limited to groups of smaller than 12 people, or the boat may sink! One of the main aspects that I loved about this fishing trip was that the skipper lets you keep all of the fish that you catch, or set them free if you want too. He will also demonstrate how to fillet and show you the best ways to cook the fish if your wanting too.

      -~-~- Eating Out -~-~-

      There is a wide choice of places to eat out in Tenby, from fish and chip shops to top quality restaurants, from £5 meals to £35 meals, Tenby has it all. At the bottom of the range, I would recommend Park Road Fish and Chip Shop, offering amazing chips, possibly the best in Pembrokeshire. The prices are average Fish and Chip shops. Of the various Pubs and Inns for a meal I would recommend the Crown Inn, although it doesn't have a good view of the sea, it's warm and friendly and offers some decent prices. The average meal at the Crown Inn will set you back £10, these range from lasagne to battered cod and different curries. At the top of the range in restaurants, if you have the money to splash out at the Blue Ball restaurant, the average meal will cost you £35. It has a large and varied menu from traditional, sea food and European dishes.

      -~-~- Overall -~-~-

      Overall my experiences of Tenby are very good, I don't know much of the night life because that isn't really my sort of thing. There is a lot to do around Tenby and it really does have the pleasant seaside town feel too it. There are other places you can visit around the coast of Tenby, secluded beaches, caves and coves, days out and much more.

      -~-~- More Information -~-~-

      Here are the websites of some help sites for Tenby, extra information and the websites of the Hotels, Camp Sites and Activities.

      Tenby In General - (http://www.virtualtenby.co.uk/)
      Tenby In General - (http://www.tenbyguide.com/)
      Travayne Camping - (http://www.camping-pembrokeshire.co.uk/)
      Kiln Park - (http://www.kilnpark.com/)
      Fourcrfot Hotel - (http://www.fourcroft-hotel.co.uk/)
      Silent World Aquarium - (http://www.silentworld.org.uk/)
      Trefloyne Golf Club - (http://www.trefloyne.com /Trefloyne_Golf_course_and_Country_Club.asp)
      Ritec Valley Quad Bikes - (http://www.ritec-valley.co.uk/)
      Tenby Fishing - (http://www.tenbyfishing.co.uk/)


      -~-~- Pictures -~-~-

      Here are some of my holiday Pictures which I have taken, they're on Photobucket. The link below will take you to one of my favourite pictures of Tenby, feel free to browse through as many of them as you want.

      (http://s749.photobucket.com /albums/xx134/Pete1993/?action=view&current=SouthSide.jpg) (All pictures are ©Pete1993)

      All content ©Pete1993.

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        09.11.2009 17:03
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        Amazing!! like a welsh haven

        Tenby is one of the best places in the world ... end of argument!

        Most people visit Tenby and the surrounding area in the summer months where you will find tourists spread along the North, South and Castle beaches or strolling around Tudor sqare enjoying cafe culture, browsing in local art and craft shops or just taking in some sun.

        This little welsh haven has all the activities you could posssibly wish for ... plenty of hotels and B&B, plenty of pubs including Tenby House, The Buckaneer and Hope and Anchor, restaurants such as The Mews and Baytree and activitys such as Trefloyne and Tenby golf Courses.

        For a cheaper holiday Kilm Caravan park is the place to stay with a large indoor pool area and only minutes away from the town centre ias suitable for kids and adults of all ages. For people wanting a more central stay the Tenby House Hotel offers great food, rooms and atmosphere being one of the more popular pubs too.

        If the sun is shining take a trip to Caldey Isalnd to see the monks or to heatherton to go-kart, golf or play many other sports.

        There is plenty to do in this small town and the locals are as friendly as you can get .. whilst here also enjoy the local villages of saundersfoot, narbeth or even use it as a base to explore st davids.

        A great place you will return to time andd time again!

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        09.08.2009 01:14

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        Fantastic holiday destination

        Have recently spent a week's holiday with the family in the lovely walled town of Tenby. Have visited many times before but this time we stayed in the town itself which meant we didn't have to deal with the traffic jams going into the town and finding somewhere to park every day. Plenty to do despite the weather being wetter than we'd liked so didn't visit Tenby's excellent North and South beaches everyday. Plenty of places around offering horseriding, quadbiking and a host of other activities and Oakwood Theme Park is definitely worth a day trip for all ages.
        Tenby has got loads of different restaurants and take aways, would particularly recommend the Plantagenet for a special dinner, also the Bay Tree but not so keen on the Blue Ball where the service and food was poor although suspect it may have been the Chef's night off (Sun).
        The best fish and chip shop has got to be Fecci's judging by the size of the queue outside when the ones next door are almost empty. We duly bought our from there and they were delicious. The Fecci family seem to have a stranglehold on Tenby as there many other outlets in the town bearing their name, from cafes to ice cream parlours. Their ice cream sundaes were great too although the £5.00 ones were too much for any one person so don't be as greedy as my children were.
        The boat trip over to Caldey Island is definitely worth doing, take some money to buy from the monastery fudge shop where you can see it being made and sample the goods!

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        12.07.2009 17:27
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        Great for holidays

        I visit Tenby a lot as my 13 year old daughter lives there and apart from the travelling for me, it is always a good place to go to. There are two excellent sandy beaches, one of which is part-harbour and the views from above are superb. There are many benches to sit and chill and the paving and landscaping has been updated in recent years to add to the ambience.

        It has a good selection of hotels ranging from large Fawlty Tower-esque Victorian to cosy B&B's. I recommend the Clarence for the younger and rugby crowd as it often has party nights and drinks offers. The main part of the town is set within medieval walls and quite pretty with lots of pubs and café/restaurants in close proximity. The nightlife is pretty lively at weekends and holidays though the clubs are just outside town a short cab ride away. Pubs I would recommend are the Tenby House and Lifeboat for the younger crowd and Five Arches for the "more mature" and families. The Baytree, Qube and China Garden are good places to eat, as is the Mews Bistro though a bit more expensive. Parking can be difficult in town in high season though.

        There are many boat trips from the harbour including visits to nearby Caldey Island. As well as the beaches and the Silent World aquarium there is the Ocean Commotion soft play centre for younger children. Outside Tenby they are also well catered for with the well-run Folly Farm, Anna Ryder-Richardson's Manor Park and Great Wedlock Dinosaur Park amongst others. For young and older kids there are Oakwood theme Park, Heatherton activity centre (karting, archery, golf etc), Coniston Bowl & Crystal Maze (like the TV programme) and the new Blue Lagoon wave pool. Older visitors may like the numerous castles (Pembroke, Manorbier, Carew) and gardens (Colby, Picton Castle) nearby. It is on the scenic Pembrokeshire Coastal Path also. Carew also has a buzzing boot sale and market on Sundays.

        I've had many a great weekend down there and I'm sure I'll have many more.

        Additional info : It's approx 240 miles from central London and costs £5.30 to cross the Severn Bridge (you pay Westbound only).

        Mail me if you need any more info . . .

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        08.07.2009 13:42

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        Holiday here

        I love Tenby, it has to be one of Wales' nicest seaside towns. There is plenty to do both around the town and in that particular area of Pembrokeshire. Tenby has several outstanding beaches, some of which allow dogs on even in the summer months.

        There are regular boat trips to Caldey Island which hosts a monastery. There are lots of different little shops and none of the seaside tat that you get in some of these places. Amongst the shops are some really lovely boutiques, furniture shops, surf shops and gift shops. This is a historic town, and the beautiful buildings pay testament to this. There are lots of eateries in Tenby, some of which are excellent some of which should be avoided (Plantagenet). Tenby has been pedestrianised (in the summer, day time only) in the last few years, which adds to its charm (although I'm not sure the locals would agree)!

        The choice of accommodation in Tenby is vast with many Hotels and Guesthouses. The nearest campsite is Kiln Park and there is a path which leads directly to the town centre. There are tens more campsites on the road into Tenby which are cheaper but not then within walking distance really.

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        03.06.2009 16:42
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        If you like the whole seaside town thing, this is about as good as it gets.

        With the way things are economically these days, the offer of a cheap holiday with some friends was just what i was looking for at the start of summer, and Tenby was our destination of choice. Despite being a mixed group ranging from age 7 to 40 we had a very chilled but never boring time. Tenby makes no secret of the fact that it's geared for tourism, but it's something that it pulls off without descending into 'tackyness'. It manages to maintain a 'cute' personality whilst at the same time offering a great selection of shops, places to eat and entertainment. The people of Tenby have clearly embraced their roles as hosts and seem to relish catering for the needs of their many guests.
        As far as night life goes, I've always been really impressed by Tenby. There is an endless supply of bars, pubs and restaurants to choose from, with highly pedestrianised areas linking them all. Trouble is kept to a minimum thanks to a 'no large groups' rule that many of the bars employ that really adds to the feeling of a nice night out.
        The surrounding area is littered with campsites for those who're game for a bit of camping - Newhedges being the site we chose and would highly recommend. There's also a wide choice of amusement venues including Oakwood amusement park, Heatherton sports park and the Canaston Bowling alley.
        Throw in many nice beaches such as Freshwater West and you couldn't ask for more from a seaside town.
        I do have to admit that my whole experience was probably enhanced by a mini heatwave, but thats true of any outdoors holiday.
        Well worth it for a week long holiday or even a long weekend away.

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          22.08.2008 12:00
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          a great place for all the family

          Oh i love tenby, i went there as a child, and loved the beaches, 4 years ago my partner booked us for a weekend in tenby, and i have to say it was the best weekend ever.

          Tenby wasnt what i remembered, it was much better. The town is pedestrianised during june-august, so parking can be difficult, but there are 3 car parks, so we've always been able to get into one of them. Parking is about £13 for a few days, so that pretty reasonable, the car parks dont have security thats the only thing.

          The town itself is very pretty, it has little quaint streets with cobbled streets, and makes you feel like youve stepped back in time. When the town is busy however, it does feel abit dirty and tacky, so i prefer it when the peak season has ended, as its very busy otherwise.

          There are some good shops in tenby, and you can get some very nice gifts, they also have a range of restaurants, some are very expensive but some a reasonable, check the prices on the outside first, my favourite is nanas, this is an italian restaurant which has views over the beautiful harbour, the food is great, but make sure you ask for an upstairs window.

          The town is very colourful with pink and pastel painted houses, and is a great picture postcard. The town is famous for its fish and chips, we did try these, they were nice but im afraid ive had better. Be careful of the seagulls though, as they swoop down and pinch you chips!

          There are many places to stay in tenby from hotels to guesthouses to apartments. We normally stay in a guest house, but after a very bad expereince we now stay in self catering apartments, which are probably more reasonable.

          Tenby is close to oakwood park, and hetherton, oakwood park is probably my favourite place, theres lots of rides etc. Hetherton has fishing, shooting, etc. and is very good, but very pricey!

          Overall i love tenby, its a lovelly town and one id throughly recommend

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            18.07.2008 20:38
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            A beautiful, small town with lots to offer!

            Tenby is a town situated in Pembrokshire, on the West Wales coast. It is a place I have been going for many years, whether it be as a child going there with my parents, as a drunken 20 something year old, enjoying the local nightlife, or as a Dad myself, taking my little boy on his first holiday.

            Tenby is a picturesque, fishing town, with golden sands, multicoloured buildings, fine restaurants and bars. But Tenby is much more than that, it is a central location for a wealth of surrounding attraction. From Oakwood theme park to Folly Farm, from Caldey Island to Skomer Island, there are too many days out to mention in Pembrokshire, and there's no better place to set base than Tenby.

            Tenby is a special place I have visited nearly every year since I can remember, and it is a place that I will continue to visit and enjoy with my new family, hopefuly for years to come.

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            01.11.2006 17:39

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            Oct 06Four days stay at the Atlantic Hotel, Tenby. Deluxe room overlooking South beach - going to sleep listening to the waves crashing on the shore.Fabulous food at the Cellar Bistro - melt in the mouth Beef Stefatho and a huge, delicious Shellfish Platter , followed by a dreamy choc pot- all served by very friendly staff.

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            09.04.2006 12:38
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            A lovely area with loads to do for everyone!

            I have been going to Tenby and the surrounding areas with my family every year since I was about 6 months old and I even took my first steps in our old caravan down there!

            From Birmingham it can take about 3 and half to 4 hours to drive there, but it is well worth the drive! hey I've even driven there first thing in the morning just to spend the day there and drive home in the evening!

            Tenby itself is one of the main big towns in Pembrokeshire, it is surrounded by other equally as nice smaller villages such as Saundersoot, Wisemans Bridge, Pleasant Valley, Amroth and Pendine. Those are the most popular tourist beach spots in the summer. I'll tell you abit about all these places as well as Tenby as they all help make it the beautiful place it is.

            Tenby

            As I've said Tenby is one of the main big towns in the area, it has a fantastic range of shops from your seaside pound shops and gift shops through to your regular high street shops, perfect for all the shoppoholics out there!

            In Tenby there are 2 beaches, North Beach and South Beach. Both are very big and have ammusements. South Beach offers boat trips to nearby Caldey Island where the monks live and other trips like fishing and bird spotting! North Beach has some history to it, which can be found out at either the local infomation point or to make it more interesting... there is a local horse and cart that runs frequently through the summer where the driver will be more than happy to tell you about the history of Tenby!

            There are plenty of places to eat out, ranging from fish and chip shops to sit in for a meal restaurant. If you are staying in the Tenby area there are loads of camp sites and caravan sites which are quite reasonable, however it can work out cheaper to stay out of the town center. There is also a supermarket on the edge of the town.

            Also for a little something to do, if you don't mind a walk up a very large hill, there is a lovely marina place to visit, its along the same lines of the Sealife centers. Or nearby just on the edge of town, there is a bird and Wildlife park which is also very nice and at a reasonable price.

            Saundersfoot

            Saunderfoot is a beautiful little village located about 7 miles from Tenby. There is plenty to do here, including an ammusement arcade, beach, a pretty harbour with a nice walk along and plenty of "seaside" gift shops.

            Wisemans Bridge/Pleasant Valley

            I've put these 2 together as they are side by side in location. They are about 10 miles from Tenby. Wisemans Bridge is a beach, until recently there was a pub and a shop there with a camp site, but this was closed due to a fire earlier this year, however they are due to re-open this month. Pleasant Valley is probably one of the best places to find a place to stay because as you drive up the road there are caravan sites and B&B's all the way up the road and quite a few of these offer camping facilities as well. There is also a small Craft village to visit which I understand is nice, but I haven't been to!

            Amroth

            Amroth is next along from wisemans bridge and is about 12 miles from Tenby. Amroth is quite a small, but yet again pretty area, it has a very long beach, which allows dogs on the very far end only. There are a few shops and a couple of pubs at the other end and there is a big caravan site about halfway along.

            Pendine

            Pendine is a massive beach which you can pay to take your car on. Becareful though it can wreck paintwork and the car itself due to the sand and salt on the beach! However me being me I take the car on there every year and so far I've only had one minor (could have been major!) problem! That was last weekend I went with my friend took the car on the beach, then the car got stuck in the sand, and dug itself in when we tried to move it, so we have me having a panic that my car was gonna get drowned on my birthday of all days and my mate telling me to calm down and she would try and dig it out! Thankfully she managed to dig enough to put things under the wheels so she could push it out of the soft sand! The sea does come in really quick here so do be caarefull! Also part of the beach gets closed off for MOD training that takes place. There are a few shops and places to stay here as well.

            In The Surrounding Area.

            Ok thats the main little villages out the way... so what else is there to do? LOADS!!

            There is a theme park about 20mins drive away called Oakwood. Oakwood has a large variety of rides for all ages, last time I went I think it was about £20 to get in and that includes all the rides with the exception of Vertigo. Oakwood has Europes largest wooden rollercoaster - Megafobia, and new for 2002 was the first vertical drop water ride... which I screamed all the way down on!!

            There is Folley Farm also nearby, this is a childrens farm where the kids can really get involved with almost everything, including feeding the animals. There are loads of displays going on at various times, and if you are in the pets corner at just the right time, you might even get to see a baby chick hatching! There are absolutly loads of play areas, which I have to admit I did spend a good hour playing on them last year and we didn't have any children with us!!

            On a Thursday and Sunday there are Markets and car boot sales. I'm not sue of the exact location, but if you follow the signs for Tenby and Narbeth and Arbeth they are well signposted!

            Nightlife I believe is good, I haven't sampled it myself, I tend to stick to the local pubs of wherever I'm staying.

            So there you have it, that is Tenby and its surrounding areas. There is quite a few more activitys to do, but as I haven't visited a lot of them I can't really tell you about them! However this is a great fun place to go for all ages. It can be quite cold at times, but in general through the summer the weather is quite good! I would definatly recommend going and paying this place a visit. Its far away but lovely!

            Talking about Tenby and the local area so much has made me want to go, so me and my partner are going to go after work tonight, go camping and come back tomorrow evening! Yay! I can't wait!

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              31.07.2004 02:24
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              • "mind that patch of 'water'"

              We've just got back from our holidays. For the first time ever I ventured further west into the Principality of Wales and we got as far as the seaside resort of Tenby. We were staying in a tent (yes, myself, Mrs Nolly and our two small children all cramped in a tent for five days!). The park we were staying at was a mile north of the town of Tenby, and I intend to discuss different facets of our trip.... The Journey ========== Well, we live in deepest darkest Herefordshire, and so we headed east towrds Brecon on the A438 and then on to the A40. The distance was 120 miles for us. If you are coming from the South, just keep on going to the end of the M4 and follow the signposts for Carmarthen, St Clears and Tenby! Our way meant we stopped for lunch in a very pleasant town called Llandeilo. The Park ======= The park we stayed at was called Wood Park. It caters for users of static caravans, touring caravans. motorhomes and tents, and you can have an electric hook-up if you so wish. We didn't and it cost £85 for the week, which is certainly cheaper then a B&B or a self-catering apartment in high season! There was a play park close to our tent, so our 4 year old loved it, but the youngest child wanted to make a break for freedom at every conceivable opportunity! The Town ======== The town looks very pleasant. I must admit I have a very jaundiced view, and I wish to explain why. We visited Tenby for the first time on the Saturday evening. We parked in the car park (the main car park next to South Beach is £2 per day), and walked down to the steps (access to the beaches is either by steps or walkways, they aren't at road level). I was just about to take Eleanor down a set of steps when I noticed a man standing there relieving himself of excess bodily fluid quite brazenly and in the middle of the steps! Needless to say I did not stay to thank the gentleman for his friendly gesture, and mo
              ved on. The town itself has three beaches - North, South and Castle. Of the three I would recommend South Beach, with its long stretch of golden sands. Each of the three beaches has lifeguards and the usual deckchair, lounger and parasol rip-offs, sorry, concessions. You can also buy ice-creams and other assorted refreshments. One word of warning, though. In the heat of the day (yes, we did have sunshine), the baby changing part of the public convenience at Castle Beach had obviously not been cleaned, and the resulting stench was on the nauseating side of disgusting, along with added flies! In terms of shops, there are the usual assortment of chainstores, as well as gift shops selling everything from windmills emblazoned with the Welsh dragon, to models of a VW camper van (don't ask me why!). For the food lovers among you, we sampled two fish and chip emporia, Fecci's and The Spinnaker. Of the two I would recommend the former, as it was slightly less greasy. There are lots of food and drink shops, pubs and restaurants, but my only recommendation would be to avoid a Saturday night if you are with a young family, as at 7pm the security guards were already stationed outside the pubs. For ice-cream parlours, Fecci's also has a very nice one. Excursions ======== Well, off the coast of Tenby is Caldey island, which has a monastery and a lovely beach. Boat trips are regular, but the return trip (40 minutes) won't give you much change out of £20 for a family of four. There are other trips, seal watching or just cruising around the bay. Nearby are some lovely beaches. If you want slightly touristy, there is Saundersfoot, which is a village 3 miles to the north. Again this has a lovely beach and all the amenities normally on offer in a seaside resort. Wynchwater Bay is glorious and can only be reached on foot. It has a sandy beach and lovely caves and rockpools at low tide. I like it because it has
              no refreshment stalls or deckchair concessions. We also visited Manorbier Beach and Castle, which is a few miles west, again it is much less commercialised and is reasonably sandy. Our absolute favourite was about one hour's drive away. On the headland to the west of Milford Haven is a piece of land owned by the National Trust. Maloes Sands is a gloriously unspoilt and beautiful beach. It is reach along a half mile footpath and is so beautiful I want to go back there tomorrow. It isn't a bucket and spade type of beach, rather a watch the waves rolling in kind of one. It also has a view of Skoholm island which, along with neighbouring Skomer, is home to a lot of birds including Puffins and Gannets. In Summer boat trips leave neighbouring Martin's Haven and if you want something a little quieter, this may well be for you. On the way back from Marloes, we stopped off at Pembroke Castle (£8 for the four of us, so good value), where we explored the birthplace of Henry VII, and it was a really nice place to visit. Overall Conclusion =============== So, I guess you could say that this area has something for everybody. It has the touristy beaches that a lot of people like. It has shops and outlets, and also offers things off the beaten track for those who prefer a bit more peace and quiet.

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                26.04.2004 06:20
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                Tenby is one my favourite seaside resorts that I have visited in the U.K. I first went there as a teenager and enjoyed many days there and recently re-discovered it ten years later. It is very popular and has become a bit of a haven for youngsters but it has lost none of it's charmful appeal. ~Location~ Tenby lies in Pembrokeshire which is a naturally beautiful area of the U.K. Pembrokeshire is still undiscovered compared to other areas and appears very wild with an accompaniment of National Parks and ragged coastlines. The M4 motorway finishes near Swansea and you will be signposted onto the A40 which runs through countryside straight into Tenby. The A484 coastal road, the A485 from Lampeter and the A478 from Cardigan are alternatives. Tenby has a train station with a direct route into Paddington, London and a bustling Bus service too. ~History~ Tenby had always been a fishing village in the Camarthen Bay until the Norman conquerors in the thirteenth century established Tenby as a Welsh out-post. The Welsh Princes took offence and ransacked Tenby several times which led to the town being fortified by strong walls, much of which have lasted until this very day. It wasn't until Victorian and Georgian times though that Tenby rose to it's current prominence. In Victorian times, it was thought that living by the sea in seclusion would cure various ailments and the wealthy and hard living Victorians invaded Tenby in numbers. They built rows and rows of beautiful houses complete with pretty rose gardens which can still be seen today and the town basically became a magnet for the rich. The town with the coming of the railways and the industrial revolution has grown in size but because of it's islolated location has never really been spoilt, something which the current authorities are keen to preserve. ~Climate, Beaches and Activities~ Tenby is considered to be in one of the mildest parts of the U.K altho
                ugh this of course is still somewhat lacking compared to it's foreign rivals. It is best to visit in the height of summer when the sun is hottest to get the best out of the beach facilities. Tenby has four beaches, North, South, Castle and Harbour. The South, North and Harbour all have blue flag awards for cleanliness although it is worth pointing out that there is a sewer outfall just a little up-coast from the South beach. The North beach is easily the most popular beach and has the best facilities. The South beach is the largest (2 km long) and has surfers, windsurfers and sailors using the sea there. All of the four beaches are manned by lifeguards. At low-tide Castle and South beach are connected and you can walk out to St Catherines Point. ~Accomodation~ Tenby has an abundance of Hotels of varying quality in the town itself. If your visit to Tenby is in the high season it is advised to book your hotel-room well in advance as the place can be very crowded indeed and nearly every hotel can fill up rather quickly. The bed and breakfast's do a roaring trade and Tenby has several holiday parks on the outskirts, I have stayed in one of the holiday parks and they are a great place for families to stay in particular. ~In The Resort~ Tenby has a really oldie-worldly appeal to it which gives it a charming and atmospheric feel. The town is very welcoming to tourists, something which is not always true of Welsh places to English visitors! The centre is filled with narrow lanes and cobbled streets very simular to Cornish seaside towns. All of the roads are on a decline leading down to the ancient harbour whose boats have been bringing wares to the town for centuries. Tenby is full of pubs, cafes, tourist shops and restaurants and it's a great idea to sample as many as possible! Tenby Castle and Museum lie at the top of the cliffs overlooking the harbour and tell the history of this picturesque little town. Down by the harbour
                , you will find boats offering a shuttle sevice to nearby Caldy Island which is home to a monastery and was once a Viking drop-off point for the pillaging of the Welsh coastline. You can also get aboard a fishing boat and spend a peaceful afternoon fishing if your that way inclined. One thing to mention if your visiting in high season is the difficulty in parking, if your staying on the outskirts or nearby and are travelling into Tenby via car it is a neccessity to get into town early as parking spaces are few and far between - all there is is a few in the centre and a medium sized multi storey plus a small car park near the South beach. ~Restaurants, Nightlife and Shopping~ Tenby has loads of restaurants to cater for the visiting hourdes. Two I would recommend are The Plantagenet House set in a 12th century Inn serving Welsh delicacies. The other being Pam Pam, part of a chain, serving great food and cheaper than most. While in Tenby you must try fish and chips, I had some of the best I've ever tasted in a place called Feccies. With regards to nightlife, Tenby has become a bit of a haven for people within a 30 mile radius. It gets very boisterous in the summer season and every town centre pub is heaped to the rafters with revellers. Lately is has also earned a reputation as a destination for stag and hen parties although this is looked down upon and denied by the very conservative local authority hehe. Shops wise it is slightly lacking but thats not a bad thing, the town centre has the usual high street names such as Boots, Woolworths etc and there is a big Somerfields near the multi-storey car park. The sea-front consist of art, craft and expensive specialists shops because you see a lot of the locals are quite well off and the town is still a very fashionable adress to have even though the Victorian era was a century ago! ~Further Afield~ The best known attraction nearby is Pembroke Castle which is about twenty minutes awa
                y, it is one of the biggest and best preserved Norman Castles in Britain. Kids will love Oakwood theme park about ten minutes from Tenby, it has rollercoasters and water rides and will easily take up a day of your time. Nearby resorts worth a look at are Manorbier and the unspoilt Saundersfoot which are both quiter and full of some quaint scenery and Inns. Further up the Pembrokeshire coastline lies Amroth, a permanently sleeping village resort where low-tide reveals an ancient forest and also Pendine Sands which is some ten miles long and where land speed records have been carried out in the past. Theres also Milford Haven and the Gower peninsula which offer some incredible sights at night with the illuminations of the gigantic oil refineries and the massive super tankers. ~Overall Impressions~ I love Tenby as if you haven't gathered. The place really comes alive in the summer and you can enjoy seemless days in the sun and evenings in the pubs and restaurants. It is particulary good for families as the town is littered with holiday parks which offer so much to do for the kids. It is very rare for such a popular resort to keep it's natural appeal intact but Tenby has managed to do so thus remaining appealing to the eye and a haven for enjoyment. It is full of colourful sights and architecture and is devoid of any sixties/seventies town-planners monstrisities. Because of it's secluded location it can be difficult to get to if you live in the North or South East but I suppose that's one of the reasons it still appeals today. I would recommend Tenby for people of all ages and theres quite enough to do for at least a week once there. In my opinion one of the best holiday destinations in the U.K. Tourist Information : 01834 842407 =========================== WormThatTurned2004

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                  31.03.2002 03:19
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                  Tenby is situated in Pembrokshire just after Saundersfoot, Amroth and Pendine on the glorious South Wales coastline. Although this review is to be about Tenby in the main I feel I will have to mention a few brief things about the other places I have mentioned. Although from Carmarthen you can go to Tenby by main road a more rewarding journey is to follow the coastline as closely as you can, this means turning off the main road and heading into St Clears as your first point of call. Here you will soon find a local craft outlet that will be selling locally produced artwork and crafts of the region. This promises to be an excellent place to visit and to purchase a quality reminder of your holiday in South Wales. The town itself is split into two halves with the shops being separate from the main residential area. Passing through St Clears you head down the coast to Laugharne, here you find a derelict castle which is well worth a visit if only for the stunning views of the estuary available from the castle walls. Close by you will find several eating establishments such as tea rooms and the local fish and chip shop. Two pubs also reside on the town square for those of you that prefer a more refreshing break. There is a gift shop right on the square that offers an array of gifts but this tends to be more of the standard type of holiday gift than locally produced crafts. Just up the hill from the castle you will find a silversmiths and if open his work is well worth a look, being reasonable priced compared to shops in London etc. Leaving Laugharne you head west past a few small villages before reaching Pendine. Here you find a small resort not on the scale of Tenby but perfect for those that appreciate a beach holiday. Those of you that just want sand and little else will find Pendine the place to be. The beach is excellent and very varied. The main part is very long and when the Ministry of Defence part of the beach is open enables you
                  to walk to Laugharne. Approximately ten miles so for dog owners or people who like to ramble it certainly helps you to walk off your dinner. The other side of the beach for me though is the place to be, here rock pools abound and your children can spend hours catching fish, crabs, prawns and other marine life. Again if the tide is right you can walk round the headland and reach two other beaches with vast expanses of sand and hardly anybody one them. This Good Friday I walked from Pendine to a place called Marros and after leaving Pendine beach I saw a total of ten other people due to the fact it is hard to get to. However if you make the trip either by beach or overland you are rewarded with vast beaches with a variety of marine activity and a petrified forest to keep yourself amused. Or if you prefer sunbathe to your hearts content. Pendine itself offers two pubs several fish bars and cafes along with a small amusement arcade for those of you that need flashing lights to ensure a good holiday. After Pendine we head further west passing through Amroth a long straight road with house and a few shops on the rightside of the road and the sea to the left. again here you get a fair beach but if the tide is in it is far rocky than Pendine so is not as much fun for small children. Saundersfoot is next and here you find the town set behind the harbour that dominates the town itself. A reasonable size beach that can get very crowded on hot days but here you get more in the way of a typical seaside resort. amusement arcades take-aways etc abound and those shops that sell the sort of merchandise that looks so good while you are away but when you get home you consign to the bin straight away. Saundersfoot also has many eating establishments and without doubt the finest one has to be the ‘Royal Oak’ public house. Here you find an extensive fish menu and the presentation is very good indeed. The next stop is Tenby, this is a seaside town it
                  only really come to life from April onwards when you find all the shops opening up again. |During the winter it is a sleepy place and a joy to walk around, however during the summer months parking becomes a major problem and it is best to leave your car at your guest house and commute on foot. Parking by the sea front is very rare and not worth the effort you would have to put into it. The town offers a myriad of gift shops and has several that are well worth looking round, especially if you are looking for something a little bit different. There is a Smiths and a small Woolworths so for those of you that cannot do without them they are both in town however you will not find a department store or indeed a Marks & Spencers. Several of the shops in Tenby are Pound shops were everything costs a pound or of a similar type. You will find every choice of restaurant you could want in Tenby but unfortunately for those of you who have kids with a MacDonalds fetish you will not find one her indeed from Carmarthen the next MacDonalds is on the outskirts of Pembroke. Although the choice is varied I have yet to find a standout restaurant or Public house in Tenby, you get a basic fare and kids are well catered for with a wide choice of meals aimed at them. However if you are expecting gourmet food then Tenby is not the place to be. The beaches are what makes Tenby special for the holiday maker with children. Miles of golden sands on two sides of the bay, the south beach being the longest and when the tide is out the best for families to relax and unwind. The North beach has the harbour and is smaller than its sister but for me the way the tide comes in for me makes it by far the best beach to be on. There are many rocks that children can climb on while the tide comes in around them but the water remains shallow and safe for them to wade through. You also get the joy of seeing the harbour slowly fill with water till all the boats are floating merrily
                  away. For walkers there is a good walk round the town which enables you to take in all the sights without too much effort. With ease even a wheel chair can make it around the sea walk and the views from the promenade are very good especially at sunset with a high tide. All in all Tenby offers a good holiday for people with children and for the elder elements of society, I would not recommend it for those of you looking for wild nightlife it just does not happen in Tenby. Or at least not very often unless you count the bingo. No the joy of Tenby is it’s beaches and the fact that just beyond it is some of the most beautiful countryside in the United Kingdom. Tenby makes a good holiday centre for those that just wish to chill on the beach or for those of you that wish to be more adventurous. Close by is a vineyard that you can walk around before sampling the local produce, also several places offer pony trekking and close by is a theme park called Oakwood. Here you will find the largest wooden roller coaster in the country along with many other rides. Also close by on a Sunday you will find a large car boot were people come from miles around to sell and buy. So all in all I would recommend Tenby for those wishing to experience the beauties of South Wales and for those of you with small children. Cata®

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                    04.02.2002 17:02
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                    Tenby is one of those places that for years I only heard about, and alot of the stuff I heard really wasn't that great. However, maybe the place had changed by the time I got round to going there, but I loved it! Tenby is situated in Pembrokeshire on the West Coast of Wales, near to Saundersfoot, and a stones throw away from Oakwood theme park. Pembrokeshire is one of few areas which I would not reccommend going to without the use of the car. This is because, if you escape form the towns and the usual popular tourist areas, there is alot more to the place that meets the eye. Tenby itself is a lovely little coastal town, with a couple of gorgeaous golden beaches, which always seem to be relatively clean despite being so close to the oil refinery at Milford Haven. The town itself is not somewhere I would recommend to go shopping for the day, although it has alot of nice little souvenir shops aswell as your usual sea side tack. There is also a woolworths and a few other mainstream shops if you need them. There are loads of lovely places to eat, but whats's better than sitting on the sea front eating chips?! If you go to Tenby, the one thing I would recommend is taking the boat trip over to Caldy island. Its only a short trip, and costs a couple of pounds but it is well worth it. Caldey is a little island just off the coast of tenby, where there is a working monastry. Anyone can go over to the island, but I'm afraid the tour of the monastry is for men only. It's still worth visiting the island though- it's definately one of the few remaining unspoilt areas of Britain. No cars drive about the island, only the odd farmer in his tractor, and the tractor that takes you on a tour of the island. This is very cheap and useful if you're not up to walking, but personally I find there is more freedom in walking around the island. There are a few souvenir shops of things made by the monks, and then as you go further a
                    way from the area where the boat docks, you seem to get further from civilisation. Take a walk to the far coast of the island, not many people go that far, and it's really quiet and peaceful. On the way back, call in to the old church, which is again, strangely peaceful. It is supposed to be one of the oldest churches still standing, and they are desperately trying to raise the money to restore it, hence the collection box on the way in. Another, slightly more adventurous way to pass the time in Tenby is to hire one of their little speed boats. They are like a cross between a jet bike and a rib, and two people can get on them. The speeds you get up to are unreal, so take care! This costs twenty pounds for half an hour, which is cheap but well worth it, especially if you are a thrill seeker! Of course, you may prefer to spend your time just relaxing on the beach. If this is the case though, don't just stick to Tenby, explore the area a bit. You can walk through a system of tunnels linking Tenby with Saundersfoot. Although this may seem like a waste of the sunshine, it can be quite an adventure, and Saundersfoot is definately worth exploring aswell, although in many ways it is very similar to Tenby. There are many other areas worth visiting in Pembrokeshire while you are there, so don't just get stuck in the one place. In the rain, I would advise heading for either Tenby leisure pool, or the town of Haverfordwest. This is a slightly better shopping centre than Tenby, although it is qutie limited, you will still find most high-street shops. If you are over in that direction, you could try the Kart Track which is just a short drive away, and indoors, so ideal in bad weather. Closer to Tenby, right next to Oakwood infact, is the crystal maze and bowling alley. You go round the crystal maze as a team, I would advise atleast three to a team. Kids will absolutely love this, but it can get very busy in the summer, especially if it is
                    raining! There are also many beaches in pembrokeshire that shouldn't be missed, such as Newgale, Broadhaven and Littlehaven. St Davids, the smallest city in Britain, is also worth a look around. From here, you can go on a trip on a rib (an inflatable speed boat), to see seals, dolphins and various sea birds. This costs around twenty pounds per person, and different trips are run by different companies, so look around to find the one that suits you. As far as accommodation goes, all of the seaside towns have sea front hotels, and there are also various campsites about. It is also worth looking into holiday cottages, which you will get details of from tourist information offices. So, all in all, tenby is a great holiday destination, but don't just stick around there, be adventurous, Pembrokeshire is a lovely county to explore!

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                      17.06.2001 21:18
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                      Tenby in Pembrokeshire is a bustling holiday town, plenty of shops for those who need a bit of retail therapy, plenty of pubs and eating places at prices to suit every pocket. As a bonus, Tenby is a seriously scenic resort, with Blue Flag beaches, lots and lots of sand, and boat trips to Caldey Island or just around the bays nearby. Also within easy reach of Tenby is Folly Farm, a nice place for the children which apart from the animals has fairground type rides and activities. At Tenby most of the shops, pubs and eateries are situated inside the old walled town, there are the usual touristy gift shops, but there are also the shops which I would class as “different” such as clothing shops which are stocked with unusual and good quality designs, there is a leather shop which has a really good selection of bags, purses, belts and oddments, with prices I consider reasonable and in some cases very competitive. You might want to be decadent and treat yourself to an ice cream in the Italian Ice Cream Parlour, run by Fecci’s who also run a really good Fish & Chip shop in the town! The town often host’s festivals throughout the summer, music festivals, food festivals, and cultural festivals, often with street entertainment provided, the atmosphere is good and very enjoyable. First things first though, car parking is top of the list as it is unlikely you will find a free spot in the town during the peak holiday season. If you follow the one way system and drive along the cliff top road you will find a car park there, quite a large one which charges £2 per day. Good value if you plan to spend the most part of the day either in town or at the beach. Beware if you are not too good on your legs because to access the beach from this car park and indeed most of the others you have to go downhill quite steeply, not so bad until you need to get back up when you have quite a climb ahead of you. Another car park for a sh
                      orter visit is the Multi Storey car park, two hours on the short stay will cost 35 pence, or you can opt for the long stay at £1.65 for 3 hours plus. The Multi Storey is next to Sommerfield supermarket; if you plan to grocery shop there you can claim some of your parking fees back provided you spend £15. There are a few places where you can park in the side streets just outside the main shopping area, again though; you need to be prepared for a walk to the town which is usually uphill! Children will love the play park next to the cliff top car park, and the bouncy castle and trampolines situated on the beach below. Parents will need to be watchful of boisterous children who have an urge to climb walls, as some of the walls have pretty sharp drops on the other side. It is easy to get complacent when in holiday mode, and drop your guard, don’t get me wrong, Tenby is great for children, the beaches especially are clean and spacious, just watch the little darlings when walking near the cliff top walls. Food in local pubs is very good and priced reasonably; there are a couple of pricey eateries but most do meals starting at around the £4 -£5 mark. Down in the harbour you can purchase tickets for sea cruises or perhaps a trip across to Caldey Island. Caldey Island is very peaceful, with a tiny population, and a Monastery, which is the home to Cistercian Monks who have seemingly always had a place there. There is the old priory church, and inside you can see the Caldey Stone, thought to date from the sixth century. Part of the Priory Church is blocked off, for safety reasons, but well worth a visit, as it is so old. Unfortunately women are not allowed into the Monastery, but the men can go and look around. The Monks on Caldey make perfume, chocolate and other items which you can buy from the small shop, there is a post office, a café with seats outside, public toilets, a woodland walk, a lighthouse (steep path to c
                      limb) and St David’s church. It is a special place and it would be a shame to miss it whilst in the Tenby area. You can also take a trailer ride from the landing jetty to the middle of the island for a return fare of £1, a small price to save your weary legs the walk, although it is not very far. The trailer trip includes a little commentary about Caldey Island. I can recommend Tenby to anyone who wants a bit of everything from his or her holiday.

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