Welcome! Log in or Register

Tintagel in General

  • image
10 Reviews

Situated on the north Atlantic coast of Cornwall, the village of Tintagel (pronounced /tɪn'tædʒl̩/ with the stress on the second syllable; Cornish: Dintagell) and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. The village has, in recent times, become a magnet for tourists and day-trippers.

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    10 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      12.03.2010 12:07
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Need to see it to believe it.

      Tintagel is found on the North coast of Cornwall and if famous for its association with King Arthur and the Knights of the round table. It is reasonably easy to get to by car or public transport, I won't bore you with extensive details but traveline.org.uk is a great website for journey planning.

      If you travel by car there are 8 car parks in and around the village, which when you're first arriving is quite amusing as each has a sign saying or something similar "Close to Castle only X meters away", in decreasing increments until you reach this one "Closest to Castle". It is worth noting that the closer the carpark the more expensive the parking was!

      The village its self was quaint but heaving with people and I can imagine it being like this all year round as I visited in chilly February! There are numerous shops, hotels, eateries all which seems to be themed on the King Arthur Legend all have names like 'Ye Olde Sweetshop" and every shop seems to sell a huge variety of plastic swords and wooden shields.

      Some noteworthy places:

      King Arthur's Great Hall - A building which built in the 1930's now houses lots of round tables and granite thrones. The most interesting thing here for me were all the stained glass windows, which were actually designed by a pupil of William Morris , showing various scenes from the Arthur legend. It was £3 entry for an adult.

      The Old Post Office - A National Trust property, built in the mid 14th century and in the late 1900's a room was let to the Post Office for letter sorting. There are some interesting things to see here like one of the first ever post boxes, a collection of needle work dating back to the 17th century and the building itself has its own persona. It doesn't take long to look around here but is worth a visit if you are a National Trust member as it is free (or a few pounds if you are not £2.50 i think)

      Tintagel Castle - An English Heritage site. Probably the most interesting thing in Tintagel. The 'castle' compromises mainly of walks around the grounds which have spectacular views. All that is left of the Castle is ruins and it is honestly hard to understand why any one would build a castle where they did as it is precariously hung over the ocean bellow! It was first build in AD1140 by Earl Richard of Cornwall, the youngest son of King John and historians believe this was to associate himself with the valour surrounding the Arthurian legends (there is a very interesting film shown just as you enter the castle ground explaining all this). The scenery is spectacular but any one with vertigo would probably hate the views as most of them involve jaw dropping heights above the sea! Also for any one with mobility difficulties would find the site difficult to manage as there are a lot of steep steps involved. Keep children and any dogs under close supervision as there are some very steep drops! There is also a small cafe and toilets on site.

      Tintagel was a nice day trip visit and you could easily spend a long afternoon here. The scenery is some of the best I have ever seen and still inspires me when ever I think of it. I would highly recommend the Castle it has that magical feel that you rarely find, no wonder it inspired such noble legends, it is not a place one can forget quickly. :)

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        17.09.2009 15:37
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Still as beautiful as I remember it from my childhood

        I had great memories of visiting Tintagel with my parents when I was a child, and when we holidayed in Devon recently I wanted to revisit it, despite it being in the next county (Cornwall)

        We drove (well, my missus did) into Tintagel via Boscastle and she didn't thank me for taking her round a hairpin at the bottom of a fairly steep hill! ;)

        Anyway, we pulled into Tintagel and spotted a car park with a visitor/tourist information centre so we pulled in and paid £5 for a day's parking. When we walked through the village though we spotted that we could have parked for less than half that price.

        The visitor centre appeared to be very interesting if you are interested in the history and legend of Tintagel and it's castle with lots of free information as well as guide books for sale.

        Personally, for me though, I wasn't interested in the history, I just love the village and the amazing views and walks in the area. There are many gift shops in the village selling Arthurian tat and other tourist souvenirs. There was one shop there selling locally made pottery that I wanted to shop at, but it was closed on the day we visited.

        So, onto the castle...we walked through the village and down a very steep path towards the castle with several English Heritage information signs on the way. None of these signs though declared that you have to pay to get access to the hill/island that the ruins are on.

        When I visited as a child there was no charge, but I guess fair's fair, someone has to pay for the upkeep/cleaning/safety of the area, so I can't complain there. However, I did object to being expected to pay again for a guide book to tell you what you are looking at in the ruins, there is very little information provided up there.

        A word of warning, if you have mobility issues you will have extreme difficulty climbing the steps to the ruins and there is no wheelchair access. I am fairly fit, however, I also have a strong fear of heights and I had forgotton how steep and how high some parts were. It was also fairly windy on the day we went which didn't help.

        We have a 2 and a half year old son who went with us, he loved it, but another word of warning...it's not easy getting a toddler up the tight, steep steps and you do have to keep hold of them at ALL times, there are some very steep, unprotected drops around the ruins.

        However, despite the bad stuff (mostly due to my fear of heights) it is well worth the effort and cost to get up there and take in the views, they really are amazing and you can see for miles!

        On the return trip my missus decided she didn't want to climb back up the path to the village so she took our toddler in the land rover, it cost £1.50 for adults and 75p for kids each way. I was stubborn and called her names and I started climbing....but boy, it didn't seem that steep walking downwards! That climb nearly killed me and I headed straight to the nearest pub at the top for a well earned rest and a pint!

        Besides the village and castle there are also miles of coastal/cliff paths to explore that do not cost anything and offer equally impressive views.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        28.05.2009 21:55
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        5 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        You will love it

        This was one of my favourite days out when we holidayed in Cornwall last year. It's a really magical place with lots to see and do and I highly recommend a visit there.

        Tintagel is situated on the North Coast of Cornwall. It's set in a really beautiful spot amongst Cornwall's finest beaches and bays. On the way to Tintagel itself we passed by the nearby Port Isaac and decided to stop off there for a walk as we thought it looked very pretty. If you have time do try and stop here on your way to Tintagel - its a glorious little town. There is a picturesque fishing village as well as a pretty beach and some fantastic clifftop walks to be done. I didn't realise it at the time but found out afterwards that the TV series Doc Martin was set there!

        After driving from Port Isaac we entered the village of Tintagel. There are several carparks with plenty of parking spaces and they are very reasonably priced - it cost £2 (I think, well it was either £1 or £2!) for the whole day so this works out really well and means you can stay as long as you want.

        We thought we'd investigate Tintagel Castle first while we still had plenty of energy (it's very steep)! The castle at Tintagel is famously associated with King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table and is full of history and mythical tales. We first walked the 10-15 minutes from the car park to the St Materiana's Church which is set on the top of the cliffs. It is a very old building and dates back to around 1100. It's definately worth a look and good to take a few pictures of. You can then follow the coastal path which leads to the castle. It is a fantastic walk and theres lots of rugged and dramatic coastline to be seen. We sat and just took in the views for about 15 minutes - it really is beautiful.

        You can then get to the castle but it is a steep walk with lots and lots of steps! Wear comfy shoes otherwise you might not make it to the gateway! Once you've walked the steps and entered the main castle area you come to the paying area. Although owned by it Duchy of Cornwall it is operated by English Heritage and they charge £4.90 per adult for entry. The people that take your money are very friendly and let you know they are around it need anything. We had our dog with us and were worried they would suddenly say we couldn't walk around with him but you are free to take dogs around with you.

        Once you've paid you are in the inner walls of the castle and can wander round and have a look at the remains. The castle is in ruins now and much of it has fallen into the sea but still has an awe-inspiring atmosphere and you can feel that it is a place of mythical legends. This is added to by the fantastic coastline and the turquoise/green waters below. It gets quite a lot of tourists here but it's pretty big and only really feels busy when you are climbing the steps as they are quite narrow so you have to sometimes squash past people.

        Once you've had a look at the castle you can go down some steps and see Castle Beach which is a lovely little cove at the bottom of the castle. If it's a low tide you can access Merlin's Cave which is worth a look. We spent about half an hour just chilling out on the beach as it's nice and sheltered although it does get fairly busy down there. Also in the Castle Beach area is a cafe where you can get drinks and ice creams and some toilets which were very clean.

        When you are done at the castle then you have to head back to the village up a very steep hill. However, there is the option to get a lift up the hill in a jeep. This costs a small fee but is worth it if you are tired/have mobility problems/have small children. We braved it and walked and it's a toughie!

        When we got back to the town we had a wander round and checked out the shops. It's quite a small town but is picturesque and quaint and has a lovely atmosphere. There are lots of gift shops that sell King Arthur themed gifts as well other general Cornwall souvenirs plus lots of books. Everything seemed reasonably priced and everybody that worked in the shops was friendly and welcoming.

        If you get hungry make sure you go to the pasty shop to get a traditional cornish pasty. I got a lamb and mint one and my boyfriend got a vegetable one. They are truly divine, you must try one if you go to Tintagel. They are massive and full of flavour. Yum! There are also other places to eat in the town if you don't fancy a pasty - little pubs and restaurants and there is also a Spar type shop. Plus ice cream places to get traditional cornish ice cream.

        The other thing to check out in Tintagel is the old post office. It is a delightful medieval building that is over 600 years old. Inside, one room is furnished to how how it would have looked when it was a post office in the 19th century and the rest are furnished with local oak furniture in a 19th century style. Outside is a lovely little peaceful courtyard garden. The post office is quite small and can get quite busy as can the rest of Tintagel. The streets of the village are quite small and narrow but it is a fantastic place and I'm not surprised it's popular. You just have to be considerate and sometimes step back to let people pass.

        Overall we had a wonderful and memorable day in Tintagel. It should be on the to-do list of everybody that goes to Cornwall. It's full of history and fascinating legends as well as great shops, fabulous views and delicious food. There is something there for all the family.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          23.08.2008 10:30
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          7 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          great day out

          While visiting Cornwall this year, we ventured out to Tintagel, round lots of windy roads, well that's the way my sat nav took me. Tintagel is a small Cornish village it is situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall.

          Car park has a pay meter we paid around £2.70 for 4 hours. There was a choice of prices depending how long you wished to stay. There is a Castle Information Centre with an Exhibition and Shop and a café just across from it were we had a nice pot of local tea.

          There is a walk along the coast path from Tintagel to Boscastle.I never did this but there seemed to be plenty of people walking it.

          The high street in Tintagel has a few gift shops and places to eat. The old post office is 600 years old and is a national heritage property. The post office is a traditional Cornish long house and has a cottage garden. There is an entry fee for the post office.

          We visited a bakery and they made the most wonderful Cornish pasties and scones. The pasties were enormous. I got traditional and my husband tried the cheese and onion but they did a vegetarian one as well and a lamb and mint. They were very tasty but I could not finish mine, it was far too big. Nothing like what you get in Gregg's truly a real Cornish pasty.

          The headland is very picturesque. The sea was a wonderful turquoise in colour,looking out to the Atlantic Ocean the scenery is spectacular. The headlandof Tintagel is more or less an island and is just connected by a small piece of land. You have to Cross a wooden bridge to the island.

          Tintagel is the mythical home of King Arthur. Legend says he was born there by queen Igraine of cornwall.
          Tintagel castle was built in 13th century and was built by Richard the earl of Cornwall. Below the castle on the Castle Beach is Merlin's cave which you can only get down to at low tide. the legend says that Merlin still walks there and his voice can be heard.

          Tintagel castle is an English heritage site. Prices for entry to Tintagel castle for an adult was £4.50. Tintagel castle is just ruins, it is quite a climb as well, up lots of wooden steps these steps go around the cliffs, and it was very windy when we went up. I was out of breath when I got up to the top. There are two separate sets of steps in the castle ruins both of them being very steep.

          From the top of the castle the sea pounds the rocks around you; it is easy to sea why there has been lots of erosion around the castle.

          You really need to wear sensible shoes or walking boots, as the walk to the castle ruins is quite a climb.

          Other places to visit around Tintagel are st Materiana's church which was built between 1080 and 1150.

          A very enjoyable visit.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            15.07.2008 23:04

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            great to go to if you're in the area but don't make a special journey

            Tintagel is situated at the very northerly end of the north cornish coast and to be honest if you're staying at the vey souwthwest corner, its one hell of a drive to get here!.

            Its a very small picturesque little place all centred aroun d the legend of King Arther and the 'remains' of his castle can be see and visited if you have the courage to go up there!

            Every shop you go by sells King Arthur and Arthurian legend merchandise, they have really jumped on the bandwagon here!

            There isn't a lot here or in the area, a very small little beach and the usual cafe's and souvenir shops and as picturesque as this place is, I wouldn't venture up all this way just to visit Tintagel as it's not the place that you can spend hours in.

            Having said that, there are some fabuolous views over the dramatic coastline and some great walks along the cliffs

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            04.07.2006 21:30
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            2 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Wonderful scenery, lots of things to do, and in a beautiful corner of Cornwall!

            I have visited Tintagel many times over the past 10 years, and would first start by saying that it is seen at it's best in either late spring (May/June) or early autumn (Spetember/October). This is not only to avoid the height of the tourist season, but also because these times of year are perfect for taking long walks along the coastal path, exploring the cliffs and Tintagel castle, an impressive castle even in ruin; however not for the very unfit or faint hearted - more than once I have felt as though I would be blown over the edge on a windy day!
            The actual town of Tintagel is a friendly place, with plenty of good bakeries and pubs and restaurants.
            It is however, VERY much orientated around the legend of King Arthur that is associated with the castle (which was incidently built 600 or so years after Arthur was sposed to be around - but perhaps there was castle there before too? Perhaps...).
            The Old Post Office is also worth a visit, with an interesting look into the past and lots of 17th century furnishings and tapestries, but it's best to note you may find yourself negotiating some pretty tricky manouveres on the stairs on busy days!
            The King Arthur Halls is interesting, with a show complete with lasers to tell the story of King Arthur... just go see it if you want to see what I mean... You can even join the fellowship for a fee!
            As well as offering it's own share of entertainment, Tintagel is close to (in walking distance if you've got your walking shoes on) the villages of Boscastle and Port Isaac, among others.
            I have another review on Boscastle already, and Port Isaac is also worth a mention, due to the amazing seafood (fresh from the port itself) served in almost every restaurant (The slipway in particular) as well as a small aquarium, the fudge shop, and beautiful views.
            The Rocky Valley is also worth a look - you can reach it through a short walk from the road, or a walk from either Boscastle or Tintagel along the south coastal path. The ancient mill and carving is really a very atmospheric and beautiful place to visit.
            This really is an area of England worth discovering and exploring. I have travelled to 16 other countries around the world, and this is still my faveourite place to visit.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              25.01.2006 13:44
              2 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              A beautiful village with history and beautifulviews.

              Tintagel is a beautiful Cornish village . With all its history relating to King Arthur and the Tintagel castle there is plenty to see and do.
              King Arthur was said to be born on Tintagel Island where the remains of the 13th-century castle stand today. There is a shuttle bus that will take you down to the castle from the town centre or you can walk it – its not that far and its beautiful. Once at the Castle you can either pay to look around or simply walk along the cliffs and take in the beauty. Below the castle is Merlins cave which is accessible at low tide and loads of fun to explore – the kids will love it.
              Within the village itself the streets are paved with lovely pubs and cafes and numerous shops relating to king Arthur, witch craft and other tourist related shops.
              There is also the Old Post Office, which is owned by the National Trust, King Arthur’s Great Halls which house some magnificent stained glass windows, a rock and fossil museum and a toy museum.
              Tintagel does have a visitor centre so if your stuck on what to do first pop in there and they will be able to help you and inform you about the area.
              To get there head towards Wadebridge on the A39 and it should be signposted. Or you can get there from Camelford on the A39.
              A good family day out.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                14.02.2001 18:48
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                3 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                I know Cornwall, especially around the Tintagel area, very well. Tintagel for those who are not up to speed is connected with the legends of King Arthur and for me the place holds a certain mystique. There are plenty of Bed & Breakfasts, hotels, caravan sites and self-catering places in town and on the outskirts. There are also a selection of shops - some selling the usual tatt - but places like Dragons Breath are well worth a visit. There plenty of surfing outlets too local to Tintagel! The King Arthur pub opposite has a bar called The Excalli-Bar - which is tackiness all over!!! If you are ok with caravans then at the end of the high street there is the Atlantic Caravan Park which has static caravans of ample size - including shower, two bed rooms and a huge lounge area - 1 minutes walk from town and all amenities. There was (at the last visit) still no cash point. The nearest cash point is in Camelford, Natwest and Barclays - possibly a Link one as well. Camelford is about 2 or 3 miles away. During the first weekend in August there is a mock Arthurian battle on the near by fields for all folks to see and enjoy. Great fun and you meet plenty of interesting people and it is cheap to go in. The best bits for me, having spent a lot of time there, is the castle and the cove. The journey to and from the cove and castle can be made via Land Rover for a small fee as the walk to and from the cove is quite steep. The cove has a huge cave which runs beneath the castle. At very low tide you can walk right through. The cave is supposedly haunted by a woman. Her ring is rumoured to be hidden in the cave and will one day be found! The beaches are accessible locally by foot and are not suitable for wheel chair users which is a shame. However - further along the coast there are beaches that are fully accessible. Not far away there is Padstow, Camelford and Bude. Rough Tor can be climbed which is an ancient sacrificial
                hill and The Stanions Stone Circle is also accessible. Try lying in the centre of the circle on a hot summers day with only larks for company :) For me - Tintagel is everything that Glastonbury wasn't. On my first visit I didn't like the place and if it has that effect on then think on...I have been back many times and have made many friends there. Each time I return it feels in some respects like I am coming home. Try it and find out for yourself - go just out of season when the tourists have gone - it will allow a much more peaceful and enjoyable experience... :)

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  11.02.2001 02:22
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  1 Comment

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  Tintagel one of the most beautiful places on earth, if all us ruddy tourists didn't go there! I would like to recommend some of my favourite places in case anyone feels the urge to spend some time there. 1) The Cornishman Inn. OK so the first one is a pub, but that’s always a necessity on holiday and this is a lovely pub with great food, friendly staff, pool tables (always necessary after a couple of shandys) and popular with locals and tourists. We have visited many pubs in the area and always returned to this as it’s one of those places where you feel at home. 2) Tintagel Castle. Obvious really but it really is beautiful even when you discount the Arthurian legend that surrounds it, which is most unlikely. English Heritage' describes it as 'one of the grandest and most spectacular sites looked after by English Heritage'. I say 'wear your walking shoes' 4 inch heels are not ideal as I discovered, but It really is lovely place to visit. 3)Rocky Valley. We once stopped in an old house in rocky valley next to the mill (some American visitors asked us if it was the toilet!) and the whole area is quite spectacular. Once past the mill you can walk through a steep valley taking you along the route of a river flowing out to the sea. Bronze Age carvings are included free of charge along the way (myself, not particularly interested, boyfriend, very exited lots of pictures) A nice walk to the headland and back for obligatory tea and scones at the mill. 4) Trevillet Mill (see above). Once the site of a trout farm (how do you get your tractor round them?) thankfully now gone, the mill is an attraction, coffee shop, place to stay and has a multitude of animals wandering round outside - don't go if your scared of goats! Tintagel is a great place to stay if a little swamped by tourists and 'Arthurian happy' EVERTHING is named after King Arthur e.g. King Art
                  hur’s Arcade, King Arthur’s breakfast (at one pub). And within easy travelling distance is Boscastle, a small harbour village with the witchcraft museum and a strange pub called the cobweb, nice food, nice atmosphere, scary cobweb and a Christian shop that sells fossils (can anyone explain that?). So if you’re going to Cornwall don't forget the little Arthurian mad village of Tintagel.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    16.01.2001 18:38
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Tintagel is a town on the north coast of Cornwall, not far from the border with Devon. The main street is full of gift shops selling everything from Cornish Piskies to Arthurian memorabilia. There are also one or two excellent new age shops, Dragon’s Breath opposite the main car park is probably the best, selling crystals, tarot cards, incense sticks etc. At the top of the main street there is King Arthur’s Hall where the pictures on the Victorian stained glass windows tell his story and the gift shop sells everything Arthurian! There are many cafes and restaurants, many of which sell the traditional Cornish pasties, a treat not to be missed while you’re here. Along this street you will also see the famous old Tintagel Post Office now a room used mainly for craft fayres. A steep climb will take you down to the ruins of Tintagel Castle, which is the legendary seat of King Arthur. It is actually the ruins of the castle built for the Earl of Cornwall in 1145, and of a Celtic monastery. There are lots of steps to climb if you intend to visit the ruins and they are hewn into the rock in many places. This means that they are varying widths and depths and may slope in any direction so wear sensible shoes and take care. There is a café at the bottom of the cliff near to the castle entrance where you can get tea and coffee and light snacks. You can also climb down onto the beach from here and walk into Merlin’s Cave (when the tide is out). The atmosphere here is ethereal and it is easy to imagine that Merlin may walk out of the shadows to greet you. Legend has it that Merlin's ring still remains in this cave just waiting to be found..... When you're ready to head back up to the main street, you can either walk if you're feeling fit or catch the Land Rover which gives rides to and from the castle to the top of the town for a nominal fee.
                    There is also a walk from Tintagel to St Nectan’s Glen with it beautiful waterfall and tea-room.

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments