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      29.07.2010 23:05
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      Historic, interesting and full of character

      Getting to Worcester Worcester is situated close to junctions 6 and 7 of the M5 motorway. It has two rail stations - Foregate St in the city centre and Shrub Hill which is about 10 minutes walk away. Worcester also has a bus station in the city centre but this is not very well served by National Express (which I believe call at Warndon coachway on the edge of the city). Accommodation As a Worcester resident I am not in a position to comment on the city's hotels and guest houses but there are plenty around. If you are coming by train and want to be close to the city centre try the Whitehouse hotel which is a stone's throw from Foregate St station and has its own leisure club with a pool and gym. I have heard good reports about Dilmore House B&B in Fernhill Heath just outside the city. Shopping Plenty of it for such a small city! There are other reviews on this site about the shops in Worcester so I won't go into detail here. Entertainment Worcester has two cinemas and a music venue (Huntingdon Hall) which are centrally located as well as the Swan Theatre which is slightly outside the city centre near the race course and hosts a variety of performances. Nightlife I've never really been into clubbing so am not an ideal person to comment but my party animal friends seem to enjoy themselves. Restaurants Worcester and the surrounding areas have no shortage of pub restaurants which serve decent food. There are a number of '2 for 1' restaurants around which are not very good value if you're on your own but reasonably priced for couples. The Tything (just to the north of the city centre on the A38) has no shortage of curry houses with my particular favourite being the Anarkali. The Angel chef near the bus station and housed in the former fruit and veg market is a buffet style Chinese restaurant. I'm not a particular fan of Chinese food but can always find something there that takes my fancy. Then there's McDonalds, Subway, Pizza Hut and KFC (out of town) etc that you'd find in most cities Things to do Whilst there is plenty to see and do within the city boundary I would advise venturing further afield if time permits. If the weather is good then the Malvern hills are highly recommended to anyone who likes scenery and/or walking. See separate reviews on them. The hills are very distinctive and you cannot help but notice them when travelling around the area. Gentler walks may be had along the banks of the river Severn in Worcester or the Avon which flows through nearby Evesham and Pershore. Take a camera as there are some great views and if walking along the eastern bank of the Severn near Worcester cathedral look out for the watergate with its records of various floods through the centuries. Both rivers often flood during the winter months which makes strolling alongside them difficult but can be quite spectacular. There is also the Worcester to Birmingham canal along which you can walk - it doesn't flood like the rivers but parts of it are often drained in the winter. Worcester cathedral (recently removed from the £20 note) is worth taking a look at. During the summer it is sometimes possible to ascend the tower and see for miles. The Severn Valley railway also makes for a great day out. It can be reached by catching a train to Kidderminster and a combined ticket is available. Other nearby towns such as Evesham, Pershore and Ledbury are well worth visiting but check when and if markets are being held there. And finally if you want to see somewhere bigger then Birmingham is only an hour away by train! Sport The city is home to Worcestershire County Cricket Club (New Rd) and Pitchcroft racecourse both situated close to the river Severn and doubling as jet ski lakes from time to time. Worcester Warriors Rugby Club is situated close to junction 6 of the M5. We also have a non league football club and it's probably not the best place to come to if you wish to watch this sport. Getting around There is public transport but some parts of the area can be reached more easily than others. If you are going to be staying in accommodation that is not centrally located and plan to use the bus it might be worth checking their frequency beforehand. They are relatively expensive compared to other areas of the country. Worcester is relatively flat and parts of the city and surrounding areas are well served by cycle ways. Evesham, Ledbury, Great Malvern and parts of the Malvern hills can be reached by train as can the Severn Valley railway.

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        10.08.2005 18:07
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        A wonderful english getaway.

        I have posted this review here because I can't find anywhere else to put Malvern and it deserves to be put somewhere being one of my favourite getaways. Worcester is the town nearest to Malvern, being some 12 miles away and the hills and Malvern Town itself are easily accessible from Worcester by both road ( about 15 minutes) or direct train link ( about 8 minutes). If you’re looking for somewhere to go in the holidays this summer you could do a lot worse than hit the sights of Malvern. Malvern is an old Victorian spa town nestling in. Yes the Malvern Hills. In days gone by people would visit the town from near and far to partake of its mysterious waters, which were claimed to clear all manner of ills. Having visited the local Water Museum I think the miraculous properties were derived more from time out from a rich lifestyle than any mystical properties held by the water but what the heck….it made Malvern rich and famous, as it still is today for it’s bottled water. If you are a water connoisseur you can actually collect your own Malvern Spring Water from St. Anne’s Well. It’s a bit of a hike up a hill but the views are great and they provide a café for a recovery stop. Aside from Water, Malvern is best known for it’s hill walks and has a thriving hill walking tourism industry. It is the home of Elgar (famous ancient musician) with local attractions including The Malvern Festival Theatre, (part of the West End circuit so it gets all the London shows) Eastnor Castle and the Three Counties Showground, which houses a host of different agricultural shows throughout the year together with proms and fireworks displays in September and November. A short drive or train trip, as mentioned, takes you to the historic city of Worcester, where you can visit the Cathedral, Worcester Porcelain and the Commandery together with a large pedestrianised range of shops. Talking of shopping, if staying in Malvern there are good train links directly into the Bull Ring in Birmingham. A shoppers paradise! (Approx. £7 return on a saver day ticket) as well as all the other Birmingham attractions such as the Sealife Centre. Take care though, there are two Malvern stations….Great Malvern and Malvern Link. If you want the centre of town you want to make sure you get off at Great Malvern. The town itself boasts a great range of Victorian buildings. It is picturesque and the local conservators have gone to great lengths to try and keep the character of the town. It has all facilities including a leisure centre, complete with gym, wave machine and water flume, a cinema within the Theatre complex and a number of quirky and boutique like shops and cafes. The ‘Scarlet Ark’ in the High Street meets both these criteria. I highly recommend the hot chocolate, with whipped cream and marshmallows of course, together with the chocolate brownies, a personal favourite. The shop next to the café, also called the Scarlet Ark, is home to a number of craft items from local artisans. Oh yes, another thing Malvern is famous for ….pictures of the Malvern Hills! The place is frequented by artists of varying calibres and there are a number of outlets for their works in the town. ACCOMODATION If you choose to stay in the town itself it has a number of options from hotels to B & B. The main hotel, and grandest, is the Abbey. This is an olde worlde type of place, with ivy clinging to it’s walls. It has over 100 rooms and great views. It’s very central to the town, in fact whilst in a quiet location next to the Priory it is only about 2 minutes walk to the town centre. If booking on line shop around for deals though as prices range from £50 - £115 for a standard double. There are a number of smaller hotels such as The Foley Arms. (www.foleyarmshotel.com) Again in a central location but I felt with more of a pub atmosphere than posh hotel of days gone by…. Or should that be described as a relaxed atmosphere. Anyhow, it is a different league to the Abbey but at a cost of £100 for a double it’s not really reflected in the price. There is also a wealth of character B & B properties around at various prices. These represent far more value for money and provide all the comforts of home. EVENING ENTERTAINMENT If you choose to stay in the town you may wonder what there is to do of an evening. As already mentioned the Malvern Festival Theatre is on the West End circuit and get a great array of productions from London either at the end or the start of a tour. Recent attractions have been Blood Brothers and the Rat Pack. Full details of events at the theatre can be found at www.malvern-theatres.co.uk and it is advisable to book in advance although last minute tickets do become available. From an eating point of view Malvern is limited but what it has is of an excellent standard. The Italian restaurant, Benedicto’s in Church Walk (01684 578288), is in the centre of town and highly recommended. Parking is easy, although everything in Malvern can be walked to if staying there, and it is owned and staffed by first generation Italians who have been known to burst into song when overcome with enthusiasm for their work! It also has a wonderful Indian restaurant, the Anupam. A word of warning here though, if you think an Indian meal is a cheap alternative think again and avoid this place. The food is superb but so are the prices and you need to book in advance, particularly at a weekend. There is the usual array of pubs, many being freehouses which stocking a range of beers. One of particular note is the Nags Head in Graham Road. This pub usual stocks at least 7-8 guest beers and has won numerous awards. They have recently refurbished their restaurant which serves home cooked meals of a great quality. You can’t book though so if you want to eat get there early. If you have a car, the pubs in the area are too many to mention. I suggest you get your CAMRA book out! For none beer drinkers like myself, what I particularly like about the pubs round here is most of them have a wine list and sell by the glass….this means that while hubby quaffs that real ale pint you too can have a pleasant and refreshing drink – not the usual offering of Stowells! MORE DETAILS If having read this you would like more details I suggest you visit http://www.malvernhills.gov.uk They have details on all hotels, restaurants and attractions in the area in what they refer to as the Malvern Experience. If you are looking for a get away from it place to go in the Midlands I suggest you look no further. MY OPINION I love the town. As a place to get away and recoup it’s great. Even the children enjoy it for a weekend or two. There are an enormous range of walks, either in the hills or over the common and the surrounding countryside is superb. I would recommend it to anyone. Thank you for reading this and if you go, enjoy.

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          12.07.2002 10:29
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          **22/07/02 UPDATE AT END** ...the Faithful City. A title bestowed by King Charles due to its staunch Royalism in the Civil War (the populace are still generally very pro-royalty), and a title the local Evening News uses half to death... Think of Worcester, and you think of salmon fishing on the cricket pitch. Well, you do if you live there - like many towns along the River Severn (as I know from personal experience) its winter floods can be very severe indeed. But assuming you've managed to visit on a day when the car parks aren't underwater, what can you expect to find? The answer is, a great deal. For such a small city (Worcester's population is only about 100,000), there's a surprising amount of interest packed into its small confines. Worcester's most famous landmark, of course, is its cathedral, and it's every bit as lovely "in the stone" as it appears in photographs. Given Worcester's sometimes turbulent history, it's perhaps surprising that it has survived as well as it has, and for that we must give thanks (which is an appropriate thing to do in a cathedral in any case!). Walking along its beautifully preserved passages, especially on a quiet day out of season with the faint sound of choir practice echoing along the walls, you can easily believe that you are back in mediaeval times. Come through the cloisters, however, and you are back in the modern day as you enter the cafe, which is, to my mind, the best place in Worcester for fat-filled, gooey cakes, something for which I have a particular weakness. If the tower is open, it's well worth going up - the view from the top is quite sensational, and even the most hardened atheist can't deny that there's something rather spiritual about the feeling of elation you get up there. Obviously, Worcester's other major feature is the River Severn, and not just during floods. Thomas Telford's elegant bridge blends perfect ly with its surroundings to create some gorgeous riverside walks - though you will have to beware of the swans, who fear nothing and no-one! In summer, there are usually several companies offering various river trips, floating restaurants etc, and these can be recommended, as being afloat gives you a different perspective on the city from that experienced ashore. (In winter, on the other hand, the trick is finding a part of Worcester that *isn't* in the river...) Shoppers are well catered for in Worcester, with a wide variety of places to spend too much money. At first sight, the shopping area appears to be simply the long, pedestrianised Foregate, but in fact there is another street (The Shambles) parallel to this, two shopping centres (Crowngate and Lychgate), and many side- and back-streets, all of which are worth nosing around. You can spend an entire day in Worcester's shops without even scratching the surface of what is available. Going into a little more detail, then: Russell & Dorrell provide what every provincial town should have, an independent (and excellent) department store - there is also a branch of Beatties, the Midland department store chain, and a Debenhams for the less original shopper; bookworms (like me!) will be delighted with the new Hammick's bookshop, which is much more spacious than the very cramped Waterstone's, though the relatively recent loss of Bookends (a superb remainder/secondhand bookshop) is much to be lamented; and there's plenty of hi-techery - HMV, GAME (formerly Electronics Boutique), a fabulous independent computer shop called Format (which also sells jigsaws) and of course Antics - another independent shop for which many in Worcestershire have a soft spot, as it was there that they bought their first Sinclair computer games. If you're looking for interesting little shops to poke about in, then Worcester can offer them too: the Reindeer Court "shopping centre" (t here are only about a dozen shops in it!) is great for browsers, as you can find all sorts of things, ranging from irons to old records. It's out of the rain, too! Elsewhere, the part of the Crowngate centre built into the old town has some very interesting places to see, including the Britmex co-operative, which sells various handmade goods from indigenous peoples of America. Eating out in Worcester is a pleasant experience. I've already mentioned the Cathedral's cafe, and indeed it seems that many of the best places to eat in the city are not dedicated restaurants. The cafe in Russell & Dorrell is considerably better than most shop cafes, though like most shop cafes it allows smoking (in some of its area), which is very much to be regretted. Harvington Hall, in the Crowngate centre, which is primarily a theatre, also has some quite excellent light meals on sale. For those who do want a more substantial feast, there are the usual collection of cafes and restaurants - thankfully they haven't all turned into those damned coffee bars, though the disease is spreading. And for fast-food junkies, the normal mix of greasy spoons is available (tip: go to Burger King rather than McDonald's, as the latter is packed with screeching kids. The fries are better too). Getting to Worcester is straightforward: the main railway station, Foregate Street, is only a couple of hundred yards from the city centre, and has direct connections to Birmingham and Hereford. Be careful, though - Worcester's other station, Shrub Hill, is a mile or so away, and the hill in between is fairly steep. Bus routes are fairly good too, and the (reasonably clean but rather dingy) bus station is sensibly situated beneath Crowngate shopping centre - expect some crowding in summer, though. For those who insist on driving, there are several multi-storey car parks dotted around, including one above Crowngate itself and a pleasant open-air space by the racecourse at P itchcroft (which is a summer-only racetrack - when you've seen what the river does in the winter, you'll understand why!). Entertainment is reasonable - there's the aforementioned Harvington Hall, the Swan Theatre at Pitchcroft (constantly struggling for funds), two cinemas (an oldish Odeon and a newish Warner Village, both an easy walk from the centre, for once), any number of pubs of all stripes, and the inevitable Tramps nightclub, which for as long as I can remember has been the place where teenagers go for their eighteenths, and for equally as long has been a place to avoid if you want a quiet life. I'm way out of my depth in this area, so a trip to www.night-clubber.com will give you more info on Worcester's places to be seen, groovy guys and chicks (or something). Finally, of course, every three years the Three Choirs Festival is held in Worcester, and this is emphatically not something you want to die without having attended. I love Worcester, and always have. It seems to me to be just the right size - big enough to have all the facilities one could need, yet small enough to walk around comfortably, without great treks across busy streets. The people are generally friendly (beggars included, which is good as there are quite a lot), you get a high class of busker (string quartets, steel bands etc) and the pace of life isn't too quick.If you have some time to spare, you could do a lot worse than come here. ----------------------- ** UPDATE - 22/07.02 ** And it's not a nice one, I'm afraid. The Lychgate area of the city centre (just across the road from the Cathedral) is going to be redeveloped in a few months' time. And that means, among other things, the end of the line for Russell & Dorrell (except for its furniture section, which will continue elsewhere). Mr Dorrell himself made the announcement, and one has to give him credit for having the common decency to agree to a lengthy interview on the local radio station, in which he was most willing to explain the reasoning - in brief, that pressure from Worcester's two chain department stores (Debenhams and Beatties) had made it increasingly difficult for an independent to thrive. So R&D will close in January, after just over 150 years. A very, very sad day for the city, and yet another defeat in the battle against shopping uniformity. Another significant casualty of the redevelopment (unless it can find alternative premises) will be Format, the independent computer games and jigsaw shop, which will also be a sad loss to the place. With Bookends' brief revival as a remainder-only bookshop seemingly at an end too (the "closing sale" signs are already up), things are looking a little bleak for Worcester's much-vaunted variety of outlets. Let's hope that its character can be retained in the longer term.

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            13.02.2002 17:07
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            I have lived in Worcestershire on and off throughout my life, and I'm proud to be able to call it home. I'm going to write about the county of Worcestershire, because if you just stay in Worcester itself then you are missing out on alot. I will divide the information into sections, so that you can pick the bits that interest you if you fancy a visit to the area! 1. Worcester by day 2. Worcester by night 3. Eating and drinking 4. Historical areas of Worcestershire 5. Countryside and walking 6. Music 7. Where to stay 1. Worcester by day Worcester is one of those places where the days just fly by. There's so much to do in the city that you really have to plan carefully, or the day will be gone before you have done everything that you wanted to do. The pedestrianised shopping area is quite large, although easily walkable. It has all the main department stores, aswell as loads of small, friendly shops where you can find a bargain which nobody else will have. It's definately worth exploring the little side streets aswell as the big arcades and department stores. The Cathedral is situated just outside of the pedestrian area, and it is definately worth taking a few minutes out of your shopping trip to have a look around and unwind. Equally, the river is very pretty, and you can walk along the river and feed the huge swan population. If you don't fancy shopping, you could go to one of the two cinemas in town. The Odeon is at the opposite end of town to the cathedral, near to Forgate Street Station. It's not too expensive, and the staff are always quite friendly. However, a recent addition to the town is the new Warner Village cinema which is on the same road as the cathedral. This, being new, is really plush and comfortable. It is more expensive than the Odeon, but it's worth it and they give student discount at all times! Another idea wh ich may appeal is Worcester races. This is supposed to be pretty good, aslong as the racecourse isn't flooded! The last time I saw the racecourse, someone was going over the jumps on a jetski! If you don't fancy the races, I would advise avoiding the town on race days. It becomes really busy, and as the racecourse also acts as a carpark when not otherwise occupied, parking is a nightmare on race day. 2. Worcester by night There are loads of pubs in Worcester, all of which get really packed at the weekend. Shamus O'Donnells has a lovely atmosphere and cheap drinks! The same goes for the Postal Order, where a pound buys you a pint of anything anytime. The postal order is opposite the odeon cinema. If you go there, perhaps you would like to try a local brew from the Wyre Piddle Brewery. For example, you could have a pint of 'piddle in the dark' or 'piddle in the snow'. I kid you not! As far as nightclubs go, take your pick, depending on your age. Tramps is full of teeny boppers, and I mean really teeny boppers! If you are older than 16 you may feel out of place. Thursdays is student night though, and this is slightly better, and cheap atleast! Images is similar to Tramps, as is Torch. Bushwackers is supposed to be good for older clubbers, but my personal favourite is Chicago Rock Café. This is a bar and club. Entry is only a couple of quid, and they do some good drinks offers. The only drawback is that it usually closes at 12.30 am, so get there early! 3. Eating and drinking Well, I think I have pretty much covered drinking already, so I'll move on to food. For lunch, there are alot of nice pubs and cafés dotted about the town. Personally, I would recommend either RSVP (formally peppers), or Little Venice. Little Venice is very cheap on a week day; they offer a starter, pizza and a dessert for just under six pounds. I recommend the chocolate fudge cake! In the eve ning, there are several curry houses, all of a very high standard an you get loads of grub! For a something a little more posh, you could try Valentinos Italian restaurant, which is supposed to be pretty spectacular. If you drive a little way out of Worcester, there is a pub called the Timberdine which is a Harvester. If you get there before 6.30, you get a third off the price of your meal. Service and food here are both of a very high standard. 4. Historical areas of Worcestershire Well, where do I start? Worcester itself has some very historical buildings. A novel way to learn about them is by going on an organised ghost hunt around the town. You learn about history aswell as ghosts! Also, pay a visit to the commandery, even children will find history interesting here. Eastnor Castle is just over the border in Herefordshire, but deserves a mention when it comes to history. It is one of the most beautiful castles I have ever seen and is steeped in history. The Malverns all have alot of historical buildings, including Little Malvern Priory, which is again supposed to be haunted. The villages in the Malvern area, such as Colwall and Cradley are equally pretty and historical. Now I come to my home town, Upton Upon Severn. The pepperpot stands next to the river, the remains of a church which has now become a museum of sorts. There are many ancient buildings which are now shops, including Cromwells Chocolate shop, which has links with Oliver Cromwell. There is also a cholera burial ground near the rugby pitch, and the memorials to war and plague victims show the sad past of this old market town. 5. Countryside and walking Aslong as you are physically capable, you can't visit Worcestershire without going for a walk on the beautiful Malvern hills. Climb the British Camp to see the giants cave, or take a different route and go up the 99 steps to Saint Anne's Well for a drink of refreshing malvern spring water straight from the depths of the Hills themselves. The Malvern Hills are ten miles from end to end, and walking the distance is a lovely way to spend a day. Golden Valley Lake is a less strenuous area for a walk and a picnic, aslong as you don't mind sharing your lunch with the geese! 6. Music Worcestershire was the birthplace of Edward Elgar, one of the greatest classical composers. You can follow the Elgar trail to see where he spent his time. The English Symphony Orchestra rehearse and regularly perform in Malvern, particularly at the three counties showground. Go to a tourist information office to find out when they are performing. November the 5th generally brings them to the showground for a gala concert and firework and lazer display. Nigel Kennedy is also from the area, and if you're lucky you might catch a free performance by this great violinist in the lamb pub in West Malvern, where he drinks and often plays. If Jazz is more your scene, try the Upton Upon Severn Jazz festival, the last weekend in June every year. The town comes alive with bands and spectators, and it's a lovely atmosphere in the pubs and outside by the river. 7. Where to stay The Giffard Hotel in Worcester is supposed to be excellent, as is the White Lion in Upton Upon Severn. However, I have obviously never needed to stay in anywhere other than my own home, so I would suggest that you look in the tourist information office for hotel info. I hope that you enjoyed my op, and that you'll soon be paying a visit to my lovely county, if you haven't done so already!

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              29.01.2001 23:09
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              I recently visited Worcester with my partner who was on a course there for two days. This meant that I had to amuse myself in Worcester during the day whilst he was working (sounds good to me!) I was very impressed with the shopping centre. There is a good mixture of the well-known department stores and other more intimate gift and specialist shops. These are set in a number of airy shopping malls, as well as in the streets outside. The cathedral is very impressive with its 14th century tower, which dominates the town. The cathedral itself was started in 1084 and has a wealth of fine carvings depicting all sorts of scenes. It was lovely to spend some quiet time here just walking around, watching, thinking and praying. The coffee shop in the cloisters is worth a visit too, with home made cakes at reasonable prices and they're delicious! Another memorable old building is the 15th century Commandery situated just out of town on the A44, which once served as almshouses for the aged and poor, and is now the Civil War centre. The 18th century Guildhall on High Street displays the armour from the Battle of Worcester in 1651. The Museum of Worcester Porcelain is opposite the Commandery and offers factory tours, a chance to paint a plate, and shopping for both seconds and the perfect Royal Worcester Porcelain. Worcester racecourse is to the north of the town alongside the River Severn and has regular National Hunt meetings from April to November each year. Worcester County Cricket Club is on the other side of the river, directly opposite the main part of the town and has friendly, county and World Cup matches throughout the season. There are some nice walks along the river and plenty of places to sit and read or watch the world go by. You can take a boat trip from the mooring by the side of the main bridge. These are usually about 45 minutes for relaxing and sightseeing but longer trips can be arranged. The re is an abundance of food outlets selling all sorts of meals and snacks so I could get something at lunchtime to keep me going before we went out for a meal together in the evening. The jacket potato stand in the main street sells you enough to feed a small family just in one portion costing around £1.50! On the subject of food I would recommend Ask, an Italian wine bar in town, where we had our evening meal. The food was excellent, the service was ‘spot on’ and the price wasn't too bad either!

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                30.09.2000 05:59
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                I grew up in and around Worcester, and found it offered very little to me as a youngster. As quickly as I could, I migrated to London, and really noticed the contrast between a real city and what Worcester effectively is, a very large town. As a city, Worcester seemed to lack excitement and enlightenment, and I was very glad to get away. However, now I really feel quite attached to the place, and generally love to go back. The city is really quite pleasant in a lot of areas, my favourites being the Cathedral (on back of £10 note), river and cricket ground. Despite a lot of development, the countryside is still close enough, and the influence of rural life still significant. The people do have a singular quality, a good sense of humour, slightly twisted and universally deprecatory, but a healthy cynicism on the whole. It seems to have become a boom town in recent years, with a lot of new business and housing. Fifteen years ago, there was a lot of evidence of depression, lack of investment, and all around the slowly degrading relics of past times. It does have a great history, and the development doesn't seem to have obliterated this, there's still a quirky charm. Transport links are poor, unfortunately, but then Worcester doesn't inspire you to go anywhere in a hurry.

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                  19.08.2000 00:50
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                  We have all said it "I gotta get out of this place", and Worcester is no exception. As with all cities and large towns there are good areas and there are bad areas. When we leave Worcester, which we have done on a couple of occasions, you realise that the place isnt that bad at all. As a general rule - people are friendly (compared to most areas in the south east of england), and prices are not that high. I read somewhere that Worcester is the 5th most desireable place to live in the UK (taking into account everything from house prices, work, enviroment, people..etc...), and I can understand why. There are better places, I am sure, but I am yet to live there. We live in the South West of Englan now, and love it, but I am sure we will go back to Worcester again eventually....

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                  14.07.2000 19:20
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                  i think it might be fair to say that Worcester has something for everyone! Lets start with the shops.....the Crowngate Centre is clean and easy to navigate around. All the major chain stores can be found....C&A, Marks And Spencers, Debenhams as well as stores aimed at younger age groups, River Island, Top Shop, New Look to name a few. Worcester's shopping keeps on growing with the most recent addition being Warehouse and the next to be a Gap store. Add to all these shops, small more individual shops such as Krunch and Mustard and all your clothing needs are catered for! And just in case clothes aren't your thing Worcester boasts an HMV, Our Price, Magpie Records, Andy's Records, Woolworths, WH Smiths, Waterstones, plenty of specialist shoe shops and the Party Shop to name a few others! Entertainment is easy to find in Worcester day or night. The well established Odeon always has the latest blockbusters, friendly staff and an adjoining Hagaan Daz! On the main street you can also find Peppers - go their in the day for a coffee (or hot chocolate with whipped cream and marshmallows!) or at night for a drink. There are plenty of pubs and bars scattered around Worcester, as well as top Restaurants. If clubbing is your thing Worcester has three main clubs, Tramps, Torch and Images or the alternative club Gonzos. If live music is your thing then there is the Void where local bands strut their stuff as well as Gonzos, the Mars bar and the King's Head. Another, more unusal form of entertainment can be found onboard one of the river boat shuffles - top music, a bar and dancing as you cruise down the Severn. Tourist might enjoy looking around the cathedral, walking along the river banks or even taking part in one of the night ghost walks!

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                    05.07.2000 22:10

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                    Chester's has to be one of the most amazing mexican restaurant's I have ever been to. It's advisable to book as it's very popular and often caters for large parties. It is located in a relatively quiet back road of Worcester town centre and the actual eating area is in the lower part of the building, which means you don't get passers by looking at what your eating!! But there are tables in the top part too which means people with limited mobility are catered for too. The food is an excellent price and you gets loads of it, which makes it extremely good value for money. I have never really tried that many mexican dishes, purely for the fact that I have never really understood what they are, but the menu is informative and details all the dishes. The range of food is great and vegetarians are well catered for as well. In fact the only down side is that the nacho's for the starter were so mountainous I couldn't finish my main course!!!!!! The atmosphere is warm, the staff friendly and willing to help and the service is prompt. I can't think of a better night out in Worcester.

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                    02.07.2000 20:30
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                    Okay so here's the hard sell on my home town Worcester! Worcester, unlike its neighbour Malvern, does its jolly best to rip down buildings of architectural beauty and replace them with attractive concrete monstrosities instead. Despite the fact that Worcester is a relatively large place - and a City! we have almost no facilities to be proud of. Our swimming pool frequently hits the local headlines for its dirty and smelly changing rooms, our football club is housed in pokey surroundings and performs dismally, and although our Rugby team has some claims to fame most people in Worcester have never visited it. We do have a very nice Cathedral ( but even the locals have to make voluntary donations to get inside ) and of course there is the river ( we play spot the bobbing drunk to pass the time ) The swans are all very nice but every year the pensioners have to go out in full force to prevent rotton kids from abusing the cygnets. As far as nightlife goes we have our fair share of dope heads and lager louts and Saturday nights our streets are full of the dregs of Worcester's humanity. For the tourist Worcester can offer frequent National Front Marches and overpriced cups of coffee. If you fancy hiring a barge and taking a leisurely ride up the canal you can expect to inhale the sweet aroma of inner city waste whilst turning a deaf ear to irate fisherman that think they own the place. Visit at your peril!

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