Welcome! Log in or Register

Canon EOS 10D

  • image
£42.49 Best Offer by: digitaltoyshop.com See more offers
6 Reviews
  • Reliability
  • Not for everyone - a little OTT just for holiday snaps
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      26.06.2009 17:58

      Advantages

      • Reliability
      • Reliability

      Disadvantages

      Much better value then any of the plastic Canons

      I love my 10D, it is my favourite bit if kit. Sure it is weighty but that's because it is built like a tank and can take things that cheaper plastic Canon's can't. It is definitely built to last. It produces great pics and I find it's controls a lot more instinctive than many other cameras I've used, they aren't put in silly places and are quick to access (again not like many other cameras where you have to go through a million different screens just to change the ISO). I actually own two now as I shoot weddings and like to keep a different lens on each. I did have a 300D as it is based on the 10D and it's lighter but it just didn't compare. Great camera for photographers wanting to progress towards pro level but can't stretch to the prices of a 5D or 1D. Usually can be picked up really cheaply second hand now but they don't tend to lose their quality because of their rugged build.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      04.03.2007 19:23
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • Reliability
      • Reliability

      Disadvantages

      Perfect for those on a budget, or looking to get into DSLR

      I've been using a Canon 10D for 2 years as a photographer, and have found it to be pretty much flawless.

      It's metal enclosure means it's very suited to a more rough and tumble style of photography, and whilst it's bigger and heavier than the pure consumer versions, it all helps in steadying your shot as the camera just feels 'right'. You'll also find yourself a lot less paranoid about slinging it over your shoulder / into a bag whilst you clamber up an enbankment for the next shot.

      The picture quality is superb, although it's 6.3MP is starting to look a little dated against more of the latest prosumer offerings. In all fairness, you'll only notice this when taking pictures for print work, so it's no big deal.

      The settings for the camera are also very good, anyone will be able to get great results in all conditions simply by using the automatic settings, including sports and low light. When you want to go 'pro' and fiddle with the settings yourself, access to all the common controls can be had without taking your hands off the firing position.

      About the only gripe I have with this camera is the low buffer rate, and occasionally the write speed. These issues have been addressed in more recent prosumer cameras, and the write speed can be fixed by using good quality flash media.

      Whilst I'll personally be looking to upgrade shortly, I can wholeheartedly recommend a Canon 10D to anyone on a budget, or who wants to give Digital SLR a go without breaking the bank. The great news is all the lens etc you'll buy for your 10D will fit onto anything you upgrade to in the future.

      As a nice aside, I've noticed that the size and look of the camera instantly makes people think you're a Pro! Seriously, people just get out of the way for you, which is handy when, like me, you take a lot of band photography (or you just want to push in front of a crowd).

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      19.09.2006 19:43
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      • Reliability
      • Reliability

      Disadvantages

      GREAT PICTURES FROM EVERY SETTING

      Superb camera, with only two defects - dust on the sensors and start time could be quicker. Enough functions and settings to keep serious amateurs happy. The ability to to set the colour saturation and contrast to your own preference, results in images ready to print, without the need to waste time on your pc. Even switched to automatic settings, the camera appears to be able to read every situation and produces superb results. My wife can even obtain good results !

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        22.11.2005 17:11
        Not Helpful
        (Rating)
        5 Comments

        Advantages

        • Reliability
        • Reliability

        Disadvantages

        canon eos10d, still the best value quality camera out there

        Do not waste your time with a 350D, spend the extra few hundred quid and get a 10d or the newer 20d, there is a world of difference as me and a friend found out. I have had the 10d for over a year now and a frine dof mine who had read reviews was convinced the 350 was as good, just a cheaper body. I can confirm that there is a world of diference, the sensor is not the same, the metering system is inferior and there are many other differences between the 2.

        Dont get me wrong the 350 is a fantastic camera, but I just dont see the point when the 10d is so much better, especially the quality of hte body, it really is going to las ta lifetime and the second hand values are far higher as well

        Treat yourself and buy a 10d, if you get anything else you will just end up upgrading.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          06.07.2004 03:48
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          3 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Now this is one serious bit of photography kit, a veritable Rolls Royce of digital cameras. PC Pro, in a general article on the Cannon range in March 2003, said: ?For the more serious amateur and professional photographers, Canon has also released the £1275 EOS 10D, which succeeds the EOS D60. A 6.4 million pixel digital SLR with a seven point wide area autofocus system, it is the first digital SLR camera to feature Direct Print capability. It can save images simultaneously in both RAW and JPEG formats, with a choice of six JPEG file sizes. It covers ISO 100-1600, adheres to the Adobe RGB Colour Space standard and can support large capacity Compact Flash memory cards of over 2Gb storage size.? I don?t know about you, but very little of that flash techie nonsense actually makes an awful lot of sense to me, so it?s as well to stick to the knitting of layman speak. First of all, price ? A quick look around the Kelkoo site, demonstrates that the EOS 10D varies in price between £929 at 7dayshop.com right up to £1,224 at dabs.com, and that pricing range shows what sort of mark up the suppliers and distributors put on these beauties, but I guess if you can afford a grand for a digital camera, then a couple of hundred either way won?t make that much of a difference. Still, why should you pay £300 more for no great benefit? The EOS 10D is worth every penny of whatever you pay for it (!!) because it?s the sort of machine where quality is everything. It?s a big, chunky, relatively old fashioned black bit of hardware in a retro stylee which smacks of class ? with a beefy resolution of some 6.5 megapixels, which is one of the highest specifications around in the affor
          dable camera market, and it can generate really faithful photographic reproductions right up to an output of 13 by 9 inch prints, although it claims that 24 by 36 is also acceptable at a distance. However, if you want such mammoth canvases then you?re probably financially equipped to buy a more expensive machine. 13 by 9 is quite acceptable as far as I am concerned, and my own little foibles restrict me to viewing on PC screen rather than paper (even glossy) prints. The EOS 10D is in many ways like the standard single lens reflex camera, and has many of the techie tricks which you?d normally associate with that sort of machine, ?It has an optical viewfinder, a shutter, and a mirror. Its operating modes, autofocus, autoexposure, and main and quick control dials are derived from EOS film cameras. It feels very sturdy, thanks to the magnesium body.? (http://www.normankoren.com/EOS-10D.html for full details of an anorak?s view). You have to pay extra if you want the optional AC charger for the optional rechargeable battery pack, and at about fifty quid, such extras soon start adding up to a BIG deal, especially when you need to buy a lens and a memory card, which are essential requirements, while you will also need to fork out for a card reader if you haven?t already got one. In my case, as a not too keen amateur, I?d far sooner just opt for a reasonably comprehensive and complete package at more like four or five hundred quid, but I suppose the seasoned aspiring professional likes to buy bits and pieces to customise yer basic pack. Not me, but you can understand the attraction, a bit like buying hifi separates rather than a ready made midi system --- snob value reigns supreme? The EOS 10D produces really sharp, high quality reproductions, but then what else would you expect at the price? However,
          these days you can get very acceptable photos at very minimal cost and I?m not sure that the price premium really pays off when buying this sort of machine, but what the hell do I know? What I do know is that when you compare the EOS 10D to other cameras in the same class then it comes out feeling pretty bloody good, it?s just that I?m not sure that the improvement over yer bog standard item is worth double the price, but then I?m just a miserly old man. Canon have built a strong reputation in the digital camera market, especially at the top end and the EOS 10D maintains that excellent rep, which is very well deserved. Price is a bit of a stinker, but big boys do love their expensive big toys. It?s just that it?s sometimes hard to convince the wife to let you splash?

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            15.08.2003 23:22
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            4 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            • "Not for everyone - a little OTT just for holiday snaps"

            After a lot of vacillating, I bought this camera despite the penury into which it will no doubt cause me to slide. My previous camera, the excellent Canon EOS 500N, decided to shuffle off its mortal coil about a week before the expected birth of my first child, so I thought I'd treat myself to a new digital camera - explaining to my wife that we had to have something to record the little cherub's first few days. The options are quite extraordinary, from tiny point-and-shoot jobs, to wildly expensive professional SLRs, and I had little time to familiarise myself with the concepts of megapixels and white balance. However, I have used an SLR since a small premium bond win about 25 years ago, and would regard myself as an experienced amateur, having (some time ago) done of my own developing and printing, and even earned a little pocket-money taking sports photos at college. So I naturally favoured an SLR-type camera, and when I found one that I could use my existing lenses on, that pretty much sealed the deal, despite the £1,240 Amazon price tag. The reviews (both professional and amateur) that I read were almost unanimously positive, although there were a few quibbles about the white balance, focusing in low light, and a lack of spot metering – and the 10D always comes top in tests against its more expensive peers. So, after only three days (Amazon initially gave a four to six week delivery estimate), the new gadget arrived and, so far, I am more than impressed by the sheer quality of the D10, although there are a few minor irritations, which I’ll come to later. First of all, the camera just feels utterly solid and professional – for anyone who has used any of the more recent Canon EOS models, they are extremely light, and feel a little frail – not so with the D10 – it’s a perfect weight, and I’m sure you could run over its magnesium body in a truck and it would barely register. I
            t seems to fit perfectly in the hands, and the numerous buttons and the two control wheels are all easy to access and use. I knew I’d made the right decision the moment I pulled the thing from its box. However, there are just a couple of things to think about – you can’t use the camera straight away. There’s just enough juice in the (supplied) rechargeable cell to check that it powers up and the autofocus works. You then have to charge the battery in the (supplied) charger for 90 minutes. Also, Canon does not see fit to provide even a token flash card with the unit, so a more careless buyer may have to go back to the shop, or online, to buy one. Mild irritations I know, but why on earth doesn’t Canon provide a card with such an expensive piece of kit? It turns out, however, that when you register the D10 on line, Canon promises to send you a 64MB card, which is some compensation. Now, I have not performed what I would consider to be a full test of the camera because as all first time parents know, there is no time to read bulky manuals (one for the camera, one for the accompanying software) during the first three weeks of your new kid’s life – so this is really a first impression, which I may be able to update later when I’ve had time to experiment. And my initial impression is that this is a brilliant camera: the 7-point autofocus is pin sharp, the colours (as viewed on my PC and as printed out on an Epson Photo printer) are rich and, although I haven’t examined the shots pixel by pixel, the white balance seems fine, compensating for the ambient or flash lighting very well indeed. For pickier snappers, the camera offers a white balance bracketing option, just to make sure you get it right. Unlike many digital cameras, this one is quick, and shoots when the button is pressed, rather than at some indeterminate time in the future. It will also fire off nine shots in thre
            e seconds, even on the RAW or large JPEG settings, the most memory hungry of the several picture quality settings available. The LCD screen on the back is bright and clear, and is used for all the menu driven settings for the camera, as well as for reviewing pictures taken. It features an incrementally resolving picture so that you can scroll through very quickly while reviewing pictures taken. You can also zoom into your photos by a factor of 10, and pan around them. Basically the D10 has all the features of a top end 35mm SLR plus a large number of features specific to the digital world. Included with the camera body, the battery and charger are a strap, a USB cable, and a video cable (to show photos on the TV without downloading to a PC). In terms of software, there is a proprietary viewing and editing program, and a full version of Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0 (which came as a complete surprise – I had to send back the one I ordered from Amazon). I’m sure there are reviews of Photoshop Elements elsewhere on this site – but my impression is that it’s a powerful editing suite the surface of which I have so far barely scratched. The process of taking a photo of the little bundle, transferring said photo to the PC’s hard drive, resizing it to a more sensible 300KB and e-mailing it to a doting grandparent takes rather less than two minutes. And the sheer quality of the shots (even after taking into account my natural talent with a lens!) has been remarked upon by several recipients – and I haven’t used any of the camera’s more creative settings yet. So, if your budget stretches this far, there really is no better option (yet), although there are obviously cheaper (but high quality) alternatives for those unlikely to stray from the basic automatic point-and-shoot configuration – my particular favourite being the Olympus C5050 Zoom. But be warned – buying the
            camera is not the end of the expense – you will need a decent size memory card (in addition to the one that you will eventually receive from Canon if you register), and possibly a card reader at the absolute minimum. A 500MB compact flash seems to store about 180 shots at large JPEG setting. In addition, to make the most of your purchase, you will need a decent PC with a big hard drive and a CD or DVD writer to store all those glorious photos. I also plan to use the online services provided by the likes of Boots and Bonusprint to get high quality prints and enlargements of my favourites - although a high spec printer has mysteriously made its way onto my wish list...

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • Product Details

            The EOS 10D's 6.3 megapixel Canon CMOS sensor delivers superbly detailed images, and 7-point high-speed AF allows precise focusing over a wide area.

            A powerful DIGIC (DIGital Imaging Core) processor optimizes color rendition. High speed processing means a continuous burst of 9 shots at 3 frames per second is possible. It also extends the camera's battery life.

            The EOS 10D can write RAW and JPEG files simultaneously, while there's a choice of 6 JPEG resolution settings.

            For enhanced exposure stability, the EOS 10D has a new evaluative metering system for both daylight and flash. As well as sRGB, the EOS 10D features Adobe RGB. This improves color rendition by capturing colors across an extremely wide spectrum.

            An ISO speed range from 100 - 1600 (3200 Extended HI accessible via the ISO expansion menu) offers extensive shooting flexibility whatever the lighting conditions.

            9 white balance modes are available ­ Auto, Daylight, Shade, Cloudy, Tungsten, Fluorescent, Flash, Custom and Color Temperature. In Color Temperature mode, users manually select the warmth they require from the Kelvin scale (2800K to 10000K in 100K increments). With White Balance Bracketing, the EOS 10D automatically captures three bracketed shots (normal, reddish and bluish) with one release of the shutter.

            An Intelligent Orientation Sensor detects whether the camera is being held horizontally or vertically when shooting. This gives more accurate exposures. It also means easy viewing and editing, since shots appear the right way up on the LCD, in ZoomBrowser on the computer screen or on TV.

            The EOS 10D's LCD offers 5 levels of brightness. It can be brightened so it's easier to see or dimmed so it's less intrusive and saves power. The menu display offers the choice of 12 different languages.

            With a robust magnesium alloy body, the EOS 10D has outstanding durability and a distinctive presence. It features an ergonomic hand-grip which makes extended shooting very comfortable.

            The EOS 10D is the first digital EOS camera to feature Direct Print. High-resolution prints can be obtained by connecting straight to a Canon Bubble Jet or Card Photo Printer.

            The EOS 10D has FAT 16/32 data storage, allowing compatibility with high capacity CF cards over 2GB. The EOS 10D is compatible with the extensive EOS range of accessories.