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Kodak Easyshare CX6330

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    8 Reviews
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      15.07.2012 23:53
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      old camera which takes decent photo's

      The Kodac EasyShare CX6330 was the first digital camera I ever owned. I purchased the camera in 2004 in my first year of 6th Form with the intension to use to help my A Level artwork and for a trip to Spain that I was planning that summer.

      I wanted something that would take big decent pictures and if anyone remembers at the time mobile phones weren't as good as they are now - I owned a Sharp phone at that time which was one of the most decent phones around and it had a built in camera. The trouble was the photos on them phones came out very tiny and you needed a degree in computing to actually get the pictures off the phone! This was no good for me...

      This camera was recommended to me by a friend who had also purchased the model - and I was very impressed with the results in her photos and how easy the camera was to use.

      Appearance-wise this camera is silver in colour and the front of the camera and the shutter is situated to the right side. A big portion of the front is taken up by the flash section and to the bottom centre it gives you the brand name, model and model number. It also states the spec of the camera is 3.1 mega pixels.

      On the other side of the camera you have a decent size LCD screen, that you see on many modern digital camera's these days - just like the modern day camera's the screen is here to view the menu and to take photos (and not having to look through the eye hole to do this). The general set up is very easy to use and in my opinion a lot less complicated to many digital camera's that have come out since. The buttons clockwide on the back are to Delete, Flash, Zoom in/out, Menu, Review, Share and a circular up/down/left/right/ok button for the main menu. As previously mentioned the menu is so easy to use a child could operate it. The Share button mentioned on the back I have never tried this but is to be used with a dock that can be purchased seperately for easy file sharing.

      When you are looking at the back of the camera, to the right on the side of the camera there is a lid that you can slide open. There is one slot to connect your computer to the camera to retrieve files (a lead is provided when you purchase the camera), a slot to hold a memory card and a slot for video playback (to connect to your TV). The camera is compatible with SanDisk memory cards and holds a total of 16mb internal memory.

      There is a few different modes you can use on this camera. You have Automatic mode, which to be honest was the one I used the most as I just wanted to take photo's and I wasn't really the best of photographers! Night mode was one I used on some occasions which was handy for in a dark pub or outside at night-time. Landscape mode was an option I maybe used once or twice to take some test pictures of the scenery around the Lake District where I live. There is also a Close Up mode which is suitable for taking photo's at close range - I believe I tried this one once and to me it was a bit distorted - you will better off using the automatic mode instead. The final mode is the burst mode which allows you to take up to 3 photo's at once.

      As well as the different mode settings you also have three options for colour shooting - colour, sepia and black & white.

      On top of the photo shoot and colour modes you also have the option to video footage but the total you can film is limited to just a couple of minutes. You can play back video footage on the camera no problem but due to no speakers you could never hear sound. I didn't think it recorded sound until once when I viewed a video on my PC and the sound was played back perfectly on there.

      As well as the different shoot modes, colour modes and video mode you also have a built in 10 second timer - which is great for getting everyone, including the photographer in the picture!

      The zoom quality on this camera is as follows :

      3X optical zoom, 37-111 mm (35 mm equivalent) 3.3X Advanced Digital Zoom 10X

      ... And the focus distance unless you are taking a landscape photo is 2ft.

      If you are a serious photographer and want to get every detail in your photos this is definetely not the camera for you. The reason I say this is because although in my opinion the photo's do come out very nice it doesn't capture detail well - meaning if you are taking a photo with someone with a spot on their face it will not capture this detail very well - which can actually be a good thing.

      My favourite bits of the camera have to be how light and compact it is for its time - weighing less than 200g with batteries and the dimensions are WxHxD: 102.5x65x38 mm. Fits very nicely into any bag and you barely notice its there. Great for days out / nights out.

      The worst thing I hate about this camera is that it is battery operated - it requires 2x AA batteries which can be inserted when you slide off a lid to the bottom of the camera. More modern camera's you can just connect by a USB or to a plug and it will charge for you. However if you like the camera and this is a big issue for you, you can buy an extra accessory - KODAK EASYSHARE Camera Dock 6000, which will fully charge the camera in less than 3 hours and makes it a bit easier for uploading to your computer. Unfortunately I never had the dock so I was forever having to replace the batteries with the overpriced specially made ones for digital camera's.

      About two years ago I upgraded to a higher spec camera from Samsung. The lense shutter on my new one broke within a month and was sent back without any damage done by myself. This Kodak camera is still used on rare occasion by myself as a spare and in the 8 years I have had it I have never had any issues with it - just the odd scratch due to wear and tear.

      I still like to take this one on nights out as I am aware if I lost it, it wouldn't cost as much to replace as a newer one.

      **********

      The Kodak CX series has been replaced over the years with the C series - which is now Kodaks lower priced camera group. The CX series is no longer in production but when I have checked on ebay these are with starting bids as low as £10. In my opinion this camera would suit someone who was worried about having to replace a more expensive camera if lost whilst still achieving quality photo's. It would make a great holiday or festival camera.

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      04.09.2006 11:19
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      Excellent value if you can get hold of one.

      We got this camera through a pallet of catalogue returns on eBay and what a good enclosure it was. My husband has a much more sophisticated camera so this one was passed to me, for me to use on the constant bombardment of pictures my computer receives from me, of the kids. In its time it would have been a high quality camera, however as time moves on this is now regarded as an entry level camera.

      The Camera

      The camera itself is very well shaped and has indents that fit your grip perfectly and allow you to keep your fingers away from the lens etc. All the buttons required are either on the top or back of the camera so you will not accidentally press something while taking photos that ruins that longed for perfect shot.

      Using the Camera.

      On top there is a dial switch to change the photo type you are taking, for instance if you are taking general pictures during the day (inside or out) it is best to use the setting “Auto” as this will ensure auto focus, and flash are on. This is the setting I use the most but in addition to that there are also settings for nighttime picture taking, sports mode (for moving objects), landscape and close ups. I would not really recommend the night-time setting if the subject is too far away and you need the zoom, as when we used it while on holiday to try and capture shots of the entertainment crew, they would not focus properly and always seemed to come out very blurry. The night setting is great for close up shots though in the dark and we have plenty of good ones of our party during the evenings. However we also found that using the viewfinder screen to take pictures in the dark was extremely difficult, as it does not light up your subject, so you have to almost guess where the subject is as the screen is very dark. This can be a pain but is manageable.

      This camera is great as it also has a video option on it. You can take short video clips of whatever you like and these are stored alongside your pictures on the memory card. The video clips have sound and are perfect for capturing first time events without lugging out the camcorder. We captured both our youngest swimming un-aided while on holiday and these are now stored for eternity on our computer.

      The screen on the back of the camera is about 3cm by 2.5cm, so not the largest viewer around but certainly big enough for my needs. This also shows all the various settings in words on here, to let you know which one you have chosen. As well as using the screen to line up potential photos you could always use the view finder screen by holding the camera up to your face and looking through the small hole. I always prefer the screen as it is a lot easier to see the photo you will take.

      Once you have taken your pictures they are stored either internally on the cameras memory, or on an SD card, which is brought separately and easily slotted into the compartment on the side of the camera. During your photography session you can review the photos you have already taken on the screen and chose to keep or delete. We have found this to be a great feature as before we brought a bigger memory card, we had one that only held 56 or so photos (depending on the camera quality setting) and if we were away for a few days and unable to unload the card onto our computer, we could view them on the camera and delete if no good, freeing up valuable space for better photos.

      There is so much you can do to personalise and change the settings on this camera that it really took me ages to get to know everything, and even now I have to refer to the users manual for certain things that don’t get used very much. One of my favourite settings on it is the colour mode. You can change it easily via the menu system to take either colour, black & white or sepia photos and I love to mess around trying my hand at making things look different. The black and white and sepia are just as clear as the colour and make it interesting in shots of the kids and for weddings to have something in a softer look. Some of my favourite photos are in black and white.

      The numerous other settings allow you to, for example, date stamp the date on the photos, and this will only show up once they have been downloaded. You can also change the settings to share your photos in emails etc. This is a slightly more complicated process and one that I haven’t used but as long as you follow the instructions in the manual and use the software provided, you should not have any problems. You have self timer facilities too so, if like me, you are the one always taking pictures and never seem to appear in them, you can at least get a few shots of yourself to prove you were at the stated event!

      Picture Quality.

      I have been really pleased with the pictures I have taken, both inside and out. I always use the “Best” setting on the camera to take the highest quality pictures and once downloaded to my computer, they usually have extreme clarity and are sharp and in focus. Any that don’t cut it are mainly due to user error, where I have not kept the camera particularly still whilst pressing the shutter or if the subject is too far away. The zoom function allows you to get really close and the picture clarity remains excellent.

      The one thing I have found though is the excessive amount of red-eye. About 90% of photos, when the subject is looking straight at the camera, especially inside shots, have red-eye. There is a facility on the Kodak software to edit this once the pictures are downloaded but we use a separate software package, independent of Kodak, on the individual pictures we wish to print or that are special. This is due to the fact that we always use an SD card for memory storage and this can be removed from the camera, popped into your computer slot and downloaded with extreme ease and efficiency, cutting out the longer winded process of using USB cables etc.

      Overall

      This has to be an excellent camera for anyone to use for family & friends shots or events in your personal life like weddings, birthdays etc. I would not recommend it for the more professional photographer as there are far superior products on the market but for me, and my limited knowledge of all things technical, this fits the bill.

      It is a nice size and shape and does not pose a problem in terms of fitting in your handbag. The controls are easy to use and are straightforward, allowing you to quickly change to the appropriate setting in order to get optimum picture quality and results.

      Priced at extremely reasonable prices from eBay and other second hand sites, I cannot see it on Kodak’s online shop anymore so maybe it has been superseded now, you cannot afford to be without this camera. I have taken hundreds of photos on mine and except for a couple of memory cards and some rechargeable batteries (it eats normal ones extremely quickly) it has not cost me any more money. Having previously always had cameras where you load film and get it developed, this was a breath of fresh air, being able to see the photo I had taken immediately and keep or delete. Being able to download to my computer and chose the ones to print, either by Boots photo service or what we do, which is crop, rotate and edit at home and print from our colour inkjet onto photo quality paper is so great. The results are amazing and you can blow them up to A4 if you choose. We have given many presents to parents etc of photos we have taken, which has the benefit of being in a relaxed atmosphere at home and taking your time. The best shots are taken when they are not posed.

      As I said for good quality pictures in an easy to use fashion I would totally recommend trying to get hold of one of these.

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        24.04.2006 10:09
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        For the novice photographer up to an experience amateur

        My Kodak EasyShare sure lives up to its name - it's easy to share photos taken with it and of all the other cameras I've played with so far (in the shops or tried out friend's cameras) it comes across as by far the easiest to use!

        I've been looking for an excuse to upgrade to a higher spec model but the photos taken with my CX6330 are of such good quality (for my needs anyway) that I can't justify the expense of getting a new camera. Plus the fact that this model has served me well and has had no mechanical faults at all.

        I've had the Kodak CX6630 (3.1 mega pixels*) for nearly 4 years now and I still adore it. It comes with its own software CD (Kodak EasyShare) to load on your PC with features such as red-eye reduction.


        ~*~PRICING~*~

        I paid £149.99 for my camera at Dixons as it was on sale, the normal price at the time was £199.99. As expected they tried to sell me the extended guarantee for a third of the price (about £50) but I declined - I've had no mechanical defects with it to date, so there Dixons! You can also buy a printer dock with it, which I didn't opt to buy, so I'm sorry I can't give you any information about it - but this is available for about £80 (or less if you shop around).


        ~*~USING IT~*~

        The camera itself is pretty easy to use. There are three resolution settings - "Good", "Better" and "Best". Pictures taken at "Best" are usually about 1Mb each in size and at "Good" they are about 300Kb each.

        You can time and date stamp your photos or even choose to have them in black and white. There's Auto mode (self explanatory I guess but not all that good at the auto-focus when used at night), Sport mode - for subjects in motion , Night-time mode (best to use this indoors in the evenings as auto-focus doesn't come out too clearly), Landscape - for distant scenery, Closeup mode - for subjects less than 28 inches away and you can even take short video clips for up to 2 minutes or so - but be warned - a 10 second video clip can take up as much memory as 5Mb.

        You can magnify the photos you've taken on the view screen up to 4 times whilst still on the camera. And of course, you can delete individual pictures or all of them in one go. You can review the pictures as you go along and decide which ones to keep or delete. I tend to keep the Liveview feature off (Liveview shows you a 1 inch by 1.5 inch screen with live feed) as this uses the battery power up pretty fast.

        There's also a zoom button but I find that when you zoom in close to subjects the picture quality leaves a lot to be desired, so I usually end up standing really close to things/people I want a closeup of. The 3x zoom feature on the CX6330 is equivalent to a 37-111mm zoom on a regular 35mm lens camera.

        The camera comes with a USB lead to connect to your PC and easily download photos. Once connected you can quickly download your photos and decide whether you want to reduce red eye, sharpen images, lighten/darken them, etc. These days I tend to just take out the SD card and insert into the relevant slot on my PC, it takes just moments to download my photos this way and saves all the hassle of playing around with cables.

        The only issue I have with the features when using the EasyShare software is that it's quite tedious and can be slow.

        I'd definitely recommend getting some rechargeable batteries to use with your Kodak as these cameras drink battery power like water - but then again I guess this applies to most other digital cameras out there, unless someone's not telling me something? Using the "live feed" tends to use up battery power even more so I tend to keep this feature switched off.


        ~*~PRINTING~*~

        It works out fairly economical to get your digital photos printed professionally - all I do is save the photos I want onto a CD and take it down the local print shop - they charge about £8 for up to 70 photos to be developed.

        Printing your photos from your colour or black & white deskjet/inkjet/laser printer is fairly easy. Hopefully you already know how to insert pictures into your regular software such as Word, PowerPoint or Publisher and then print as normal. You may need to change your DPI settings when printing to get clearer prints though.


        ~*~SUMMARY~*~

        I'd say all in all, it's pretty nifty for a first time digital camera user and should be suitable for experienced amateurs (like me)! I've taken over 5000 pictures since I've had mine and built up quite an extensive online photo album of weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, evenings out with colleagues, nights out with friends, etc. My friends all laugh when they see me at social events as I'm always "...armed and dangerous with that camera AGAIN!"



        * the higher the mega pixels on your camera the higher resolution photos you can take with it...

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          04.08.2005 20:20
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          This camera is really easy to use and produces good results despite slow reactions.

          The Kodak easyshare range certainly isn't aimed at the proffesional studio photographer, but this is where its main strength lies. The DX6330 is certainly a click and shoot camera, and this makes it ideal for holidays or family events, where you would simply want to document the events without fancy focus knobs or filters. It also comes with a software package, which provides a basic editing program, meaning that just about anyone can produce a decent looking photo.

          The trouble with this camera is that good unique photo opportunities could be mised with its slow reactions, i.e. there is a delay between pressing the shutter release and the photo being taken. The quality of the image is also low at only 3.1 megapixels, but for its target market this is really all that is required.

          If you have had a chance to come in contact with this model you will notice that it is a hefty piece of camera, and will not fit discreetly into a top pocket or handbag. Also, Kodak charge extra for a carrying case, so this is to be beared in mind when purchasing this camera.

          That said, this camera seems to have got the ease of use and results down to a tee, and this makes this camera very good for amateur photographers or families.

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            18.11.2004 14:39
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            Bought myself a digital camersa in January 2004 to sell stuff on ebay(£20 Agfa) This was as good as £20 would buy and did what i needed at the time I have just bought a CX6330 and it is the golden one It is so easy to use and downloads photos on to computer with ease. It is the best and easiest camera for the money i have seen £99.00 instead of £149 CURRYs. The cammers has movie mode with sound, sports setting, night setting, auto setting, landscape and macro for those realy close pics

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            • More +
              20.10.2004 00:28

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              Top Class Digital Camera - Advantages: Easy to use, Good size LCD screen, Easy to use software - Disadvantages: Quite bulky, Weak plastic door where you plug in USB cable, N/A

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              16.09.2004 11:02
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              Over the weekend, I went out and bought a new camera from Curry’s.
              It was a KODAK CX6330 DIGITAL and I would like to give you an update on this great little camera. It has now gone down in price and I only paid a fantastic £99.87, which for the sort of camera it is I thought was an absolute bargain as to be honest with you I didn’t really want to pay any more than that, infact it wasn’t my choice of camera as I quite fancied the look of something else, but they were out of stock and the guy that serve me was extremely helpful.

              I got it home and had a little play around with it, as I am like a kid with a toy when it comes to buying new things!! It is a fairly easy piece of equipment to use and it didn’t take me long to get to know what to do with it. which I thought was a good thing as the instruction were not that explanatory, so make sure you have a little time to get used to it. The camera has many different modes which once again they are all easy to use. It also comes with the USB cable so you don’t have to purchase this separately but you don’t get a case with this, so I had to lay out for that too.

              After taking many pictures of my cats and my son, I then realised that the memory was full and the pictures that I had taken I wanted to keep. So I decided to transfer them onto my p.c, but there was one catch, I was unable to load the software as I have a slight problem with the drives and am waiting for it to go in for repair.
              In the mean time I decided to log onto the Kodak website and register the camera and much to my surprise at the moment they are offering a free up to date software download, I could not believe my luck so I could now go a head a transfer my pictures on to the p.c. This was also easy to use and it took me just minutes to complete the whole process. It even allows you to edit the pictures so you could change them to how you want them to look.

              You can buy memory cards which I think would be ideal if you go on holiday because you would never have to worry about missing that perfect snapshot moment but they are on the expensive side as the one they tried to sell me was around sixty pounds, for the moment I will just stick to the basics! It also has a video capture option, and once you have done this you is able to view this straight away.

              Features:

              3.1 mega pixel picture resolution 2032 x 1524 pixels
              Prints of up to 11” x 14” although I only printed up to A4 size (excellent quality)
              3x Optical Zoom, 3.3 Advanced Digital Zoom, 10x Total Zoom
              Share Button: On camera picture tagging for printing emailing etc.
              Various Modes: Auto, Sport, Night, Landscape, Close Up & Video
              16MB Internal Memory
              This camera is also compatible with a printer dock
              Memory card slot which is nicely hidden
              Optical viewfinder so that you do not have to view from the screen
              Built in flash which is automatic or has the facility to reduce redeye
              This camera also comes with USB cable.

              Unfortunately my camera had developed a fault in just a few days, every time you turned the dial round to the Auto position there appeared to be no power to it, so I have had to take it back to the store that I purchased it from and I did thankfully get a full refund as I was concerned this could be an ongoing problem and I don’t relish the thought of having to keep back and forth to the store, but at the same time it was probably just a one off I just didn’t want to take the risk. I would recommend this to other potential buyers as it is lightweight and easy to use.

              So guys get snapping!!!!

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                04.05.2004 03:35
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                When it comes to my birthday my better half is normally a bit stuck for ideas on the present front, but as I reached a milestone birthday this year, I was encouraged to think about something that might cost a bit more than the usual wine, chocolates and socks, but something to consider as a more of a momento of me being over the hill. After some discussion I decided to look into digital cameras, having no idea whether they would be worth the money or whether ther were any real benefits in owning one. I already use digital photography at work, so I was well up to speed with the technology involved, and had a fairly good idea what was good and bad about digital but I suppose I took it a bit for granted. We all did a tour of the shops and slowly crossed off the contenders:- Independent retailer - knowledgable but only selling digital zoom cameras (gave me a good tip about batteries though - later) Currys - no help whatsoever Comet - I think the photography expert got the day off, or perhaps the year off. PC World - someone who knew their stuff. I deliberately did not go into Jessops. One camera in particualar took my eye in Currys, but as their assistants were in 'can't you see we're busy - go away' mode, there was little they could tell me about the Easyshare CX6330. PC world had the biggest selection and an assistant that seemed to know his stuff. He pointed out that this camera was not the cheapest but not the most expensive either. Optical zoom was a big plus - there were a number of cameras on display that were digital zoom only, i.e., you could zoom but at the expense of picture resolution. It was light, and pocket size, well coat pocket anyway. There are 5 different shot modes, automatic - for general picture taking, sports - for situtations where the subject is likely to be moving, night time - with a special flash mode, scenery - for distance shots, and
                closeup - for stuff less than 10cm away. I thought at that point he was going to say "an idiot could operate it" rather in the manner of Boycey form Only Fools and Horses. "They connect by USB and the CD is in the box" was the only thing I could fault the assistant on. I know from previous bitter experience that this part of the process can be the most frustrating and stressful if it does not work properly. There is also a video mode that records with sound. The buttons on the back are simple and clear, delete, menu, review and share. Altogether I thought it was a well laid out camera, it had a reputible name attached to it, and it also looked the business - too many of the cameras on display were cheaper and looked it, no more than a credit card with a hole in the front. When not in use the zoom lens is tucked away inside the camera behind a built in lens cap, switch on and the lens automatically appears ready for use. The whole easyshare thing was a bit over the top - a special docking port you could buy for £stupid to organise print and e-share your pictures from - why bother. Let's face it who also has a box in the loft with album after album of photpgraphs that only get to see the light of day a) when the loft gets cleaned out (approx never) b) when the kids need a picture of when they were toddlers to take to school c) when you want a picture to embarass the missus with. so printing was not a high priority for me. I bought one and I am pleased with it. The first negative was predictably with the computer-camera connection. In the box you get a video cable to look at your pictures on the TV, and a USB cable to upload onto your PC. The Easyshare software on the CD would not run on my PC, apparently it is a common fault. I was a bit unhappy about the fact that you had to install the whole Easyshare program even if you only wanted to use the image transfer part
                of the program. I already use Paintshop and decided that I did not want another learning oppurtunity with Kodak software. The camera connection software was the only element you could install separately. With this program you can connect to the PC and your camera appears as a new folder in explorer that you can open and copy files onto your PC hard drive. Apparently the problem with the Easyshare software is well known - they do not like firewalls, or anything else running on USB at the same time, but no mention of this was made in PC World. Another thing to watch is these cameras can eat batteries. The CX6330 takes two AA batteries, and will happily take pictures to fill the internal memory (approx 32MB) a couple of times over. However, the more you use the LCD screen, the more your precious batttery life is lost. I try not to use the LCD monitor for picture taking, it is quite easily turned on and off - and try to limit the review of pictures using the screen only when it is absolutely necessary, i.e., when the camera memory is full. It has already been the case that I have taken pictures and the batteries have expired writing the data to the internal memory, leaving no power for the zoom lens return. I haven't got one yet but I will be investing in a charger in the near future. You can increase the image taking capacity by purchasing additional removeable SD cards - I think they had 256MB available in store. You really do have to be an idiot to take bad pictures with this camera. The pictures I have taken so far have been good clear images with realistic colour reproduction. The one negative I have found on picture taking is that this camera is not so good in low light conditions without flash. Having said that the setting with a special 'in-fill' flash takes great night time pictures, especially indoors. OK digital photography is still a good way off traditional film, but they are good eno
                ugh, I have already submitted one picture to our local paper for a landscape feature, and the published picture in colour looks fine. I thought Kodak would be a good buy, thinking that they know their onions - there are much better camera on the market, but you pay for the privelage of having them. I think this camera is a good value for money purchase form a solid name in the photographic world. I probably take more pictures now than I ever did before, and I am more likely to take the camera out with me than ever before. The tiniest of bitter taste was left when I realised there was no camera case included in the package. I don't think it would have cost a massive amount to include a basic PVC case? However, it does fit neatly into at least two of the now redundant 35mm APS camera cases we have. BP

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              • Product Details

                With the CX6330, you'll get big, beautiful pictures that are too good to keep to yourself. Get amazing-quality prints up to 11"x14" with its 3.1MP. Zoom in and capture crisp details with 3X optical and 3.3X Advanced Digital Zoom, and Kodak Retinar aspheric all-glass lens.