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Konica Digital Revio KD-410Z

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£11.99 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    2 Reviews
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      07.09.2004 18:48
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      I?m one of those people who love a bargain, so when my old camera packed up, I decided to hunt around for the best bargain I could find. After a long trawl through the internet sites, I found the Konica Digital Revio KD410Z for £247 at QED with free delivery. While surfing the net the other week though, I noticed the price had come down to under the £200 mark, so now it?s even more of a bargain. The camera itself has 4 Megapixels, with a maximum resolution of 2300x1700, which I deem to be pretty good by anybodies standards. As the Photo Shop at Asda were having a summer offer of 50 prints for £5, I had some pictures printed there, and you wouldn?t have known they were digital pictures, which can sometimes be a little grainy. I use a 256MB card in my camera, which will give me 140 pictures on the highest resolution, so I never have the need to turn the resolution down, which means that my pictures are of a consistent high quality. Even on my old 64MB card, I was getting 40 shots at highest resolution. Even on a lower setting though, snapshots still come out well. So long as you have good light, the picture quality is brilliant. I do find that when inside dark buildings, the pictures do seem rather grainy. If you are quite technically minded (or follow the instructions in the manual) the exposure and flash settings can be changed, and this does make a difference. Being a bit of a technophobe myself, I just can?t seem to get the hang of this. At this point, I had it over to my husband, who just loves to play with anything technical. The camera has both optical viewfinder and a 1.5? colour LCD screen. This is really useful in string light as the screen can be difficult to see. With automatic focus and exposure control it is a doddle to use. It has a 3x optical zoom, and a 2x digital zoom. I tend not to use the digital zoom as the picture quality definitely deteriorates. It also has a built in automatic flash, so how much eas
      ier does it get? My best experience yet with this camera has to be at my cousins wedding during the summer. I took some beautiful photos of the bride and groom stood posing by the car in black and white and sepia. They are so pleased with the photos as the professional photographer they used didn?t get anything like these as his were all colour. They came out really well. I even took some small movie clips with sound which last about 30 seconds. I don?t think I will use this very often though as 30 sec clips are not really much use. Downloading onto the PC is really simple [well, it has to be where I?m concerned]. Just plug into the USB port with the USB cable provided, and my PC picked it up straight away. It asked if I wanted to copy the pictures, and then I selected where I wanted them copied to, and the rest was done for me! *Some boring bits* ? Supports Memory Stick, Secure Digita, MultiMedia Card (16MB SD card included.) ? It has 2MB of internal memory but I?d recommend at least 128MB extra ? Adobe Photoshop Elements imaging application for Windows and Mac provided ? USB cable for connection to a computer. Driver software is included if your computer doesn?t pick up the device automatically. ? Weighs 200 grams, so it?s not the lightest camera in town, but it is small, and fits handily into my pocket (dimensions 57x94x29.5 mm) ? Comes with neck strap, 16MB SD/MMC card, Lithium battery, Battery charger, USB cable, Two software CD-ROMs, and a quick start manual and registration card. I really love this camera, and the metal body looks sleek and trendy, and is very sturdy. The quick start manual is really easy to follow, but if you want more detail, an Adobe version of the full manual is available on the net. It also has a sliding lens cap, which is an absolute godsend if you are like me, and have a tendency to lose anything that isn?t permanenetly attached. You can also see the p
      ictures and video clips on the screen, so you can delete what you don?t want to make more space on your memory card. Downsides? Poor red eye control. Yes, I have no end of problems with the flash causing red eye, and the little blue light at the bottom of the camera is supposed to stop this, but really, it might as well not be there. Thank goodness for photoshop is all I can say. There is also no camera case with it. I suggest you get one as the metal body does have a tendency to scratch after a while. I love this camera, and am glad I chose it.

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      • More +
        27.08.2003 03:07
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        • "No sound on video"

        INTRO: The Konica Digital Revio KD 100 was the first Megapixel Digital camera with an LCD preview screen to retail on the UK High Street for under £100 and as a camera has been around for quite a while. Whilst its there's now around half a dozen or more 2 Megapixel cameras on sale for the same price as the Revio, with Konica recently introducing the DC 25 retailing at only £10 more, is the KD 100 a good buy or not? Looking around the reviews of this camera on review centre it seems to come in for a hard time from buyers with battery life, image quality driver problems and niggling faults being the main reasons for criticism. Some people were unhappy with the image quality that they returned the camera to the store for a different model, whilst others were disgruntled at the the apparently short battery life, whilst a small minority raved about how pleased they were with the camera. Ratings for the camera varied from a dismal 0 to a full 10. However is it a good camera and does it take good images? And furthermore will you be pleased with it?. To make comparison easy the Jenoptik JDC 2.1 lcd (a 2 Megapixel camera) with a similar retail price, has been used. First Impressions: Out of the box comes a smallish lightweight plastic camera that feels more sturdy and solid once the two Duracell alkalines supplied with the unit are inserted. A leather case is also included with the camera which has a simple but neat feature inside, a small loop to thread the wrist strap through so that when the camera is in use you don't forget where you put it. However, this leaves the case dangling around and you have to keep it tucked aside while you take your photo's, but at least you don't loose your case. Usb and Video out cables together with a Drivers CD and a printed manual complete the package. Upon insertion of the batteries you'd think it would be a simple case of turning the camera on and taking a photo, but alas i
        ts not that simple. Whilst powering on the camera turns the LCD display on top of the camera on, the TFT preview screen stays off. There are 5 buttons in a row to the right of the preview screen and most these are marked with symbols making it slightly confusing. There's no dial or jog dial for menu settings like on other cameras so its sometimes hit and miss selecting modes. Each button has several functions dependant upon whether the menu is on or off. The manual doesn't tell you how you turn the TFT on, just that you turn it on, and it takes a while to realise how to do this. The manual also omits that you don't have to use the screen, so a simple point and shoot first photo takes ages to achieve simply because the user would think the screen had to be turned on in order to capture an image. There's also no dial on top of the camera, but a Mode switch on the rear to select between photo, movie, playback, and video modes. This places an added strain on the button as for example to playback a video clip you have to press it three or four times, then press the shutter button. Its very easy to mistake the up arrow button with the menu button, and the lower ones with each other, and just how many times does one have to press the mode button to view an image? Or to delete it for that matter. There is an inclination here to say that Konica's low end digital cameras are probably made independently, as its latest 2mp The DC20 (see Jessops.co.uk or choice.co.uk) offering is identical to Samsung's basic 2mp camera and a Praktika 2mp as well, whilst its £150 optical zoom offering the KD 2000 is Identical in specs and rear to the Richoh Caplio R 232, the Richoh being identical front and rear to the premier Dc 2302 sold at Amazon.co.uk for a penny under a ton. In fact the Digital camera magazines slated the Caplet for terrible image quality. As Knock's low end digital cameras appear to be rebadged models then does it's budget offer
        ing the KD 100 suffer the same inadequacies and quality issues beloved of cheap Chi/Tiwan-ese manufacturers? Read on dear snappers and all will be revealed to you. On the top of the unit, there's a status LCD that allows you to change image size and quality and flash mode, but the buttons are very small, and its easy to mistake one for the other. This display also shows erratically may it be said, battery life. Battery life is the main gripe of customers and is illustrated well by the following 'fault' with the camera. When the indicator is showing no charge, if you open the battery cover then close it, it will immediately display a half charged set. Also sometimes the camera refused to power on, and again, opening and closing the battery hatch cured the problem. Also, the power switch is not flush with the body making it possible to power it on whilst taking out or returning to the pouch which is handy for draining battery power should you feel the need to give yourself a shock whilst preparing to take that once in a lifetime photo opportunity. Problems like these should not be encountered on brand name cameras, sure on ultra cheap digital models yes maybe a bit of leeway on the quality side is expected, but not with a brand as renowned as Konica. As konica's expensive cameras all receive rave reviews are they trying to get us to buy the expensive models instead, or are they simply saving money at the bottom end by going cheap at the entry level? You must remember that this camera when first sold was the cheapest camera you could get with a preview screen, and was the ONLY Megapixel camera under £100 with a screen, branded name or otherwise. Menu: Menu options are pretty much standard with settings for white balance, exposure compensation, lighting voltage, power off, screen brightness, and auto preview amongst others, though the auto preview when turned on with the TFT preview kept off to achieve optimum battery life just d
        idn't work properly . Nor did the self timer. The playback menu as with most cameras is different to that of normal camera modes, and although images can be deleted on camera, first it asks you if you want to delete the picture, then again with the image number, and finally you have to confirm it. There is no need to show the image and ask if its the one you want deleting, and then show the file number and ask again, it only wastes battery life. Pictures: So, does it take great pictures? Well that depends on your personal opinion or not only on whether or not it's your first digital camera or how expensive your film camera is, but also at what size you view them in your photo editing programme. It has a Cmos sensor which for a major manufacturer is unthinkable and this shows in image quality and noise levels. . The three image quality settings don't make much difference unless you want super sharp prints, but viewing the prints on a computer is a different ball game. The colours are bright, and the auto white balance does a great job, even in indoor tungsten lighting, coming out bright white, and not creamy like some. The auto setting should rarely ever need changing, although on bright days or very overcast ones you might have to turn the auto flash off to avoid over exposure. Exposure on auto setting is excellent too, though some indoor shots in fluorescent lighting came out very, very warm with a creamy tone to them, and the flash operated, whereas other cameras In the same location took a perfect picture without flashing at all. However pictures are not perfect, suffering in two main areas. Firstly, if you are upgrading from a lower resolution camera then images will not seem as sharp as you may expect. Browsing around photo gallery sites, pictures from Cannon, Olympus, Sony, and others are all very much sharper, in fact it's fair to say that the KD Z 100's images are far blurrier, and don't hold comparison, althoug
        h in fairness its impossible to know if the Cannon, Olympus and Sony images were taken with a 1.3 Mp camera or a higher pixel count at the same setting as the KD 100's best There is a certain degree of consistency of sharpness that all digital cameras should have across each image size, but the Konica fails miserably on this. For example an 800 x 600 pixel (450k pixels) image taken on for example a Jenoptik JDC 2.1 Megapixel looks sharper than a 1280 x 1024 pixels (1.3mp) image on the Konica. Now this brings another question to the fore. In most image editing package will be opened at 1x magnification if your monitor is set to 1024x 768 as most 17 monitors are. A 1280 x 1024 pixel image is bigger than the screen resolution and thus opens up at half size. Comparing the sharpness and noise levels of a half sized 1.3 Megapixel Konica image to a 1x magnified image from the aforementioned Jenoptik at 800 x 600 pixels there is not much difference. However display the Konica at the equivalent 1x magnification and the difference is clear. Solid blocks of colour show up very high levels of noise on the Konica, which simply isn't there on the Jenoptik. And as the Jenoptik's images are smaller in size then you'd expect the Konica to produce much better photos than the Jenoptik, but it simply isn't so. Where the Konica does triumph over the Jenoptik is that you need a steadier hand with the Jenoptik than with the Konica, with overtly blurred photos not being much of a problem. However, photos do print out well, though in reality the biggest you can go to achieve a sharp print is half A4 size. If you do get a really clear and sharp photo on it's best setting, then you might just get away with a full A4, though you'll probably have to click the boxes to fit the full quality image onto an A4 sheet.. Although the aforementioned noise problem rears its head slightly, it's not a real problem, provided you go no higher than half A4 size, and it may b
        e down to printer and not the images.. As for the file sizes, this is an anomaly. Two different KD 100's were used for this review (the first having niggling faults) , and the first camera gave best quality 1.3 mp images coming out at just over 1 megabyte. However if you viewed it in an image editor (photo impact being the one in question here) and then sharpened it slightly and saved the image, then the resulting file size averaged 300k. The second camera produced file sizes of around 500k and seemed to produce better images, which given the smaller file sizes remains a mystery. Also on a related note, the manual quoted the number of images possible at each image setting. On best size and quality then 8 images were possible so it said in the manual and on the status lcd. With an empty memory, with 105 at lowest size and quality. This was never exceeded in actual conditions. However, surprisingly the second camera displayed 12 images could be fitted in memory on an empty camera, yet in actual filming 13 were captured.. The lowest quality settings however only displayed 125 images were possible, so if you were expecting say 165 (50 more than quoted in the manual like the highest setting achieved) forget it. Whether the differences between the two cameras were down to Konica improving the camera to bring it into line with other manufacturers, or whether it was a faulty camera is unknown. Also there was a notable parallax effect (viewfinder being out of sync with lens) though with usage it is easy to correct. Video: Where the KD 100 shows its strengths is in it's video mode, but it also shows two annoying weaknesses here as well. Firstly, its images are only 14 seconds long at a time (the manual states 15), and it can only hold two full length clips (more if they are shorter) in the supplied 8 meg memory. It will not take images longer than 14 seconds though in fairness they can be up to 14.99 seconds long and the number of colours in
        the image does not alter file size or length like the Jenoptik does. Movies are very much a Buster Keaton affair, being silent (unlike most others), and playing back with a slight (but just noticeable) jerkiness to playback rather like an old silent movie but not as bad. Also in daylight movies are noticeably over exposed and one turned out almost monochrome. However, using the video out the video's display really well on a TV screen, and can easily be transferred onto video cassette and look good but rather odd without sound. Images view well windows media player, and doubling the playback window size does not reduce quality too much, although the Jenoptik suffered bad loss of quality in this respect. In Tungsten light the images were very dark and slightly grainy, although colours could be made out, unlike the Jenoptik which gave red images under the same conditions. As the Jenoptik's output suffered in media player when the screen size doubled then we can only assume that this was the reason the it doesn't have a video out, and if you want to copy movies onto videotape but aren't bothered about sound then the Konica is perfect, but once you see video with sound, well..... Its like colour photos and monochrome ones. Exposure is generally good, though having only a Cmos sensor outdoor night shots are out as the flash isn't powerful enough. Indoors, the auto white balance is faultless. However on a very cloudy rainy Bank holiday at the zoo the flash kept firing completely washing out the entire picture. Turning the flash off corrected this, but in reality the flash should never have fired at all. The flash itself has four settings: auto, red eye, on and off, but no fill in, night or slow synch modes. Software: The driver loads easily enough, but many users have reported error messages, and some cannot download images but in general, this may well be a printed manual error. The manual states that you should use 'My
        computer' for copying images from the removable drive that appears when its connected. However this is virtually impossible, for individual files are harder to transfer by drag and drop and explorer should be used. Also the camera uses battery power when connected to the camera. This drains the alkalines even more, resulting in corruption of some perfect images during transfer. Compare this to other cameras, (like the Jenoptik) which take their power totally from the usb hub. Although the Driver CD includes MGI photo suite, Net meeting is not included, so win 98 users will not be able to use its web cam mode without downloading it from Microsoft's web site. The MGI software for both Video and Still images is about the best you can get at this price point (hey you weren't expecting photoshop were you?) And is easy to use with lots of hand holding along the way for the more inexperienced user. Extras: The camera came complete with a printed manual which although written in good English, did contain a few omissions such as the LCD screen mentioned earlier. Also it's a multi lingual manual (about 8 versions in 1) , making for a heavier manual loads more paper being used to produce it . Bad on the environment Konica. The case has a nice belt loop, and there's also a video out lead (amazing that some manufactures omit to include a video out lead though the camera has the capability) along with 2 AA Duracells which lasted just over a day. Whether these were shelf drained it's unclear, but the next set of Mitsubishi's lasted about a week, though the screen was not used much. Reliability: As far as reliability goes then the KD 100 is not perfect. Putting it simply, the first camera suffered four main problems. Firstly was the battery power meter reported earlier in this review along with the camera refusing to power on at least three occasions - twice after changing the batteries. Indeed the very first time
        they were changed was when the fault first occurred. Thirdly it wouldn't take a picture every time you pressed the shutter. The light would come on but nothing would happen. Also the same happened trying to use the self timer, the front light would flash once then nothing, though strangely this rectified itself just before the camera was exchanged. Lastly, the auto preview feature hardly worked at all, only seeming to work when activated, then defaulting to off. All in all this signalled an unreliable camera. Surprisingly all these faults except the battery power meter were rectified on the replacement, which suffered an even more serious fault. For no apparent reason the camera was liable to freeze completely after taking a picture. This happened randomly four times over a 5 day period so it was back to the shop for a refund. The biggest bone of contention with users is battery life. Alkalines or rechargeables must be used. The Preview screen used a lot of battery power, but it is possible to turn this off. You can also use video mode solely with the viewfinder, though its not stated how to do it in the manual. Simply press the mode button once and the status display reads 14 seconds. You can then shoot videos without the preview screen. Also, if you minimise the use of the flash to an absolute minimum (that's why dark night clubs eat batteries) then it's possible to get a weeks use (up to 80 ish shots) from two alkalines. As you can get four AA alkalines for a quid in many pound shops its not that heavy on the batteries, though NiMh's are a much better bet. OVERALL: So in summary, compared to similarly priced cameras the Revio falls down on Specification (Konica is the only major manufacturer still making its entry level camera only a 1.3 Megapixel affair - with the exception of Fuji, who's Axia slimshot is actually a clone model also sold as an Oregon Scientific ) which is way is below par, as is image quality. Wit
        h nothing really to recommend it except it's video out, its an expensive buy, considering that you can now buy 2 Megapixel cameras for the same price, and for just £10 more Amazon are selling a 2 Megapixel camera with an Optical zoom. Even with a £10 price cut to £90 its not a good buy as Konica themselves have just introduced the DC 20 a 2 Megapixel camera selling for £100 (which is the same as the Praktika and Samsung models mentioned earlier and the Praktica's appear to be generating excellent reviews). All in all this Revio speaks for itself. Should anyone wish to compare images taken with this camera and the aforementioned Jenoptik JDC 2.1 please e-mail callan_stevens@hotmail.com and a selection will be sent out.

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      • Product Details

        The amazing Konica KD-410Z is the new generation of digital cameras. It's the smallest and slimmest in the 4 megapixel, optical 3x zoom class. It's also the first digital camera to accept both SD Memory Cards and Memory Sticks! This unique Dual Slot technology enables you to capture a higher number of shots without changing the recording media. You could use them for specific purposes - stills on one, movies on the other. You can even copy from one to the other. Having a choice of media makes it possible to transfer images to a wide range of other devices, including PCs, PDAs and mobile phones, simply by selecting the most convenient medium.

        The KD-410Z has an amazingly fast start-up time - a mere 1.3 seconds. From then on, it's the results that will amaze you. By combining a 4.13 megapixel CCD with Konica's 3x Zoom Hexanon lens, the KD-410Z delivers outstanding resolution - even when the image is enlarged. You can comfortably shoot everything in high-resolution too. A built-in resizing function enables images to be directly converted to VGA or QVGA for Internet or e-mail use.

        A clear, bright, LCD monitor presents all the functions on color-coded screens. The three most popular - Play, Display and Delete - can be directly accessed by control buttons. Exposure, focus and white balance are all automatic.

        The KD-410Z offers over 40 different features and functions. For example, you can focus down to 10cms with the Macro facility; combine a slow shutter (down to 1 sec) and flash for exceptional night shots; shoot up to 30 seconds of video - and even add voice notes to your still shots.