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Konica Minolta Dimage X50

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    3 Reviews
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    • More +
      14.06.2006 01:21
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      In a nutshell, everywhere I go, my Dimage X50 goes too!

      I had a Konica Minolta Dimage X20 2.0 megapixel camera when they first arrived on the market and absolutely loved it so when I became the victim of a pickpocket 2 years ago my insurance money went towards the purchase of its big brother, the Dimage X50.

      The camera was offered in red, silver, black or blue - I thought the silver one looked the classiest so had that version.

      I'd read lots of camera reviews before I eventually bought it from an electronics website. At the time it was difficult to find on sale and was quite costly (£219)for a snapper. Most amateur snappers were happy with 2.5/3.0 mega pixels. Anyway, I paid for it on a Saturday morning, was emailed on Sunday to say it had been shipped from France, and it was delivered into my hands on Tuesday morning!

      My first impressions were that it is just as tiny as the X20 and I knew right away I was going to love it.

      I've just checked the spec and can confirm it weighs only 19grammes. The 2 inch LCD on the back makes picture reviewing really easy, and the ability to zoom in on and around on the pictures you have taken is fantastic.

      One of the best features of the X50 is the unique zoom lens - you can hear it zooming, but unlike other cameras there are no external moving parts! The lens is constructed to extend telescopically inside the camera body - so no protrusions!

      The camera came with an SD card (16mb) but you'll probably want to invest in additional cards with larger capacity. I only managed to get about 10 pictures of good quality on my card if I remember right, I only use 256mb cards now.

      Tech Specs:
      Number of effective pixels: 5.0 million
      CCD: 1/2.5-type interline primary-colour CCD with a total of 5.4 million pixels
      Zoom : 2.8 x optical 4.3 x digital (12x altogether)
      Aspect ratio: 4:3
      Autoflash/ autoflash with red eye/ fill in flash/no flash
      Flash recycling time: approx 6 seconds
      Shutter: CCD electronic shutter plus mechanical shutter with shutter speeds of 4 seconds up to 1/1000 of a second.
      Focal length 6.1 - 17.1 mm (35mm equivalent: 37 - 105mm)
      Maximum aperture f/2.8 - f/5.0
      Optical real-image zoom viewfinder with 2" TFT digital interface monitor
      Recording media: SD Memory cards & Multi Media Cards
      File formats JPEG, motion Jpeg (mov) WAV, DCF 1.0 DPOF and Exif 2.2 compliant
      Pictbridge enabled
      Drive modes: single/ continuous advance/ UHS continuous advance (11 off 1280 x 960 images in one second)/ self timer and multi frame (9 different pics on one photo with one press of the shutter release)
      NP700 Lithium Ion rechargeable battery
      Tripod socket, speaker, microphone, USB port/ AV out terminal

      I'm not going to go any more technical than that as i'm already out of my depth!

      What I do know though is:

      The camera can record voices, videos (night or day mode) and photographs. Night videos tend to be a bit grainy and on the red side in my experience, but i'm not sure about the quality produced from other cameras under the same conditions.

      Automatic digital subject programme selection of portrait, landscape, sports action, sunset, text and macro, makes things really easy and the slider button is on the top of the camera next to the shutter release.

      When I'm showing off, I always opt to demonstrate the macro function - it is just soooo impressive on this camera, comments tend to marvel at the quality of the image compared to the size of the camera - mind you it does help that there is a camera shake warning symbol to show when your image may be blurred so you can retake it again.

      Buttons on the camera are well placed with the shutter sliding open to power it up, so you are unlikely to switch it on in your bag/pocket without knowing.

      A four way button on the back allows you to scoot backwards and forwards between stored images. to adjust the drive mode and flash, to delete images and to rotate stored images. Also on the back are the menu button, the playback button (which can also power the camera up to view stored images without exposing the shutter) and the display button.


      The most amazing thing about this camera is the speed at which it is ready to photograph from first powering it up - I'd compare it with driving at 0-60 mph in 3 seconds (but not in my Rover 75!)

      Battery life is pretty good too, not sure how many actual shots i've taken from one charge, but on holiday for a fortnight taking video and photographs I only had to charge the battery twice during the fortnight. The battery is taken out of the camera to charge it, although a DC 4.7V adapter can be purchased separately to run from the mains.

      When the camera is in playback mode you can delete selected or all images and you can opt to have stored images copied and saved as tiny files ready to email - great timesaving idea.

      Colours are true and playback images can be displayed as slideshows, ideally suited for displaying on a tv screen or monitor.

      The only things I find annoying about the camera are:

      Red eye on some flash photographs, even with the 'red eye flash' option selected. This is more pronounced on the X50 than it was on the X20 version due to the location of the flash compared to the lens. They should have left that bit alone, but then you live and learn eh?

      The wide angle is not as wide angled as I'd like it to be, but then I can't blame the camera for that can I.

      There is a battery strength indicator which I usually fail to take notice of, so when the battery is worn out, it just expires - that may be a personnel management problem though, not the camera's fault either.

      Because of the red eye I can only rate this camera as good, but it doesn't change how much I love it.

      MyX50 was delivered to me at my work where everyone was interested in my new toy; and lo and behold, before the day was out two further cameras were ordered by colleagues.

      Although we are two years down the line, I still love my camera and everywhere that I go, my camera comes too, which has enabled me to take some excellent impromptu shots;

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      • More +
        04.07.2005 12:33
        2 Comments

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        Easy to use point and shoot digital camera

        Not much bigger than a pack of cards, and not much heavier, this ultra-compact five megapixel the KonicaMinolta Dimage X50 camera is a winner in my book.

        I didn’t need the manual to set the time and date and to view and delete my first few test shots. Playback and menu controls are to the right of the viewfinder on the back and it’s obvious what most buttons do. A USB cable is included so you can view your photos on your PC, though I prefer an SD card reader.

        The X50 turns on via a slider at the front, which means it’s difficult to switch it on accidentally. The two-inch display screen makes it easy to see your picture, though it is perhaps not as sharp as on some cameras. Novices will appreciate the little brackets on screen that frame the centre of your shot (pros: you can turn this off via a button on the back).

        The Dimage X50 has automatic flash and red-eye reduction and three shooting modes – simple, video (with sound and output in PAL or NTSC) and automatic digital subject selection: this chooses from cloudy, sports, landscape or sunset. You can also record audio notes with photos.

        The internal zoom makes a change – when you press the zoom control buttons on the top right, you hear a sound but unless you look at the viewfinder you won’t realise that you’ve zoomed in or out. The 2.8x optical zoom is where you make the trade-off for the X50’s compact size - it’s a bit on the low side, in my opinion, but acceptable in view of the other features you’re getting.

        With this camera, there’s virtually no shutter lag - that’s the time the camera takes to be ready between shots or after the screen powers down. It was ready to go again almost instantly after shooting and immediately after powering up.

        I’ve been using it for just over a week and it’s coped well with pictures taken indoors and out, in daylight and at night, in motion and still. While the professional snapper is bound to have a few gripes, the average user will find the Dimage X50 a good point and shoot digital camera.

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        • More +
          04.07.2005 12:23
          3 Comments

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          Great point and shoot for novice users

          The KonicaMinolta Dimage X50 felt deliciously small after my chunky old Nikon 775. Not much bigger than a pack of cards, and not much heavier, this ultra-compact five megapixel camera is already a winner in my book.

          Setup was easy. I didn’t need the manual to get time, date and other settings fixed and to view and delete my first few test shots. Playback and menu controls are to the right of the viewfinder on the back and it’s obvious what most buttons do. And if, like me, you’ve got an SD card reader, you’ll never need to use the included USB cable to view your photos on your PC.

          The X50 turns on via a slider at the front, which means it’s difficult to switch it on accidentally. A cute (or annoying) little tune plays and it’s ready to rock. The two-inch display screen is perhaps not as sharp as on some cameras, but its size makes it easy to see your picture. Novices will appreciate the little brackets on screen that frame the centre of your shot (pros: you can turn this off via a button on the back).

          Like most cameras, the Dimage X50 has automatic flash and red-eye reduction. It also has three shooting modes – simple, video (with sound and output in PAL or NTSC) and automatic digital subject selection: this chooses from cloudy, sports, landscape or sunset. You can also record audio notes with photos.

          The internal zoom takes some getting used to – when you press the zoom control buttons on the top right, you hear a sound but unless you look at the viewfinder you won’t realise that you’ve zoomed in or out. The 2.8x optical zoom is where the X50’s compact size requires some sacrifice – it’s a bit on the low side, in my opinion, but adequate in view of the other features you’re getting.

          When doing the research before buying this camera, I learned a new term, ‘shutter lag’ – that’s the time the camera takes to be ready between shots or after the screen powers down. It’s not something you think about much, except when you miss a vital shot. With this camera, there’s virtually none. It was ready to go again almost instantly after shooting and immediately after powering up.

          I’ve been using it for just over a week and it’s coped well with pictures taken indoors and out, in daylight and at night, in motion and still. Sure, the professional snapper is bound to find something to complain about, but for the average point and shoot user like me, the Dimage X50 is more than adequate.

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        • Product Details

          The Konica Minolta DiMAGE X50 is handy enough to take anywhere and stylish enough to show everyone. Add the fastest-in-class startup time, 2.8X non-protruding optical zoom, 5-megapixel CCD, and large 2-inch LCD, and you've got a high quality digital camera in a sleek, compact package.

          The 5-megapixel DiMAGE X50 digital camera takes the DiMAGE X series' concept of "thin, fast and stylish" and adds even more speed.

          With its non-protruding zooms lens, the DiMAGE X50 fits neatly in a breast pocket and is ready when you are-thanks to the approx. 0.5-second startup time - to take those spur-of-the-moment shots and ensure that you never miss a photo opportunity. Automatic Digital Subject Program Selection automatically selects the optimum shooting mode for the subject at hand, allowing you to take beautiful photos that match the needs of the particular scene. In short, the DiMAGE X50 makes it fast and easy for anyone to take beautiful, high-quality pictures anytime.

          The DiMAGE X50's 5-megapixel CCD and proprietary CxProcess II image processing technology combine to give superb quality images - pictures that reproduce the natural colors as faithfully as you see them with your own eyes. The zoom range gives everything from wide-angle shots to close-ups that are clearly focused as near as 10 cm from the subject, without the need to switch to macro mode. If you need to get even closer, the Super Macro mode based on Konica Minolta's newly developed optics system gives amazing close-ups as near as 6 cm.

          The DiMAGE X50 has a large 2-inch LCD screen whose easy-to-view menus equal greater ease of operation. And the slide cover protects the lens, so there's no need to worry about putting the camera inside a pocket or purse.