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Brilliant, reliable camera which can be found at good prices. Easy to hand hold. Fairly lightweight, with great features and an excellent image quality. Not quite a pro camera, but certainly a high-end consumer item.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    21 Reviews
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      26.01.2014 23:50
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      An excellent camera; if you're prepared to put the time in.

      I bought this camera over a year ago now, it has not once failed me. I bought the camera along with two lenses and some minor accessories. I bought a zoom lens and one for close-up shots; thus far, this is all I have needed. The camera body itself is very well made, and Nikon provide the sufficient caps to protect the body of the camera when it is not being used. However, no carry case is provided which is something that is fundamental to protect the camera. The functionality of the camera is easy to use, but I would recommend spending some time reading through the manual and understanding the key functions of the camera, before you start taking photos. The functions that the camera offers are many and varying. I won't detail them all here but I would recommend starting on the auto function, if you're looking to take a few good quality snaps. Once you have done that for a while and understand the functions of the camera, I would recommend moving to the manual functions to adjust shutter speed and aperture size yourself. That, and increasing the size of the jpg picture quality will ensure you produce the highest possible quality pictures from your D7000. A point to consider on this: If you are buying your camera to submit photos to online photo banks, they will usually only accept high quality photos, using the standard auto features will not cut it if you are looking to make money from your photography. The body itself can hold 2 x SD cards and houses the battery. Personally, I have added an additional battery pack to the bottom of the camera. Whilst the battery life is sufficient with the standard D7000, if left off for a while it does tend to power-dump and loose all battery. It can take a few hours to charge again so it is nice to have another spare ready. The Nikon (45mm) lens that came with the camera (and is pictured) is of high quality and offers an auto or manual focus. I personally use the manual focus as I use the manual settings on the camera. The lens is a perfect first lens and is great for taking family photos, parties, outdoors etc. If you are looking for a more specialist photography, you might want to consider a macro lens or telephoto zoom lens but be warned; these can come at a price. From the offset, the quality of pictures are high. If you are considering this camera over its lower counterparts I would strongly recommend that you read through the manual or buy a book on the functionality of the D7000. I had never touched a DSLR before purchasing this and after investing a little time to learn the functions, I now can produce professional quality pictures, day and night, with ease. For night shots, one will definitly need a tripod or stand of some sort though. Overall, an excellent product and one that I highly recommend. I was a beginner when I started using it and feel that most people could start on this camera if they are prepared to invest the time to learn its functions. Additions I made that you might want to consider: 300mm/macro lens Tripod Additional SD cards Flash gun Battery pack UV lens filters/protectors DSLR Case

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      10.12.2013 18:05
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      Perfect for amateurs, semi-professionals, delivers quality & versatility without leaving you broke

      When i considered changing my Nikon 7600 for a dslr i had just one requirement, quality. This camera didn't let me down, i have a few old 35mm camera lenses and using third party adapters i'm now using them on the d7000. To show you how much fun this camera is shooting in 1080p with your super wide angle or zoom lens is just stunning, you can alter your depth of field as you shoot, giving super blurred backgrounds and pin sharp subjects up close and personal. You get the standard kit you'd expect to get with a dslr these days, battery, charger, camera body AND a fully versatile 18-105mm lens, that covers wide angle to a nice amount of zoom, perfect for squeezing in close portraits with a group of people to getting nature shots without getting close enough to scare animals away. Get yourself a nice 16 or 32gb card to go with this camera and you wont be looking back, as i said before you can use older lenses which significantly will cut down your expenses if you want an even wider angle, or more zoom, just look around and even lenses made 20, 30,40 years ago will work providing you use the right adapter, you needn't spend over £1000 on a new lens when you've got over 50 years worth of lenses you can use! Getting into the picture quality before i get too carried away with how versatile the camera is...it's stunning, sharp, beautifully saturated colors that Nikon are known for, nice details in the shadows, great high iso performance for low light shooting and of course RAW options for squeezing out as much detail as you can uncompressed for editing later on your PC, jpegs are also gorgeous straight out of the camera, the RAW option just gives a little more creative control for adjusting exposure, color balance, brightness, ect. Don't make it a big deal upgrade from a point and shoot digital to a DSLR, just get the D7000 by Nikon, you wont be sorry and you'll LOVE the results!

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        18.06.2013 13:49
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        A brilliant camera, perhaps not the best for a first timer but I'll get there!

        I love phoyography and taking pictures and have considered trying to get into it for a while. I thought it'd be a nice relaxing hobby that I could pick up with experience over time and in the mean time I could use the camera for family pictures, landscape shots, friends wedddings etc. When it came to choosing a camera, all I knew was that I wanted good image quality and a fast shutter speed to get the kids in motion. The other specs don't make a lot of sense to me unless explained. I went into PC World as they have a variety of cameras that you can hold and take shots with which gives you a feel for them. I was initially looking at Nikons but was told a Canon would be much more suited to a first time DSLR user as it is more user friendly. So I decided on the Canon 60D. I visited the shop a few more times to chat to the staff and get a feel for the camera but on my last visit there was a different member of staff who asked why I didn't get a Nikon. He explained that you get used to whatever camera you have and that the Nikon isn't much more difficult than the Canon. The Nikon offers 16.2mp which is less than the canon and doesn't offer a swivel screen which I had liked about the Canon but the dual memory card slot and slightly quicker shutter speed sold it to me along with the name that I had originally wanted to buy. The camera came with an 18-105mm zoom lens which I was excited to try out as I was told this would be the lesns I'd use most often anyway. The camera cost me £750 including the lens, battery, battery charger CD and cable for computer. It was on sale down from about £850 I think. They said the D7100 is the next one up so they're going to be selling the D7000's off (According to sale assistant in PC World). They also threw in a 4GB memory card, lens cleaning cloth and carry bag for an additional £25 which I didn't think was bad. As soon as I got the camera home she was out the box and I had her in one hand, manual in the other. I thought I would set the camera up first then read the manual but I ended up having to read the manual to see how to put the lens on! It's quite simle, there's a white dot on the lens and one on the camera body. You line them up, put the lens to the camera body and turn it anticlockwise until it clicks. I then put the memory card in the first slot which is under a plastic lid that you slide and move. The battery goes into the camera at the bottom. It's hard to open the battery compartment but I think this is good as it stops you from accidentally opening it when using the camera. When I first switched the camera on, I set the time and date and then she was ready for action. The camera itself is very nice. It's black allover with the splash of red colour on the front which is Nikon's signature. I've been told it's quite robust so won't break too easily is banged or dropped though I'm hoping not to find out! It is also weather sealed so can be used in the rain and won't get damaged but again, this is something I probably won't be putting to the test just in case! My initial thought was 'Oh my God, so many buttons' but I read through the manual and followed its instruction which helped me get to know what some of the buttons and dials were for. Everything on the camera is based on letters i.e. A for Apeture or CH for coninuously high, which I found confusing at first considering I didn't know what any of them were. I rarely read the manual for anything but I've relied on it for this camera. There are seven release modes on the camera which are found on a dial beneath the main mode-choosing dial. They are S (single frame), CL (continuous low speed), CH (continuous high speed), Q (quiet shutter-release), self timer, remote control, MUP (mirror up). I read about these and have used the single frame, CH and quiet mode but haven't had a need for the self timer or CL yet. I'm not entierly sure what the MUP is for, I know it brings the mirror up but I don't know what for and I haven't got a remote for it to use remote mode. Having all of these options means I really want to learn about which is most suitable and get to know all of the features which I've been trying to do over the last few days. I usually end up on CH mode as this offers a quick shutter speed meaning I get less of a blur on my pictures. The camera boasts 6 frames per second which is really quick. This means I can take pictures of my grandson running around or on his bike and I get clear, non-blurry pictures. I have been using the Camera on scene mode which I then set to sports or Children as they offer quick shutter speeds to capture moving subjects. Other scenes avaiable incluce portrait, close-up, night portrait, pets and landscape. I have attempted portrait mode and found that it give softer skin tones and bring out peoples eyes but I need a little practice with it. Sport mode allows me to take multiple shots of a subject in action meaning it's almost like freeze framing a video at the right moment but in great quality. The camera offers auto focus which is easy to choose on the lens and camera body by flicking the switch to A instead of M. It has a 39 point sensor which helps the camera to focus the image for you. I haven't actually used this yet. I set the Camera to M (manual) meaning you have to twist the ring on the lens to focus the image before taking the picture. I have used Manual as I want to get used to finding the focus myself rather than relying on the camera to do it. The lens that came with the camera is really good. My images have come out very clear and high quality. I normally manage to avoid getting any blurring on action shots but this depends on me rather than the camera. You zoom in by twisting the bigger ring on the lens which brings the lens out making it bigger. One of the other selling points from the Nikon was the location of the focus on the lens. On the canon, the focus ring was right at the end by the glass meaning you had to move your hand down the lens to reach the focus. It also meant your fingers ended up in the shot whilst trying to alter the focus. I guess this is something you'd get used to, but I much prefer the focus on the Nikon which is near the camera body as it allows you to change the zoom and focus one after the other without moving your hand. This is ideal if you're taking quick pictures of a moving subject and need to alter focus quickly. The camera body alone with a memory card and battery weigh 780g. The 18-105mm lens weighs 420g so when you have the two together, the camera feels really heavy. I was really concerned about dropping the camera as it is quite bulky and fairy heavy so I invested in a neck strap as I didn't get one with the camera which I was suprised about. I managed to pick up a neck strap from Jessops for £15 which has done the trick. The camera is still fairly heavy but I feel a lot more confident when using it now, especially when I'm out of the house. The camera came with an 18-105mm lens which is a standard zoom lens capable of taking portraits and zooming quite well. When you zoom in, you alter the focus and don't lose quality as you would on a point and shoot. I'm looking at getting an 18-200mm lens next as I've heard good things about it. I'd better master this lens first though! The battery that came with the camera is also great. I've charged it fully once since I had the camera and have taken 500 pictures. The battery life has barely even gone down, it's very reliable like that. I think this is ideal for more serious photographers that need a camera all day i.e. at weddings. Overall, this camera is brilliant. I'm not a photographer (Yet! Watch this space), but I've still managed to take some really lovely shots with this camera that are great quality. When I'm able to use the camera to its full potential, imagine how good the images could be then. Until then, I'm using the manual and googling any issues or problems that I have. I've only had her for five days and I've already picked up quite a lot, it's just the different functions and settings that I need to learn about. From my experience as a complete novice, I would recommend taking the plunge and getting this camera. It isn't proffessional level but I've been told by others that it has some proffessional features i.e. the dual memory card slot. It's a sturdy and lovely looking camera that produces brilliant pictures. It's pricey but so far, I think it is worth it.

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          27.04.2013 09:20
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          Mid-range digital single lens reflex (DSLR) with 'kit' 18-105 zoom lens

          There are many reasons for buying a camera, but here's an unusual one. My daughter, who was visiting me for the week over Easter tripped and fell, banging her Nikon DSLR on the ground which resulted in it only being partially operational. No, I didn't buy her a new one, before anyone asks. However, the fact that she was about to get paid for her very first wedding shoot in four days time did indeed lend a certain urgency to the solution. As she is the one to fall over with an expensive camera only in her hand, not round her neck, I didn't really feel like doing anything except passing on my Nikon D90 to her, and getting its replacement for myself. After all, she'll probably inherit the damned thing anyway! Thus I find myself the unexpected owner of a brand new Nikon D7000 with 18-105mm zoom lens, the latter being the 35mm film-camera equivalent of a 28-150mm zoom. This camera still has an APS-C sized sensor, not a full frame "35mm" job, so lenses take on different values for those of us brought up on 35mm SLRs. It helped that I had already agreed to pay my daughter a monthly instalment towards her upcoming nuptials (that's her own, not as a photographer!), so all I've really done is pay her one month less, and paid about £189 over the top for the privilege of being the owner of a new camera, albeit, one that isn't that much different to the D90. WHY NOT JUST ANOTHER D90? I was surprised to find that even the D90 is still available as 'new, but old stock', whereas the D7000 is definitely still in Nikon's catalogue despite having been sidelined by the D7100 already. It also had the advantage of figuring in their "Spring 2013 Cashback" campaign, the D7000 attracting a £100 bonus in the shape of a pre-loaded Visa Debit card. All in all that brought the net cost via Amazon.co.uk down to £689 and I get to claim a second year's warranty. A new D90 would have cost me about £529. It should be noted that, at launch, the D7000 camera body alone cost around £1000, so two years down the line, being able to buy it WITH lens for £689 has to be regarded as something of a bargain, as long as you don't mind its demise as a current model no doubt being imminent. THE DIFFERENCE IS IN THE DETAIL Compared to the D90, outwardly, there's not much to report. It's more or less the same dimensions and appearance and great for anyone trying to sneak the 'upgrade' in under their spouse's radar unless of course you have a joint credit card account. However, the D7000 benefits from a partially die-cast metal casing as opposed to being all plastic. I wouldn't swear to it, but it's a tad heavier as a result. The rear screen is about the same size and still doesn't swivel - ironically you have to opt for a cheaper Nikon to get that facility. Oddly, some of the controls that used to be 'menu driven' on the D90 are now ' twiddly knobs' in their own right and some of the 'knob-controlled' features of the D90 have been driven underground to being menu-driven on screen. I'll give you an example. On the D90, you had to scroll through an LCD menu to choose 'single shot, continuous shooting (fast and slow), timer, remote control'. On the D7000, these are in the form of a physical dial on the left, under and concentric to the main function dial. In doing so, they've added 'Quiet' to the list. This somehow slows down the mirror return which lowers the pitch from a frenetic clatter to two minor somewhat more bass-like thumps. On the other hand, the main function dial, whilst retaining the usual M, A, S, P*, Auto, Auto (No Flash) options, only has SCENE and curiously U1 and U2 as its 'artistic options'. Gone are the little images of a flower close-up or an athlete breaking out of the starting blocks to depict Macro and Action modes. Choosing SCENE now means a trip to the rear screen where a whole new (and much longer) list of scenes is available. Predictably, this includes such niceties as 'night portrait', 'night landscape', 'child' (keep still you little bu****r), and curiously, 'food'. All it needs is the addition of Optical Character Recognition for it to be able to spot words in your Alphabetti Spaghetti! After all, it can spot faces, even sideways on. (*Manual, Aperture Priority, Shutter-Priority, Programmed) U1 and U2 are an interesting new addition, although I guessed ahead what they were, thanks to my Fuji X10 having C1 and C2 options, these being for the set-up of two custom settings, for example, high film speed and incandescent light balance for candid indoor shots without flash. Thus you only have to trawl through the menus once to set these up. Having mastered the few controls that are different, it really comes down to spotting the differences in the nitty-gritty of the technical specification. Notably, there's that 'all-important' definition, i.e. how many mega-pixels it has. Compared to the D90's 12+, this one weighs in at 16+ and frankly I'm glad they didn't try to cram more into the APS-C sensor, as smaller pixels mean less light sensitivity. To cope with the new-found file sizes generated, the D7000 now carries slots for two SD cards, not one. These can be configured in several ways. 1. Use Card 2 merely as an overflow to Card 1. 2. Shoot video to card 2, pictures to Card 1. 3. Shoot RAW full definition shots to card 1, which their equivalent JPEG shot to Card 2. 4. Or just simply, only insert one card at a time, giving someone else the job of running off a few thumbprint images on a PC, which could prove very useful at weddings (I hope my daughter's taking notes) My own preference is '3.' Despite the extra (and smaller) mega-pixels, the D7000 is actually better at shooting in low light thanks to some new skulduggery at the processor end, and film speeds hitherto fraught with 'noise' are now main stream options, more or less obviating the need for flash in many more situations than you'd have first thought feasible without a tripod. Film speed range now goes from ISO 100 up to ISO 6400 in the normal range, and for those special 'black cat in coal mine' moments, can even be pushed to ISO 25600 although the latter would most definitely be 'noisy'. The shutter speed range goes from 30 seconds to 1/8000th of a second. The maximum aperture sizes are dictated by the lens fitted, and the 'kit lens' supplied to me has a variable maximum depending on zoom range from f3.5 to f5.6. Not earth-shatteringly large but you come to expect this with zooms. My old Nikon F's f1.4 Nikkor lens (yes it still fits) gives the impression that the sun just went super-nova through the viewfinder if the extra brightness is anything to go by. Nikon, obviously would like you to think that only their lenses are suitable, making a big play of the fact that they must be 'CPU lenses' to be fully functional, although other non-CPU lenses (like my f1.4 Nikkor) work after a fashion. Luckily, the top independent makers like Tamron know how to make CPU-type lenses for Nikon, so you're not stuck with only one brand, not that there's anything wrong with Nikon's own lenses, far from it. Nikon's current range of lenses all have 'VR', Vibration Reduction, supposedly allowing hand-held shots at rather lower shutter speeds than were previously advisable, but then so do the Tamron offerings. Ironically, it was the pocket camera and the camcorder that first started to sport this facility. The big development carried over from the D90 was the 'LiveView screen', i.e. the ability to operate the camera like a damned-great pocket job, using the rear screen as the viewfinder. LiveView raises the mirror for the duration so you can 'see' what the sensor is seeing. In my experience, this slows things down somewhat as the auto-focus now tries to find faces, and delays firing of the camera. To my mind you buy a DSLR so you can look through the optical viewfinder at a crystal-clear view, not to hold a large camera myopically at arm's length. However, one instance where you MUST use LiveView is when shooting video, after all you can't expect the camera to shoot 30 frames per second with the mirror rattling like a Gatling gun (rattling, Gatling, see what I did there?). The D90 could do this too, but only at 720p definition, not the 'full HD' definition of the D7000's 1080p. You can view these straight to TV via the mini-HDMI port or transfer the video files to a PC for processing and turning into DVDs, what-have-you, and thanks to the twin SD card facility, you could even shoot them to Card 2, remove it and read movie files on a PC without preventing normal picture-taking. Another notable addition, buried deep within the confines of the set-up menu, is the ability to action a timed sequence of shots, making time-lapse photography a built-in possibility. Great for standing at North Cape in summer and tracking the 'midnight sun' - just don't forget to bring a tripod! Internal dust has always been a threat to cameras with interchangeable lenses, DSLRs more so than film SLRS, as the latter tended to be only affected for a frame or so before the film advance mechanism dislodged any detritus. With a DSLR, the dust on the sensor is there till you shift it, able to affect a whole raft of photos. If you discover this too late, you can take a 'dust reference shot' against a white background, which makes processing the affected photos a lot easier. I haven't tried it as I believe it needs a full-blown version of Photoshop and photos shot purely in their RAW format. Better still is to avoid changing lenses in the middle of deserts or on a tour of a cement works, and to use the vibrating sensor-cleaner which shifts dust to where it can be removed without the risk of a catastrophic finger print on the sensor itself. PICTURE IT To a certain extent, picture quality is more about the lens than the camera body, and as this uses the self-same lens as did the D90, the differences would be difficult to spot, except that its low-light abilities are somewhat enhanced by comparison. I've yet to find one shot where using a flash was absolutely necessary, except as 'fill-in' on a sunny day (a what, Chris?). CONCLUSION Not one for the faint-hearted, faint-walleted or indeed weak-necked. However, there's no need to be put off by the alarming array of menu options. You can still turn out superb pictures just by sticking to the programme mode until conditions dictate otherwise. Whether you'd want to carry the 300+ page manual with you is another matter! My experience of the official Nikon offerings is that they are adequate at telling you how to change options, but lousy at telling you WHY you'd want to. I'd buy an independent field guide if I were you. Whilst not quite a 'pro' camera, after all, real pros buy DSLRs with a full-sized sensor, i.e. the same size as a 35mm film negative, it does share the same excellent range of lenses, some of the build quality and probably 90% of the tweaks and wizz-bangs of the upper echelons of the Nikon range. The ability to back up to a second SD card takes it that bit closer, and I'm sure my daughter has her eyes on it for her wedding photography venture. She'll have to wait till the next time she trips over carrying the D90 at the very soonest!

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            24.09.2012 12:56
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            Excellent, _Almost_ pro level camera

            The D7000 is an excellent camera, ideal for those bordering on professional level photography who cannot quite justify paying for the totally-professional digital camera system. It will take anyone a good amount of time to fully explore what the D7000 can do and after some getting used to the camera will give you excellent results. While more megapixels does NOT equal better, the D7000's 16.2 MP will be more than you need for just about anything. The design of the camera controls, both on the body and the menu system make the camera very flexible. The 2 SD card slots are particularly useful, especially where you can save 2 different types of files (with different resolutions). The Body is sturdy without being uncomfortably heavy (unlike some of the Nikon pro models). While I recommend buying a spare battery, it is exceedingly unlikely you will use up a battery charge in a single day of photography unless you use the screen constantly. The D7000 has a DX sensor (Nikon-speak for their sensor smaller than a 35mm film frame) which means that if you by the DX lenses for it they will not work very well with 35mm film or FX (ie full frame sensor) cameras. I have bought 3 DX lenses and am happy with the results, but if you are thinking of upgrading to a full frame sensor, or want compatibility with film cameras, spend the extra money for the FX lenses. If you are thinking about buying the D7000 as your first 'proper' camera, it does have 2 automatic modes (with and without flash) which does a perfectly adequate job for the kind of photos you would take with a compact digital camera. I would say that the D7000 would not be a bad camera to learn photography, but if you do this buy a 'how to' type book for the D7000, and go on a photography course as the user manual will not get you to the point where you can get the kind of results you will be happy with. If you are used to film SLRs you need to spend some time getting used to the D7000s differences when it comes to dynamic range (ie it's ability to capture low vs. Bright light in the same photo) I have found it to be quite a bit lower than film but not to the point where it matters for the vast majority of photos. It is also a good idea to find one of the online lists of things to do before taking your camera out for the first time (ie don't let the camera take photos without any cards in the camera to save them!) So: overall, an excellent camera, but one that takes investment in how to get the most out of.

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            18.06.2012 16:22
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            amazing camera, easy to use and worth the money!!!

            FANTASTIC CAMERA. if you are familiar with cameras you will notice this is very much like the D90 camera, but it's obviously larger. Don't let it fool you though, it is not the same. This has an upgraded sensor that offers the user 16MP image shooting capability, whereas the D90 used a 12.3MP sensor. The battery lasts longer than other older models which means more time for more shooting! the buttons are quite large and, well chuncky, which means they won't break easy, they can handle some abuse, but don't go around throwing your camera about! When you hold the camera you feel very confident as if you are actually a professional photographer, although some people may be put off by the size, but don't let that scare you, its pips to use! There are two 'jog dials' one at the front and one at the rear. The rear one flows smoothly, while the one at the front is a little harder to use, which is how it is meant to be. This camera takes perfect clear images, even in low light conditions, which look even better when uploaded onto a computer. It may look big and scary, but it is so simple to use once you know how. It takes amazing videos too! I could go on for hours about how great this camera is! This is the best camera I have ever had, and would not be without it :) i always take my camera everywhere i go, just because i love taking pictures, but the only problem is it is a hassle to carry about, so i sometimes take my old small camera with me, depending on where i am going :) hope this helps, definitely recommend buying this!

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            06.01.2012 14:02

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            I have had my D7000 for a good few months now as I have got into wildlife photography, The results are a massive step up to the cameras I used to own, the detailling in the shots are amazing even when cropped down considerably. I definetely recommend this, I mainly use mine with a 500mm lense and have had no problems at all. A must have and is an essential part of my kit....highly recomended.

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            02.12.2011 13:19

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            Just love love love this camera, you will not be disappointed

            Having always used Nikon cameras and in recent years we have had the Nixon D40 we decided to treat our daughter to the Nikon D7000 complete bundle for her birthday and boy what a camera! It has every function that you need and more. The camera feels subtle but not too heavy and is easy to grasp the buttons (basically point and shoot for fantastic results). I am certainly no expert with a camera but some of my photographs taken with this camera have recently been used in magazine articles (we have horses and have been good enough quality for the magazines). Even though the functions and easy to use, it does not detract from the quality. We did review other makes and models before buying this camera, but to be honest nothing even came close to it. It is quite expensive but at the moment it is on offer in Currys for £1,039.99 beating competitors by at least £100.

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            23.08.2011 14:35
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            If your looking for a high end consumer/low pro camera this is the one! Dont forget a good lens!

            Really really nice camera and a bargain at the price. In many ways its more sophisticated than some of the pro range cameras. I used the D90 for 12 months before upgrading to this and I love it! I bought a third party battery grip and hand strap to go with it and its worked wonders in steadying my hand. I can see this lasting me along time in terms of functionality and I trust Nikons in terms of build quality. I was torn between the pro D300 and the consumer D7000 and It made the most sense to buy this. Had I done more sport or wildlife burst shooting then maybe the D300 would have pipped it. But all in all including the price the D7000 came out top and I cant see anyone regretting the purchase. This certainly raises the bar for its competitors. Coupled with some nice primes lenses I am getting beautiful images and the low light capability is awesome. I was dangling out of my window at the top of the tower block taking pictures of the Riots in salford at midnight,hand held with no discernible noise. Ok, the video capability. While probably the best of the current offerings on SLR if your buying the camera to use as a functional video camera you will be disappointed. You can get some great shots in the studio manually focusing while making pretentious black and white art shorts edited from clips making use of your cool lenses, however the autofocus will not allow you to walk around and film your childs birthday party. Video on Slr's remains a cool extra rather than a reason to buy one.

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            02.06.2011 15:01

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            A well specified camera for the serious hobbyist.... go get one!

            Having drowned and effectivly killed of my two and half year old Nikon D90 I decided to upgrade to the Nikon D7000. The D7000 is a lil bigger than the D90 and i find it easier to hand hold. I much prefer the button layout compared to my D90 and the additional extra external control is welcome. The grip has a nicer rubber finish found on the more expensive Nikon DSLR cameras and does feel better in the hand. I have now owned the Nikon D7000 for six weeks and it has been a joy to use. Initially it took a week to get used to the way it exposes but after running the camera through its paces under various lighting conditions I am now able to get well exposed pics using the different metering options. Auto focus is spot on and fast and I had no problems when used with my nikon 16-85, 70-300VR and 50mm 1.8. The detail is fantastic and if like me you like to crop a lot you will be extremely happy. Compared to the 12mp sensor in the D90, the new 16mp sensor in the D7000 is just so much more versatile with the option to crop more as well as better high ISO performance. I would recommend this camera to someone who has some basic photography experience and will make use of the many features it has over the D5100. The HD video is a handy feature to have though i have not used it much myself. Battery life so far is at 1500 shots between charges. However this does include using the Live view mode which eats up battery life as well as a lot of reviewing of pics. The battery itself is a new design which is unfortunate as I was hoping I could use my 2 D90 batteries. As with everything there is a learning curve with this camera as Nikon have used a new sensor and auto focus system. However once you master it you will be blown away by the results you can achieve.

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            25.04.2011 12:41
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            Must buy if you're a professional . Not that useful when it comes to day-to-day activities

            My 1st Digital SLR was a D80 I purchased some time ago. The shutter went down a couple weeks back. Nevertheless I was about to upgrade to the D7000 anyways so this simply hurried things up. I purchased the D7000 kit along with the 18-105 lenses .However I sold them on EBay after sometime. I had been capturing pics using a Tamron 17-50 2.8 lens on the D80. For poor light, this did wonders but more than 50 % of time I required one of my SB-600 flash. The only disadvantage in the Tamron, or mixture of the Tamron with the D80, was that the pictures were rather soft. Therefore I also upgraded my lens to the Nikon 16-85. Even though this is an adjustable lens that maxes out at 3.5, it's astonishingly sharp with the D7000. Additionally, the extra reach is ideal for obtaining superior pictures as well as providing comparatively shallow depth of field that normally could be lost with the sluggish aperture. The main reason I spoke about the lens change is that I would not have gone to an adjustable lens had it not been for the incredible ISO efficiency on the D7000. I'm now capturing at extremely fast shutter speeds. I am witnessing remarkable outcomes at 800 ISO even if completely inflated (1:1). At ISO 1600, I noticed insignificant noise but Lightroom 3's noise elimination effortlessly removes it. 3200 definitely isn't noiseless but Lightroom can fix it up perfectly in many scenarios. My outdated D80 had way more noise at 400 compared to D7000 has got at 1600; I would point out 800 on it was comparable to 3200 on the D7000. I saw printing 1600 pictures at lesser dimensions with no need for software clean-up. I'm amazed at the ISO abilities of this digital camera. I am glad I can obtain excellent dx lenses for less than £425 instead of £910 for fx. Ideal for fanatics like me! If you capture HDR/Bracket pictures in speedy succession, the 6FPS shutter speed will work to your advantage. Having this type of quick shutter makes it possible for you to achieve this. This is only feasible due to the high ISO features allowing fast shutter times. I have only played with the video functionality but that's part of my interest since I detest keeping 2 digital cameras, in addition chargers and media, on family holidays. The checks I did in 1080P happen to be spectacular. Auto-focusing while movie recording is fine, given that the backdrop is not too loud. The greatest drawback I've experienced will be the built-in microphone accumulates plenty of auto focusing noise. I haven't yet purchased an external mic but possibly I may have to. Overall I'm extremely pleased using the D7000 and observe zero major weak points. It isn't low-cost; however, it is worth the money.

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              17.03.2011 16:45
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              The ideal camera for the avid photographer

              As an enthusiastic photographer, the Nikon D7000 makes the ideal camera. It is fairly light weight, easy to use, has some great features and most importantly the image quality is excellent. Even if you are new with photography, the manual covers everything you need to know and is quite useful. It is a little pricey, but it is worth it if you are seeking a really good SLR. It's a true investment piece. I wouldn't recommend it for the casual photographer...but if you are serious about photography it is definitely one to purchase! The photographs really do speak for themselves. From my experience it takes beautiful shots of scenery in particular... it is definitely one to take on those trips to beautiful places abroad! I will be buying another Nikon again in the future when this one has run its course... but let's hope that's not for a good few years at least!

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                13.02.2011 01:07

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                Nikon D7000 has many nice aspects that will make you very happy

                The moment I heard the release of this camera, I was very happy and quickly began a think about its purchase. It took almost 3 months for me to finally go out and purchase the camera and I must admit it was worth the wait. I was very pleased that D7000 did not use up the battery like the 200. I bought a spare battery and MBD11 multi-energy battery and got about 3,000 images from the first battery. This is more than double what I would have gotten from the D200 and BP that followed. The outside of the camera has an innovative design and the casing is made of magnesium alloy the device ensures that no moisture or dust can damage the internal components of the device. At the same time, the body weight of the digital camera which is perfect for every traveler Although the unit is incredibly strong shooting and offers a very fast shutter speed to capture those moments of perfection quickly. The D7000 incorporates the feature of video editing which gives you the freedom to choose the images of the start and end points. You can change the selected images to capture shots without having to rely on the computer. You can also edit and share movies very quickly. Nikon has developed a SB-700 unit can be used easily with a set of functions that are integrated. It has the advantages of light on the internal flash of the camera. This allows complete control over the lighting of the object or scene to develop images that are professional looking and also produce spectacular results. A camera ready to go wherever your photography or cinematography takes you. Experience mind blowing images with sharp resolution and smooth tonal gradation, thanks to the 16 megapixel DX-format CMOS image sensor and a powerful EXPEED 2 image processing engine. Overall, This camera would be a great buy for anyone serious about photography. The camera is so good it could be used for professional work without a doubt.

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                05.02.2011 16:43
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                I think that Nikon made a great camera for the right price.

                Those who wanted more and better in terms of technology are already impatient waiting for successor to the Nikon D90.By presenting Nikon D7000 their waiting came to an end. Nikon D7000 is not only improved D90 but they added a couple of news which Nikon brand brings closer to the competition. Nikon D7000 exterior did not experience major changes compared to its predecessor D90. The dimensions are almost identical (132 x 105 x 107), D7000 is 2mm higher. Sensible difference in body weight with battery (780g.) so the D7000 for 77g, or 10% heavier.The casing is made of magnesium alloy and partly of polycarbonate. The screen size is 3''with 921 000 pixels.It offers good visibility in LiveView-motives as well as when viewing photos or other information. Today is no longer we discuss a lot about image quality with a DSLR. We have excellent support available for proper exposure and exposure correction, while at the same time the camera saves a bunch of data in a file that demanding photographers can later be processed by computer.The picture quality (up to ISO 1600)

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                  20.01.2011 16:59
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                  A great product that will help me pass my course but is also great for recreational use!

                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Nikon D7000 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I study Photography A-level at my local college and was always felt like my previous camera was holding me back. The Nikon D7000 is perfect for my course. The price isn't as cheap as you might expect for a camera of this size but if it helps me to pass my course then it will pay for itself a thousand times over. The box comes with many extras including the batteries, charger and a manual the size of a novel that covers everything you'll need to know. My advice is to purchase yourself a lens and buy them as a package. This way you'll save money. I made the mistake of buying them separately and this did not come cheap. The first thing I noticed was that this camera was much more impressive than anything I had previously owned. At 16 megapixels it gives the impression of HD and captures every line, feature and pore in a human face. The 3" display screen could have been bigger but this doesn't bother me too much. With the use of settings you can alter pictures and I love the fact that you can remove red-eye before you even upload the pictures to your computer. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Price ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ At £1111.99 this is a bit more expensive that I'm used to but when you snap your first picture you'll see where that extra buck went. You should be able to find this in all your local high street stores. I got mine from a store called Snaps on the my High Street.

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