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Olympus Camedia C-150

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7 Reviews

Olympus CAMEDIA C-150 - Digital camera - 2.0 Mpix - supported memory: xD-Picture Card

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      25.06.2010 18:04
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      Not the camera for your once-in-a-lifetime holiday, but a reasonable choice as a cheap backup

      Ah, now this takes me back. The first person in my family to get a digital camera that was really much more than a toy was my dad, quite a few years ago now, and the camera he got was one of these things. He didn't have much choice in the matter, as it was an unexpected gift, but he could have done an awful lot worse, and even though the C-150 came out back in 2003 it is still good enough to sell fairly steadily on eBay, not least because its lack of moving parts to get broken means that it remains quite a popular choice as a camera for the car glovebox or to give to a child as a first "proper" camera. (Not a very young child, though, as I'll explain later.)

      The C-150 - which you might also find branded as the D-390; the two models seem to be absolutely identical but for the name - was quite a sales success for Olympus. The camera may only have a by-modern-standards paltry two megapixel resolution, and its output wasn't the best, but for budget-conscious photographers who simply wanted something simple and dependable that would serve for holiday snapshots and the like it was good enough. The maker's name can't have harmed that; although some of their more recent digital compacts have been very disappointing, back then Olympus was seen as being quite a prestigious brand.

      This is one of the many cameras Olympus made that incorporated the clever sliding lens cover cum power switch. Slide the cover open and the camera powers up; slide it back and it turns off. On cameras with an optical zoom lens, this design has the drawback of requiring the user to knock the side of the lens with the edge of the cover, not always the best idea, but the C-150 is a fixed-lens camera (38mm equivalent focal length, so not that wide-angle, but a decently fast f/2.8) and so the design works brilliantly. Eventually the cover starts to click into position a little less definitely, but I haven't found myself turning the camera on or off by accident. It helps that build quality is pretty decent, and this camera does feel quite robust, though I wouldn't want to drop it onto a hard surface from more than a very modest height.

      This is not the camera for you if you love to fiddle with vast numbers of buttons. There is precisely one - the shutter - on top of the camera, and apart from the usual four-way pad there are only two others on the back. I don't have any problem with that, though; for people perhaps nervous about shifting to digital photography, which at the time was only slowly shedding its geeky computer-nerd image, a clean and simple interface was the best choice for Olympus to make. They didn't necessarily get it all right (as I'll touch on in a minute) but I've no quibble with the button layout, and though they're a bit small considering the camera's relatively bulky design, I do like their soft-touch feel.

      Considering its age, the C-150's LCD screen is really quite good. You shouldn't expect miracles, in that it's not quite as bright as you'd expect on a modern model, but its 1.8-inch size does make a small but significant difference compared with the 1.5-inch screens that were still pretty much standard at the time. You get a simple optical viewfinder as well, which seems to be not much more than a plastic tunnel (think a modern disposable camera) but is not as tiny as tends to be the case on the ever-shrinking minority of modern digicams that still offer this option at all. It's not as accurate as using the LCD, but it'll do if you're not aiming for perfection.

      Taking snapshot photos is very easy with this camera; if you're happy with the default settings then it really is a case of turning it on (by sliding back the lens cover, remember), aiming and pressing the shutter. This is an autofocus camera, so there is a very noticeable lag, nearly a second in fact, between pushing the button and the shot actually being taken; reviews from the time tend to think that that delay is reasonable, but things have moved on since then and I reckon that many people will now find it a little irritating. I know I do! As you would expect, half-pressing the shutter to pre-focus brings a dramatic improvement, though there is still a short lag.

      One area where the C-150 doesn't quite measure up is in its menu system. Icons are shown in a frankly eye-watering bright green and yellow, and some of them are a little less than obvious in their meaning. The paths to a few of the options are not entirely intuitive either: for example, exposure compensation is under the "Camera" menu, but white balance is under "Picture". Why, I cannot say. Unless you've used an Olympus digicam before, you will probably either have to refer to the manual (if you have it), or at least fiddle around for a bit, before using any of the more advanced options. However, for the most basic of uses, with everything on auto, that still shouldn't be needed.

      In spite of the fact that you don't get many controls to play with - ISO, in particular, is auto only - there are one or two interesting settings available to you. Rather surprisingly on such a simple camera, one of these is spot metering, which calculates exposure from the centre of the frame only, rather than (as is the default) having regard to the whole image. This is very useful when taking photos of things like buildings that would otherwise be silhouetted against the sun. You also get a very limited selection of scene modes (just four of them) of which Landscape is perhaps the most useful.

      Like all Olympus compacts of this vintage, the C-150 uses xD memory cards. These are absolutely tiny - which is the reason I wouldn't recommend this camera for a very young child - and can be a bit fiddly to handle, but you get used to it quickly enough. Note that this camera cannot use the newer "M" or "H" branded xD cards; to be on the safe side, I'd recommend not going above 256 MB, which for a 2mp camera is likely to be ample anyway. Power is provided by two A A batteries, which last an acceptable if not vast amount of time. NiMH rechargeables are best if you take the C-150 out regularly, but for occasional use (eg as a glovebox camera) a couple of Duracells will probably be okay. Flash photos absolutely eat the batteries, though, so beware!

      Oh yes, photo quality; thought I'd forgotten about that, didn't you? The news here is decidedly mixed, so let's start with the biggest problem, which is colour. For some reason this camera boosts the red saturation to a considerable degree, and that means that things like (pink) skin tones are given a very bright, almost garish appearance. Yes, a lot of people like what the manufacturers tend to call "punchy" colours, but Olympus really did go too a little bit far with this one. There's no "low saturation" option on the camera, so you may need to be prepared to do some work on your computer if you prefer your colours more muted. Bright blues - sunny seas, for example - show a similar problem, if not quite so obvious a one.

      If you can accept, look past or fix the problematic colours, pretty much everything else is acceptable at least. You wouldn't expect amazing resolution from a 2mp camera, and you don't get it, but it's probably towards the better end of its class in this regard. Exposure is generally all right, too; the C-150 does have some problems with very bright and contrasty scenes, but then so do most compact cameras, including those much more highly specified than this one. It's not entirely reliable with flash photos, though, just occasionally (and infuriatingly, not predictably) underexposing pictures to a frankly unacceptable degree. A shame, considering that the anti-red-eye setting works quite well.

      This is an easy camera to get hold of, and as usual with this type of digicam eBay is the place to look. There will usually be at least half a dozen listings active at any one time, and with a modicum of patience a basic setup (camera and 16 MB xD card) can be obtained for around £10 all-in. For some reason the D-390 version tends to go for more; whether the higher number leads people to think, incorrectly, that it's a more advanced model I don't know. Without the colour and flash problems, this might have scraped into the four-star bracket. It's easy and enjoyable to use, as well as reliable, and that combination means that it still warrants a three-star rating.

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      • More +
        16.03.2006 01:08
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        NON

        WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        When chooseing a digital camera there are lots of choices you will have to make and just like all technologe things change so often that one minute you will think you got a really good deal or the best camera around and the next you will think other wise but we all have to make choices and in the pertect world we could have a test run on them before we buy,but we dont so we have to choose as wisely as we can.
        One of the things to look out for in digital cameras is there zoom capabilety ,the older optical camera's had just one one type of zoom but in digital cameras there are two types optical and digital,only look at the optical zoom when looking at the specifications, I say this because digital zoom is very low quality and reduces the size of the picture your takeing and this can be done very simpley in a basic paint program.
        There are so many camera's available its crazy from 1 MILLION MEGA Pixel's to a 21.8 MILLION MEGA pixel, it really is crazy but in the end its all a case of money and what do you really want the camera for,of course nights and day's out with the family dont really need anymore than 2 MILLION MEGA pixel's for a good picture ,but again this all depend's on how big your print's are going to be printed at the bigger the picture the more pixels you will need to keep the picture clear and crisp,
        Another thing to look out for is,does the camera has a memmory card and if so is it a recognised format and how big is it,the bigger the card the more pictures you can take.


        WHY I MADE MY CHOICE
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        When it was my time to pick a camera I did'nt have the internet to look around at different makes and models at the time so I could'nt really see what the main differences were at the time from one to another, so at the time my choice was a bit of a hit or miss.
        I picked an OLYMPUS camera from the CAMEDIA range,this seemed like a good all in one choice for a first digital camera,as it had a flash plus 2 MEGA pixel's an XD memmory card as well as haveing all the software for uploading an downloading pictures with out haveing to go to the shop and getting the needed cables,at the time of purchase I did buy a memmory card reader tho as I was told downloading the pictures straight from the camera runs the batterys out very fast and I soon found this out a number of times,the resolution on the phone were also one of the reasons I chose this camera from the othere's these ranged from 640x480 to 1600x1200 with different image qualitys available for you to choose from.

        SPEC'S OF THE CAMERA
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        2.0 million pixels for image processing
        Bright F2.8 5 mm Olympus lens
        (equivalent to 38 mm on a 35 mm
        camera) plus 2,5x digital zoom
        TTL autofocus plus centre-weighted and
        spot light metering
        Easy operation thanks to full
        auto program and four scene programs
        Multi-language menu
        Large 1.8 inch LCD monitor
        Quick Time Motion JPEG for
        movie recording
        Accepts the ultra-compact
        xD-Picture Card
        USB AutoConnect and video out
        weight = 215 grams
        WHAT IT FELT LIKE AFTER PURCHASE
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        At first I was happy with the purchase I had made I took lots of different pictures out side in the garden and of my big pussy tat silvester then downloaded them to my pc were I cut some of them down to size then eventualy printed them off on a friends pc ,all the cables were easy to use and all the drivers installed first go I was also happy to find free image processing software with the camera which had some brilliant special effects you could use to make your pictures stand out.
        The following weekend I took the camera for a night out with my friends I always used desposable camera's on on nights out in the past but thought it try it out,the first thing I noticed was the flash took a while to go off this was'nt that much of a problem at first as it was the start of the night but as the night went on it started to really bug me,also after 18 pictures the the duracel m3 batterys disided to run out on me and as this is a digital camera it car'nt be used with out batterys so i wished id taken out one of my many spair disposible cameras instead.
        The memmory card can fit around 26 pictures at a high resolution on its 16mb which is the same as most 35mm cameras which is;nt that many but enought for a small night out,I think if it was'nt for the bad points of this camera it would have been a good purchase as it does take good pictures in the day,its the cameras night photo takeing that really does let it down and the batterys.

        FACTORS FOR
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        LCD screen makes picture takeing alot easyer than is was in days gone by ,this is becuase the picture you see on the screen will be the same as you will get on you final picture that is taken,XD memmory card is easy to remove and put into your card reader thus not running the battery down on your camera as it would useing the USB cable,great software and drivers means no buying software straight away after purchase also there is included a very last instruction booklet for people arn;nt are technologe friendly,also checking your pictures you have already taken is very easy all you have to do it press one button and you can view them all in a simple menu.

        FACTORS AGAINST
        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        Very poor battery life meaning you use far to many AA battery's takeing pictures,no recharge able batterys included plus the batterys available specialy for the phone are far to exspensive ,a Lithium-Ion rechargeable battery plus the charger cost you £27.50 which is far to much money,flash takes far to long to take pictures meaning people are standing around for far to long looseing the mood,camera is not suitable for takeing out on night out as its far to bulky for a pocket or a handbag,silver plastic on the case also scratches very easyley,digital zoom is a useless add-on which does nothing more than the software on the included cd does,

        OVER ALL
        ^^^^^^^^^
        This camera is is not suitable for night use and would only be recomended for day pictures,I was'nt happy with this purchase as i wanted a good camera for night and day picture,this camera may look cheap at first but buying a larger memmory card plus a card reader and recharge able battery soon add to the price by around
        £60 meaning this camera is'nt as cheap as you first thoughi would'nt recomend this camera unless you only want to take daylight picture really as it is not sutable for anything more the software is good tho shame the red-eye fixer does'nt work well but for adding special effects and lightening your picture its good enough plus there is no optical zoom on the camera either over all i thing this is a camera that could have been made alot better if more time was spent ironin gout its problems

        THIS REVIEW WAS ORIGINALY WROTE BY MYSELF (FUTURENOIR) FOR CIAO AND IS ALL MY OWN WORK.

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        • More +
          30.08.2005 17:04
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          Simple to use. Good results with the minimum of effort.

          I once swore that I would never bother with a digital camera. The cheap models produced disappointing “webcam” type results and a fortune would need to be paid to get anything that rivalled the 35mm SLR (Single Lens Reflex) cameras. However, all has changed within the space of a few years and with Dixons recently announcing they were due discontinue stocking conventional film cameras, I suppose it was inevitable I would be won over.

          Why I Needed One - I’m an Ebay user and the cheap webcam I used for placing photos of items I was auctioning just didn’t hack it. I’m also a cheapskate who hates waste! Whilst I’ve owned a half decent film camera for many years, buying a film, not wanting to waste pictures yet anxious to see the results, sending the completed film to the lab etc meant that it only came out of its case on special occasions. Initially, I was bought the Olympus Camedia C150 as a gift where the brief was “just get something cheap with an LCD screen I can use for the Ebay stuff”. The Camedia, I would soon discover, is far more versatile and I am on my way to taking more photos in the 6 months of ownership than I have ever taken on conventional cameras in my life.

          In the early days of digital cameras, you could tell the difference and film always looked better. This is not the case anymore, with all but a small minority of film purists who refuse give in to the digital age.

          The Camedia is about the size of a 35mm compact, yet has many of the features of an SLR without the bulkiness. The lens cover slides back and this turns the camera on and gets it ready for action, so you really can slip it out of the pocket and capture that moment without messing around with any settings.

          In the default auto mode, the built in flash will activate when it is needed and the Camedia has autofocus, so it’s ideal for quick snapshots. However, there are a multitude of other settings available for that shot that needs a little more time and care to set up, for example the night mode. To take night scenes where a flash would spoil the affect, the night mode will disable the flash and select a slower shutter speed automatically. The Camedia will also take short video clips (no sound) which are saved as popular format “Quick Time” movies.

          Special Effects are probably more relevant to the software/graphics packages you use once your image has been transferred to your computer, but the camera does have the ability to rotate and resize photos as well as turning them into black and white or sepia. This is no doubt very useful to the growing number of people with digital cameras who don’t want to be bothered transferring them to a PC. (Those who take their memory cards to the photolab or to the photoshop at the supermarket, or maybe those with standalone photo-printers ).

          The memory card is the XD type. There is a 16MB card included in the package which will store 32 High Quality images, 11 Super High Quality Images (at 1,600 x 1,200 resolution), 76 images at 1, 024 x 768 (adequate quality for snapshots) and will go to a lower resolution for about 165 “fun” shots. I keep mine on the High Quality setting, but I invariably reduce the image in size and quality if I am putting the finished photo on a website. In my opinion, the 16MB card is too small a capacity, which is why I bought a 64MB card within days of first using the camera. 64MB will allow around 120 high quality images and 64mb cards only cost £10 to £20. The Camedia will take up to a 256MB card, but unless you are taking it for a 6 month trek to the far East, or plan to take lots of video clips, I wouldn’t bother with anything so big.

          To activate different modes, you need to scroll through the options on the LCD screen and select. This can be a little fiddly, but probably no more than changing settings on an SLR. The only improvement I could suggest to Olympus would be to have a facility to store frequently used settings, but for a camera around the £100 mark, who am I to complain?

          There is an extensive manual included, though there’s also a “Quick Guide” for those of us who want to use it within minutes of taking it out of the box. I would recommend studying the manual. I’ve been more than happy with the quality of the snapshots I have taken, but the manual will show you how to fine tune the settings to get as near to professional results as you can.

          The Camedia C150 comes with a USB lead to connect to your PC in order to transfer the images from the XD card, though I already had a card reader attached to the PC, so the lead is rarely used. Images are saved in JPEG and video clips in Quick Time MOV format. The XD card will show up in Windows as an additional drive and you can use “My Computer” or “Explorer” to transfer the files over and clear the XD card to make room for more images, or you can use the software provided by Olympus called “Camedia Master”.

          Camedia Master will recognise your Camedia as soon as it is connected via the USB lead and will automatically download all the images from your card onto the PC. There is a photo editor included which will allow you to resize, edit, crop, apply special effects and organise your photos in folders/albums. Camedia Master also includes a number of other features allowing greeting cards and calendars to be produced from your photos, but to get any kind of functionality out of these “extras” you have to pay to upgrade the software to the full edition. I didn’t think this was worth it with as plenty of other programs such as Microsoft Publisher and Paint Shop Pro do the same job.

          Tips

          -Don’t bother with the 2.5x zoom facility. Using the zoom on the Camedia will not keep the high resolution/detail and you will leave yourself open to effects of camera shake. Take a photo in normal mode and use the software to zoom and enlarge the part of the image you want.

          -Buy an additional XD card of at least 64mb to adequately cope with a large amount of photos. Keep the 16mb supplied card as a spare

          -Buy a cheap card reader to attach to your PC, so you don’t have to attach the camera to the PC.

          -Use the viewfinder for most of your shots if at all possible. Using the LCD screen to frame your subject will run the batteries down rapidly.
          -Invest in some rechargeable batteries as they will soon lose power, particularly if you use flash, although I believe this is the case with most digital cameras. (The Camedia uses “AA” size batteries.)

          I’m very pleased with my Camedia C150 and I don’t think I will even need to think about replacing or upgrading for many years, something you can’t say about most PC related equipment these days. It has allows me to be a snapshot photographer who can double as a (albeit poor man’s) David Bailey if need be.

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          • More +
            30.07.2005 17:12
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            Overall a great camera during the day, just lets itself down when the lights go down.

            I have had an Olympus C-150 for about nine months, and find it a great camera - its easy and simple to use, has a reasonable battery life and menu structure is clear and simlple. To date it has always taken great pictures during the day or in well lit places, the one draw back it does have is its capability to take night shots or in darker places - often these shots appear fuzzy and blured or dont come out at all, appearing just as a black screen.

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            • More +
              07.09.2004 06:25

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              i bought 2 of these wonderful little cameras last september just before going on holiday, one for myself and one for my other half. i have been a keen photographer for many years and for a while was semi professional but i had never ben tempted to venture into the digital field. the name of olympus in the world of 35mm is synonymous with quality, this and the low price swung it for me. in less than half an hour i was producing excellent images but more surprising my technophobic wife was getting equally good results. the camera is neat robust and well made, it has a video feature, settings for portrait, landscape and close up. the 2 megapixels give good prints up to 8 x 10 inches. it is very simple to use and with rechargeable batteries has very good battery life. it has a very large tft viewing screen and a bright clear viewfinder which gives a true representation of the image being recorded. the software supplied is very good and includes a photo editing suite which makes the results even better. as an indication of the results given by this little beauty, i took some prints of our holiday into work and one colleague made the comment "they look like picture postcards" now that is a compliment

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              23.06.2004 04:53
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              I have looked and looked for a digital camera for ages, to be honest as I am no expert I found the whole thing quite daunting. I have always been a 35mm type person and I feel quite confident with most aspects of normal cameras. But the whole digital field is new. I have used a few digital cameras but buying my own and what do I want it to do, that was something else. Then along came Christmas and the most amazing woman in the whole wide world had been out looking, researching and discreetly asking me about what I would look for. The end result is she gave me a really amazing present. I can honestly say I really had no idea that was what I was getting. For some months now I have been playing with my new toy, now is the time to let you know how I have found it. I am one of those look at the manual later people, this was not too bad as the camera is simplicity itself. As you read through this, you will find it crammed full of all those technical words that people hate, I have tried to keep this to an absolute minimum, but it is hard. I personally do not like all the jargon, all I want to know is does it take good pictures, yes. Is it easy to use, yes and is it good value for money again yes. Then is it easy to install the software again yes and does the software work well, yes again. After unpacking the fairly large blue box that the camera came in, I was presented with a very smart looking silver camera, as well as some leads loads of books and a CD. So putting those all aside I opened the battery compartment and loaded the two supplied AA batteries. That's it I thought, hmmmmm how wrong was I. It did not seem to work, okay time for the manual. Amongst all the other stuff in the box was an ?XD? card, this is where your pictures are stored (its the film if you like, o
              nly its reusable), now following the instructions its simply a question of opening a little door on the front and inserting the card. The overall look of the camera is really great in a satin silver. On the front is the shutter, behind this is the lens, the viewfinder and the inbuilt flash. On the top right is the picture button, I know that most people are right handed but I have yet to see any type of camera where this is on the left. On the rear you see a four way directional arrow pad and two further buttons below this one is called the quick view the other ?OK?. To the left is the eyepiece with an orange and green LED along with the 1.8inch LCD monitor. The orange LED indicates if you need flash, when blinking that it is charging and a steady indication that the flash is ready. The green when steady indicates that the focus and exposure are properly set. Batteries are inserted underneath the camera, you will also find a screw hole for attaching the camera to a tripod. On one side is a rubber cover, beneath this you will find, a video out socket and a socket for a direct 3.4v input. On the other side is a place to put your wrist strap, another smaller rubber cover which houses the connection socket for the lead that goes directly to your computers USB and a door that opens to allow you to place the XD card. The other stuff in the box for those who would like to know was.. You get a wrist strap, this just clips onto the camera, I always use one on every camera that I have owned, two very good reasons, first I find it harder to lose a camera when its on my wrist and more importantly if ever I drop the camera it does not go crashing to the floor. A USB lead for connecting the camera to a computer. A video cable. Until I started wr
              iting this, the cable had remained in the box. For the sake of being as comprehensive as possible I had a look to see what it did. Well one end plugged into the camera and the other into the TV video socket (yellow pin) when I pressed the quick view on my camera instead of it showing a picture on the cameras LCD it came up in full glorious colour on the television set. This will mean I can subject the whole family to pictures. Even better though was when I opened the cover on the camera the television came to life this has endless possibilities one that I think extremely useful is if the camera is set up on top of the television, then self timer mode is selected you can all gather in a family picture and watch what the picture will look like before the camera takes it. A 140 page basic manual in English, French, German and Spanish. This is at it says quite basic, it does give you all the important information about getting started, what the various parts of your camera does and how to use it. A 68 page booklet about safety precautions in English, French, German, Spanish and Japanese. This tells you about batteries how to look after them and warnings to help you maintain your camera in good condition. There is also a pink notice on batteries and this gives you a warning about how long batteries last. Well this is probably where all digital cameras fall down, the battery consumption is very heavy and even long life Alkaline batteries (Duracell) do not last very long. Olympus recommend using either Lithium batteries or NiMH rechargeable batteries, although I have not tried this yet, it is something I am giving very serious consideration to, after all when using video cameras it is usual to use rechargeable battery packs. As most of the work done by the camera uses the battery (the
              screen, the flash and the zoom etc) it makes sense. Instructions and specifications on the XD picture card, the one that came with the camera is the smallest they sell its 16MB that is enough to store 45 pictures at a high quality setting and size of 1600 x 1200. Although the amount of pictures does tend to vary, the least I have had though is 41. They also include a quickstart guide, this is the part that at first I overlooked in my haste to play with the camera, it really is worth a few minutes looking at. Also is the chance to join the Olympuser magazine for £19.95. A warranty card. A strange card called Yellowtag. I have never heard of this, as yet I have not used it. But you log on at www.yellowtag.com and follow the registration details, you then put this tiny little sticky tag on your camera, the tag has a unique email address. If you lose the camera and it is found, then the finder will be paid a reward from yellowtag when they email the address on the camera. As the owner of the camera you will get an SMS text alert to your mobile along with an email all inside 15 minutes. This service comes with the camera and is prepaid for two years, I do not know how much it costs after the two free years are up. Something else I really must look into. Instructions for installing the software onto your PC. Along with the software on a CD itself. To make the review easier to understand I will write more about the software at the end of the review. This is where the fun begins, the time to become photographer of the year, well that is how I felt. The first thing is to open the front cover, this is a simple slide door that protects the lens when not in use. Having been a 35mm person I naturally found myself looking through the eyepiece (Viewfinder
              ) to take a picture, this despite the fact that the camera incorporates a 1.8 inch LCD monitor. The viewfinder has a target when you use it, in the same way you get with most film cameras. It did not take me long to start using the monitor to take my pictures, as you can see the picture that you can take and adjust accordingly, it?s even better than that though. For if you close the lens cover then press open view, you can look at all the pictures you have taken. This gives you the chance to delete the ones you do not want. One real advantage of using the monitor is when you zoom in on a subject, you will see exactly what you will be getting in the way of a picture, this you cannot do with the viewfinder. Another thing worth noting is when the camera card is full, you get a blue screen with red writing saying ?CARD FULL?. On the box it said that the camera has a 2.5x zoom, now I found this confusing, as I could not see how the lens moved nor could I see anywhere to add a zoom lens. Silly me its digital, and it does it all by itself, well not quite two of the buttons on the rear (the up and down on the directional arrows) are used for telephoto (zoom in) and wide angle (zoom out), its not called a digital zoom for nothing. You can also use this for taking moving pictures, I have tried this and found it an ok thing. But it is only short duration, takes up your memory card and is nowhere as good as a VHS movie camera. Call me old fashioned, but products have uses. A phone is for talking and texting, in general they do a poor job of taking pictures, a web cam can also take pictures again with poor quality. A camera takes good pictures provided you have a high enough resolution. But for moving pictures you want a movie camera, one that is made to do the job. The camera has four flash modes, off &#
              65;uto-Flash, Red Eye reduction and fill in flash, these are selected through the four way directional arrow pad and the on screen instructions. Also by way of the four way directional arrow pad you have other camera choices. Macro Mode, this gives you close up pictures from as near as eight inches, very useful if you have items of jewellery that are valuable and you wish to have pictures for insurance purposes. You can enlarge pictures that you have taken to look closer at them. Protect pictures so they cannot accidentally be deleted. Index display, two in one pictures and panorama shooting. The software really has two main parts first the main program. From here you can transfer pictures directly onto your PC and save them onto your hard drive. One problem I did encounter is where the saved pictures were actually located, for those of you who are interested the following is where I found them on my PC. The reason I was so interested is I have other software packages that I prefer using for editing pictures, and if I wanted to email a picture it does help to know where it is. "C:WINDOWSApplication DataOLYMPUSCamedia Master 4AlbumSamplesWHATEVER YOU CALL YOUR ALBUM". I hope that makes life easier. You get a full user guide for the software in the form is a 149 page document in PDF format (acrobat reader), this will help anyone who really wants to get the most out of the software, from storing and editing through to creating postcards, calendars and a whole host of other features. As I said earlier I do not use the software for much apart from transferring to my PC. I think that most peop
              le will be the same, you find a software package that you like and tend to stick to it The second part is the full Olympus Digital Camera Reference Manual. This is a 148 page document in PDF format (acrobat reader) This gives you all the specific details about the camera and what it can do. Since I have had mine I have only scratched the surface of what it can do, and I know that I have years of fun and learning ahead of me with this camera. Yes I have started to read this manual, mainly because I am so impressed with the camera that I want to get the most from it. For a price of £119.95 I think that this really does represent great value for money and it is one of my favourite ever presents.

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                28.12.2003 05:13
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                I just received this as a Christmas present. The camera itself is compact and lightweight. It comes with two pencil batteries, but I was advised by a veteran digital camera user to buy rechargeable batteries, which I now have done - as the display feature takes alot of power to run. I'd say this is pretty good advice for anyone buying any digital camera (assuming they all take ordinary batteries!) Anyhow, the camera comes with a "Quick start guide", which does exactly what it says. It gives easy instructions on how to get your camera up and running straight away. More detailed function guides can be found in the main booklet. The pictures are excellent quality, I have already loaded over 40 onto the PC, from the last 3 days, and printed some out. The pictures on the camera can be zoomed in up to 4 times the original. There is an autofocus on the camera, I have even managed to take a couple of photos of myself with the kids! You can change to sepia or monochrome on the camera, though I havent fully worked these functions out yet! There is also a camcorder type function, though this only runs for a few seconds at a time. But excellent for those moments where the whole point is lost in a still picture! To say that the camera is simple enough for a child to use is very true. My 5 year old has worked out the basics, and loves it. The beauty with this is I can just delete any strange pictures instead of paying for development to find lots of photos of feet. The disk contained in the box has Camedia 4 on it, which is very simple to use, and allows you to view your pictures, edit them, create calendars, albums, etc. The flash is very bright, and I have had a few problems with red-eye, but until I work out how to prevent this, I'll have to invest in one of those pens! I have taken pictures indoors and out, daylight and night, and the quality is always the same. My only complaint is t
                hat after you press the button, it takes a few seconds to take the picture. I'm no expert in digital cameras, so I am not sure if this is unique to my camera. Its fine with adults or children you can explain to, but younger kids have a tendency to move, or the moment might be lost by the time it snaps - but its not a major complaint. Perhaps more expensive cameras have other exciting features, more pixels, etc - but for a first camera, or for one (just!) under £100 I would highly recommend this one.

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              • Product Details

                The CAMEDIA C-150 is the perfect model for those who want to explore the world of digital photography at an extremely affordable price. Featuring several automatic and creative functions and a bright lens (f2.8), this auto focus model guarantees top-quality results while remaining incredibly easy to use. The C-150 also contains a well-laid out multi-language menu with a choice of four languages. Its operation as well as picture framing and viewing is aided by the 1.8-inch LCD monitor, the largest in this camera category. Thanks to its compact design, the C-150 can be taken almost anywhere to shoot the most spontaneous moments.

                The CAMEDIA C-150 offers exceptional ease of use for a smooth entry into the world of digital photography. Just insert batteries and xD-Picture Card, then point and shoot. Everything else is built in: automatic systems for exposure, focusing, ISO, white balance and an integrated flash with various modes as well as a high-quality 38 mm AF lens (equivalent to a 35 mm camera). As such, the CAMEDIA C-150 is perfect not only for complete beginners to photography, but also for newcomers to its digital form. Four scene programs provide the photographer with pre-set shooting parameters for common motifs, such as portraits, self-portraits, night scenes and landscapes.

                Besides automatic white balance, a selection can be made between four pre-sets for sunlight, overcast conditions, tungsten and fluorescent lights for true color reproduction. Other functions, including panorama mode, 2 in 1 shooting, and recording of short movie sequences in QuickTime Motion JPEG format, offer the photographer further innovative shooting options. But the fun does not end there. Photos captured in color may be changed to black and white or sepia, altering compositions to suit personal tastes or capture a particular mood. The image rotation function is particularly useful when viewing photos originally taken in the portrait format, on a TV.

                Thanks to the USB AutoConnect interface, images are downloaded quickly and easily to a computer. The CAMEDIA Master software delivered with the camera offers users numerous options for further processing their digital photos. Images are saved onto an xD-Picture Card, the ultra-compact media storage card.

                The CAMEDIA C-150 supports the EXIF 2.2 standard as well as PIM II, enabling compatible printers to apply the saved data in order to produce optimized results. Featuring 2.0-megapixel resolution, the CAMEDIA C-150 is an extremely versatile and affordable digital camera which is child's play to operate.