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C++ Programming Books in general

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      30.01.2001 21:19
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      C++ can hardly be said to be the easiest programming language around to learn and yet many University courses use it as their beginning language. It is also widely used in industry and therefore at some atrage you may find yourself faced with the prospect of having to become more familiar with it. All academic textbooks teach the same subject but some are so much better than others at acheiving this and when you consider that you could easily be handing over £30+ for a book of this nature(especially on C++) you need to know that you are getting the right one. Introducing C++ by David Dench and Brian Prior is an excellent book for all beginning C++ programmers. It assumes a little knowledge of programming in general, but nothing about C++ and is therefore ideal to get you started. Indeed, it only really assumes that you know the basics about programming in general as well - there is no need to be an accomplished programmer to use this book. The first chapter introduces you to general program structure and layout - how to compile a program and programming layout conventions - that sort of thing before going on to introduce the concept of variables and operators. This is done in a highly uncomplicated fashion, using for example the cartoon drawing of a man with many pockets to illustrate the concepts of variables and run-time storage. Although the concepts of object orientation(C++'s main advance over C) are introduced here, programming examples are done in a linear style to ensure confusion is avoided for the novice. At the end of this chapter(and all chapters) are some exercises for you to test what you have learnt. The next three chapters introduce the fundamental building blocks of all programming languages - Input/output processes, functions and control structures. By the time you have mastered these, you should be able to write reasonable programs in C++ - although of course nothing spectacular. All these chapters are handled in an
      easy manner, giving lots of program code examples(sadly lacking in many other books of the same ilk) and self test questions to aid you on your journey to becoming versed in the language. Again, exercises are provided at the end of each chapter to test your knowledge against. Chapter 5 is where the concept of object orientated programming is introduced and is handled far better here than I have seen in any other text book. The concept is actually quite simple but somehow dificult to grasp especially if you have programmed in a language such as C or Pascal before as it is a totally different way of thinking. Here, the concepts or classes, overloading and inheritance are spelled out in a comprehensive fashion again with lots of real code examples and easy to follow diagrams to ease you on your way. The final three chapters introduce the concepts of data structures and pointers and their usage in C++ before concluding with some example programs to test your knowledge on. Overall, this is one of the better books I have seen for C++ and it is also quite cheap as well(around £16). At just over 230 pages it is not going to be the definitive guide to C++ programming but it will certainly set you on the right path and is I believe the best place for novice programmers to start. There are loads of examples here which are essential for learning the language well and easy to follow diagrams and pictures to aid in understanding the concepts too. The language is also particularly non-techie which is something of a godsend if you are like me and hate all the jargon. Buy this book if you are a first year university student studying C++ as a module(or better still buy it before you go and read through it) or anyone with an active interest in learning the language. It comes highly recommended from me having used it alongside my first year studies myself(and got a mark above 80% for the module with its aid).

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        06.07.2000 01:18

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        This has got to be one of the best c++ books I have ever read I have found it most interesting and that it tells you allot about c++. If I will to recomend this to a friend and I. This is because it has a funky little program called hello world. Like this. #include<iostream.h> int main() { cout<<"Hello World!"; return 0; } That is one of the programs they use to teach you how to program successfully. I have found that now i can do very successful programs and that we are trying to put on the www. If you wanted you could even make a program that says hello my name is Rupert Cornilious Brown. If you do not buy this book for learning c++ the programing language you must be verry strange. if you were not to use this book you could robably use C++ for dumies. That book was also useful.

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