Welcome! Log in or Register
£12.99 Best Offer by: blackwells.co.uk See more offers
18 Reviews
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    18 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      16.06.2010 18:38
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Once you master it is highly addictive...

      Having always played Poker for years now, both five card poker and Texas Hold Em I felt like trying my hand at another game a few months back and decided to play Cribbage as had a heard a few friends and family speak about the game and told me it was pretty good. The first impression I got when I saw the pack of cards, matches and a long narrow piece of wood with 60 holes in it was that it looked quite easy to play but after having played this a bit now it's deceptive as I think it can be quite hard to be honest.

      The basic aim of the game is that you are each given a side of the piece of wood and the idea is to move your matches that you have along the whole length of your particular side twice and then back into your starting position. You have two pegs and they can leap frog each other as they move around the board.


      The object of the game is to move your matches along the full length of your side twice and then back into your starting position. You have two pegs and they leap frog each other as they move around the "board".

      So, the question is how do you know how many moves you can have? Well the cards come into play here and decide how many moves you and your opponent get. At the start of the game each player is dealt six cards and you have to make the choice which four you wish to keep and which two to get rid of. The two cards that are thrown away from each player create another extra hand. The best score you can get in any given turn is 24. For each combination of 15 points you get two moves on the board. So for example, if you are dealt a King or another card with the same value like Jack, and three fives then you get nine points which is 3 x 15 at 2 points each and then three points for a three of a kind.

      If you want my opinion, it can take a bit of time getting into it and understanding how the game works but once you play it a bit it gets quite addictive. I think it's a game of luck but does have an element of skill. I really enjoy this now and it's something different from the normal card games I play. So if you're keen on trying another card game then try Cribbage as it's not bad at all.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        16.03.2009 15:16
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        6 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A True Giant Amongst Card Games

        Cribbage is an ancient and fascinating card game that can be played with two, three or four players.

        The two player version is easily the best as it involves the highest level of skill and tactical awareness.

        If I were to explain the whole game in depth it would take a few thousand words and by the end of it you would think I was mad and that I was making it all up.

        So instead I'll explain the general basics in the hope that you give it a try because it really is a great game that you can play either at home or on something like a train or plane journey. It features luck, skill, surprise and twists and turns.

        What do you need to play it?

        One pack of cards, a cribbage board and the knowledge of the rules. The rules can easily be found for free on the web.

        What's a cribbage board?

        It's an oblong board (usually made of wood) that is used for keeping score. However, you could just as easily keep score on a blank sheet of paper. Once you get into it though you will want a proper cribbage board or you may even want to make one of your own as many people do.

        How does the game work?

        (I will tackle just the two player version; the three and four player versions have the same rules apart from a slight variation in how many cards are dealt at the start)

        Each player is dealt 6 cards face down.

        You then decide which 4 cards to retain in your hand and which to put in the "box".

        The "box" is a third hand made up from the two discarded cards from each of the player's hands. The "box" is then given to one of the players every other round so that they have their own 4 card hand and 4 card "box" hand.

        I BET YOU ARE ALREADY CONFUSED!!

        Like the game of cricket it is so dead simple to play but the rules seem very complicated when really they are not.

        In order to determine which of your 4 cards to retain and which you discard into the "box" hand you need to consider two things:

        1. To retain 4 cards that score well (and "peg" well)
        2. To discard good potential scoring cards into the "box" if it's your turn to be given the box and to discard bad potential scoring cards if it's your opponent's turn to be given the "box".

        Once the now three 4 card hands have been established the remainder of the pack of cards is cut and this reveals a "community card" that is added to each of the 3 four card hands. Still with me?!!!

        So how do hands score points?

        Without going into absolute detail, your five card hand , be it a retained hand or a "box" given to you hand, scores points by adding combinations and permuatations of cards together in it to total exactly15 (e.g. a 7 of clubs and an 8 of hearts, picture cards count as 10), plus you get points for having 2, 3 or 4 of a kind in your hand, plus you get points for having "runs" in your hand like 5,6,7 and you get points for having a 4 or 5 card flush.

        So aside from the adding up to 15 aspect much of the scoring related combinations have a close relationship to recognised poker hands.

        Above is a brief explanation and there are some subtle variations but if you play with someone experienced you will pick it all up very quickly.

        What is "pegging"?

        Pegging takes place after the pack is cut to determine the "community" card but before all three hands are openly declared and scored from.

        Again, pegging is easy in practice to do but awkward to explain in writing. Basically, each player turns one card over at a time of his choice (from his retained 4 card hand) and the opponent responds with one of his own and so on and so forth. The object is to add the cards together as they fall and reach a target of 31.

        If you reach 31 with your card you score 2 points. If you make a pair (i.e. you put down an 8 on top of your opponent's 8) you get 2 points. There are also points for 3 and four of a kind and for runs (straights). There is also a point for not making 31 but near 31!

        Again, there are some variations I won't mention. Pegging along with the initial decision making at the start of the game regarding which two cards to discard is very tactical and will often determine who wins the game overall. In fact the initial card discarding is much more of an exact science which with practice you will get 99.9% correct compared to how a computer might play.

        Pegging differs because as the cards are layed down you can start to work out which other cards your opponent is holding. There is also usually some banter between players during pegging in which you are trying to extract clues and information out of each other and this can also lead to some lying/bluffing about what you are holding, which is allowable in the rules.

        After establishing the 3 four card hands, cutting the pack, pegging and the declaration of the three hands is over you shuffle the whole pack and deal again. You repeat this process until one player reaches a pre determined aggregate points target first, and that player is the winner!

        One nice thing about cribbage is that you get to learn the sayings used when scoring a declared hand. E.g. If the hand you are holding is K 5 3 2 and the community card is a 9 you will score two points for making a 15 by adding the K & 5 and another 2 points for making 15 by adding the K & 3 & 2, there are no other permutations adding up to 15, you have no pairs, runs or flushes. So what you say when you have this hand is "Fifteen-Two, Fifteen-Four, and there ain't no more",

        Not all hands have an appropriate declaration saying or rhyme but many do and you can make up sayings if you wish that fit in with the hand.

        The best declaration phrase of all, that all cribbage players will know, is when there are no points in your hand. When this happens you simply say "I've got 19". You say this, because it is impossible to score 19 points in a cribbage hand.

        The highest possible points score in one hand is 29. This consists of three fives and a jack in your hand and a five as the community card. I have never had this hand, so far.

        This is the best ever card game I have played and it holds some great memories of playing it with people sadly no longer around.

        It's also the kind of game that you set out to just play for an hour but enjoy it so much that you play for many hours.

        Some people play it for money but really it is not that sort of game. It is a very social game that also tests your brain and your tactical ability.

        I would highly recommend that you try it.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          26.11.2008 20:47
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          27 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A fun family game with lots of heckling opportunities

          I have decided its time for me to come clean and admit that I'm really a 60 year old man with whiskers who likes a pint of an evening down the local pub while playing a game of cribbage. (Don't say I can see that from the photo).

          OK I'm not really and I certainly don't have the whiskers (hopefully) but that's the perception when you mention that one of your favourite pastimes is a game of cribbage.

          I'm here to bring this underrated game, kicking and screaming into the noughties, this game should be found in all homes right there beside the chess board, draughts, scrabble board and monopoly. So I'm starting a one woman campaign to bring this game back to the masses.

          Admittedly I wasn't even brought up on cribbage, I hadn't even heard the name before staying with my brother in England a few years ago. Since he had left home for Uni and then married an English girl, setting up home in Southern England we discovered just how englified he had become. My football mad, hard drinking, raucous brother was watching rugby, playing skittles or sitting at home of an evening drinking wine and playing cribbage with the wife and kids.

          On the first night of our visit when he appeared with his little wooden board with the little holes and the coloured sticks and announced "Who's for a game of cribbage then" hubby and I looked at each other before mumbling a quick "ooookkkk then".

          We split into two teams, him and her against himself and me, and I was hooked right from the first game. They absolutely annihalated us, as years of playing gave them a better idea of the cards to keep and the cards to throw away and they also played together as a team, placing cards which they believed would help their partner.

          The craic was mighty, as we made our way pitifully round the board, comments abounded such as "Your not just getting skunked your getting double skunked" (you have to say it with the the M & S sexy voice) and other loving brotherly comments.

          As anyone who reads my reviews knows I am slightly on the competitive side so as soon as we were completely and utterly whipped I demanded a replay and on the third game due to gaining an understanding of the rules and a bit of luck with the cards we managed to win a round. It is marginally possible of course that they lost on purpose just so we could go to bed.

          - - What is Cribbage - -

          Cribbage is a card game for two-six players that involves playing or grouping cards in a combination which scores the highest amount of points. To play you need a cribbage board to keep the score and a deck of cards with which too play. There are two parts to the game, the first where you play your cards in conjunction with the other players to peg points, the second where you show your hand at the end of each go and have the score pegged on the board.

          The purpose of the game is to be the first player to score 121 points. These points are scored for cards which together add up to fifteen, thirty-one, or are pairs, triples and quadruples, flushes or runs.

          - - How to Play - -

          For a four player game played in two teams of two, each person gets five cards. You can look at your hand and choose which of the five cards is the least likely to help your score taking into account the scoring mechanism above.

          All four of the discarded cards are placed together and form the dealers crib which he can use to score extra points at the end of each round. You must take it in turns to be the dealer and get the crib.

          You start with the player on the left of the dealer, and in turns put down one card, this card will depend on the previous card played as you get points for scoring 15 or 31, runs, pairs etc. Each player calls out the new value of the cards as they add their card to the current go. You peg 2 points for making the score 15, or matching the previous players card to get a pair etc.

          The value of the cards cannot go above 31 so the last person to play gets 1 point for being close to 31 or two points for getting to 31.

          You move your peg around the board this way and once you have used all your cards we have the show. You count up the points in your hand again for pairs, triples, runs etc. and a card is turned up on top of the deck which can also be used by all players.

          This is the time when you start cussing and throwing your hand down in disgust as the card you resigned to the crib was worth more in points with the new card than most of the others still in your hand.

          If you have a jack of the same suit as the turned over card you score one point for his nob. If the dealer turns over a jack then its two for his heels. After he scores his hand the dealer scores the crib as well.

          I have come across some strange home brew rules such as taking a muggins, if someone counts their score up incorrectly the other team\player can shout out muggins and prove the score is incorrect he can peg the points himself.

          While there is a bit of luck involved with the hand that you get dealt, there is a fair amount of skill involved in playing the correct card at the right time, throwing the correct card in the discard pile and working well with your partner if you are playing doubles.

          The goal when we play is to score those 121 points before the other player\team read 90 points so that you can laugh and point hysterically while announcing that they have been skunked, on the odd occasion if you can finish before the other player\team has scored 60 points you double skunk them. I think our rule of double skunking if the loser pegs less than 60 points might also be a home brew one.

          Double skunking someone can give you a least three days of wandering about the house and everytime that person complains about something you have or haven't done you have the right to say "At least I wasn't double skunked" causing them to slink off into the darkness head held down.

          This may sound very difficult to follow but it all becomes clear very quickly once you are playing.

          - - The board - -

          We have two boards at home, both have a similar layout but the heavy wooden one is kept at home and the light plastic one is taken on holidays. The board has three different coloured tracks each with 120 holes each player\team follows the same track throughout the game and the saying "they are level pegging" comes from when players have scored the same number of points and their pegs are level on the cribbage board.

          It is very compact as the cards and coloured pegs fit inside the cribbage board which then folds over to keep everything together and fits easily into a rucksack, handbag. Ideal for long plane\boat journeys.

          - - Hints and Tips - I found out the hard way - -

          Don't start with a five as there is a good chance that the next person has a picture card or ten straightaway they peg 2 points.

          If you have a pair play one, if the other player\team has a card of the same value he will play it to claim 2 points leaving you to play the second of the pair and score 6.

          Keep your low cards as there is more chance of you being able to play when it gets closer to 31 letting you peg one or two points.

          - - Is it only for old whiskery men - -

          Absolutely not - We love to play with other adults and the kids love it to play with others their own age or with adults and actually enjoy the mathematics involved in scoring.

          There is always laughter surrounding this game often fuelled by shouts of "I've got his knob in my hand" or the horseracing type commentary as we move around the board which mentions the words "level pegging" a lot.

          I did try the internet to find out where the saying one for his nob comes from but couldn't I did however discover that this is the only game you are allowed to play in a pub for money.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            20.06.2007 21:56
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            8 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            see review

            When i was younger my mam taught me how to play Cribbage, this is also known as crib for short. I must say it is not an easy game to play, but i will try my best to explain it. Now i will not bore you with all the history of crib, so lets get straight on with how to play.

            The first things you will need are, deck of cards, and a peg board. This is a wooden board, full of holes, and has metal pegs that stick into the holes for scoring. If you do not have a peg board you can use paper but this will take abit longer to do the scoring.

            I am going to run you through the 2 player game, although you can play with upto 4 players. As i have never played the 4 player game i am not sure how that one works.

            Now to get the game started, both players must cut the pack of cards, this is to determine who the first dealer will be. The person to cut the highest card will deal.

            When you deal, both players recieve 6 cards each, they then have to decide which 4 cards to keep, and choose the 2 to throw into the crib, the crib is classed as an extra hand for the dealer, which can score them points at the end of the hand.

            The non-dealer then cuts the pack of cards, and the top card taken from the cut is then placed on top of the pack face up. If a jack is drawn from the cut, the dealer then recieves 2 points for his heals. The card turned over also counts towards the end score of your hand, but this does not have to be included to get points for a run or a flush, and may not score you any points at all.

            Now the 4 cards you have in your hand must be placed down one at a time alternatly starting with the non-dealer first. The amounts are added together as each card is placed down, if the cards add up to 15 during this, the person that placed the card down will recieve 2 points.

            The most amount you can play up to is 31 points, if you get to exactly 31 thats also 2 points awarded. If no-one can go, which means you would go over 31. The person who placed the last card will get 1 point, then you would start from zero and continue playing the cards again, until you have none left.

            During placing the cards if you get a pair you get 2 points, for 3 of a kind 6 points for four of a kind 12 points.

            Now for the final stage of the hand. The person who did not deal must place their hand down first. The scoring is as follows:

            Pair - 2 points
            3of a kind - 6 points
            4 of a kind - 12 points
            flush 4 or 5 cards of same suit - 4-5 points
            Run I.E 5,6,7,8 - 4-5 points
            Cards equaling 15 - 2 points

            So the first scores are added together and put on the players scores. Then the dealers score is added up, then the dealer turns over their crib hand, and those scores are also added onto the dealers score. The other person then deals and the same happens as before. This continues until a player reaches 61 points or you could chose to play to a different amount if you wanted to.

            Ok heres some tips for youuuu:

            * Never throw any 5's or point scoring cards into the crib, unless you are the dealer.

            * Do not come in with a 10 or a 5 on the first card downed, as chances are your opponent will have a 10 or a 5 in their hand to score points.

            * Save an ace till last if you can, it could get you that extra point.

            Thats about it for crib, i know it sounds a hard game to play, but once you learn the game its easy. I hope my review has helped to make it easier for you. xxx

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              24.10.2002 02:56

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              My husband and I learned how to play cribbage when I was expecting our youngest boy. Because I had to stay in bed most of time in the last two months of my pregnancy . A friend came over to our home and show us how to play, she even purchase our very first cribbage board. We have had a cribbage board and playing cards in our home now for 24 years. It's great fun. My husband and I still play at least once a month. The price for the game is still affordable and the instructions are somewhat easy to understand.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              08.08.2002 02:00
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              16 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              Introduction ============ Cribbage, or "crib" as its initiates would have it, is one of the great English card games. It's also a game that seems to be taught almost entirely by experience - I've rarely heard of someone who "learn it from a book", as Manuel would have it - so I'm going to have some trouble here... ah well, let us not be downhearted. Cribbage is said to have been introduced by Sir John Suckling in the early 17th century, though there is no certain evidence for this. However, there are several references before 1700, and it would seem reasonable to assume that the game was by then reasonably widespread. There are several varieties of cribbage, but probably the most enjoyable for the majority of players is "six-card cribbage", and that, in its two-player version, is what I will describe here. I can already hear the apoplectic howls from the Hop Pole Inn up the road, where the much more brutal five-card variant (mentioned later) is the One True Way, and it's also fair to say that most local rules accept some variation, but I shall stick doggedly to my course. These are what I play, so you can jolly well put up with it :-) Getting started =============== Cribbage is played with a standard 52-card deck - normal values, with court cards being worth 10 and Aces 1. The dealer deals six cards to each player, face down, and puts the stack to one side. Each player then discards two cards (face down) to the "crib" or "box". This crib belongs to the dealer (deals alternate), and so the dealer will try to maximise his advantage, while the non-dealer will try to discard the most useless cards he has. When this is done, the non-dealer cuts the pack, and the dealer takes the next card (the "turn-up") and places it face-up on the stack. Pegging ======= Non-dealer then starts proceedings (this stage is often called "Pegging&
              quot;) by laying down a card, face up, and announcing its value. Dealer then lays a card of his own - keeping it separate from the other - and announces, not its own value, but the *total* value so far reached. This goes on until either the cards are exhausted (in which case play moves to the Show - see below) or until neither player can play a card without going over 31 (if one can, they may "play against themselves" for so long as they can remain beneath the limit). These cards are turned over (face down), and pegging begins again from zero. The Show ======== The next stage is the Show. The non-dealer shows his hand first, and counts up any scoring combinations (see later) out loud as they do so. The player may count the turned up card from earlier as part of his hand, giving him five cards in all. The dealer then does the same for his hand, and also for the crib. It is very important to get the sums right - if a player fails to claim a score, his opponent may say "muggins!" and claim it for himself. A player may sometimes claim "nineteen" - in fact, this is a euphemistic way of admitting no score, as there is no possible way to make 19 in a cribbage hand. Cribbage scoring ================ The classic way of scoring cribbage games is by means of a dedicated cribbage board. Styles vary, but they are generally wooden, with blocks of ten holes in a 5x2 pattern arranged so that there are 6 blocks up and 2 across. This, all you mathematicians will note, makes 60 holes each way, 120 in all - and cribbage is normally played as first to 61 points or first to 121. Score is kept by means of pegs, whence the expression "level pegging". The ways to score, and when they apply, are as follows: Before Pegging -------------- "His heels" (2 pts) - scored to the dealer if he turns up a Jack when the pack is cut. Pegging only ------------ "Thi
              rty-one" (2 pts) - scored if a player brings the score to exactly 31. "Go" (1 pt) - if a player cannot play a card without exceeding 31, he says "Go", and the other player then "plays against himself" for as long as possible, scoring pairs and runs if applicable. He also pegs 1 point. Show only --------- "Flush" (4/5 pts) - four points are scored if all 4 cards in the hand or crib are of the same suit; 5 if the turn-up is as well. "His nob" (1 pt) - to a player whose hand or crib contains a Jack of the same suit as the turn-up. Pegging and Show ---------------- "Fifteen" (2 pts) - in Pegging, playing a card so that the running total is 15; in the Show, any combination of cards adding up to 15. "Pair" (2 pts), "pair royal" (6 pts) and "double pair royal" (12 pts) - two, three or four cards of the same face value. In Pegging these must be played consecutively. "Run" (3+ pts) - a sequence of cards with consecutive face values. Note that they do not have to be played in order during Pegging - 4,1,3,2 is a perfectly valid 4-card run. An example hand =============== Andy is playing Bob. Andy is the dealer. Andy has been dealt 3,4,5,10,J,J and Bob has A,5,6,9,9,K (I'm assuming there is no chance of a flush, to make things simpler). Andy decides to discard the Jacks, to ensure he gets *something* from the crib. Bob, on the other hand, is trying to minimise Andy's return, and discards the Ace and King. The turn-up proves to be a 9, of the same suit as one of Andy's Jacks. Pegging might go as follows (Bob, as non-dealer, goes first): Bob: 5 ("five") - not a sensible start... Andy: 10 (fifteen for two") - ...and that's why. As court cards count ten as well, a 15 is often made in this situation. Bob: 9 ("nineteen") Andy: 3 (&
              quot;twenty-two") Bob: 9 ("thirty-one for two") - a handy 2 points (The cards so far played are now turned face-down, and counting begins again.) Andy: 4 ("four") - the best card to play to start Pegging, as your opponent cannot make 15, but he must make it possible for you to do so next time. Bob: 6 ("ten") Andy 5 ("fifteen for two, a three-card run is five and one for last is six [2+3+1]") - ouch! Now the Show - Bob has a good hand of 5,6,9,9 plus the turn-up of 9. This gives him "fifteen two, fifteen four, fifteen six" (each of the 9s with the 6) "and a pair royal is 12" (6+6). Andy's hand is a lot less impressive. Including the turn-up he has 3,4,5,9,10 which gives "fifteen two and a three-card run is five". His crib is even worse: A,9,J,J,K - "pair of Jacks and one for his nob is three". Total scores for this deal: Andy pegs 16, Bob 14. Andy will be disappointed with only a two-point advantage despite being dealer, and despite that six-pointer at the end of Pegging. Eight points or so would have been nearer the mark. Tactics ======= There are two main areas of skill in cribbage - choosing which cards to discard into the crib, and ordering the Pegging to your advantage. If you are the dealer, it's often a good idea to discard a five, as there is a good chance of a ten or court card turning up somewhere. Conversely, non-dealer should attempt to be as obstructive as possible - an Ace and a King is the best discard of all. Of course, you won't want to make life difficult for yourself in the Pegging by getting rid of your best cards, so there's a balance to be struck. Common sense will tell you (but not, it seems, Bob) that five is a bad total to play in Pegging - a 15 follows very often. The same applies to bringing the score to 21, as a ten or court card will bring your opponent 2 points for 3
              1. It's also a bad idea to lay down cards close to each other - a "filled-in run" can be most unpleasant (eg 6,2,3,5,4 - 5 points!). Variations ========== In the "brutal five-card variant" mentioned earlier, each player discards two from just five cards, leaving the hand with only three. The crib still has four, and so the correct choice of discards is hugely important. The pressure of this version can be enormous. In four-handed cribbage, two teams of two compete, bridge-style, and discard one of five. There is even a seven-card version (discard three for a ridiculous six-card crib!) and a three-handed version with a "dummy hand" similar to that in bridge. Cribbage is a wonderful game, and played well is exceptionally involving. The balance of skill, luck and intuition is just right, and the tension over the table is often palpable. It would be silly to pretend that it's a game of deep cogitation, but it's fast-paced and exciting, and can be thoroughly recommended. ---------------------- (Most of the multiple choice questions below are not relevant to cribbage ["illustrations"!], so I've left them unanswered/)

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
                More Comments
              • More +
                09.01.2002 02:07
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                43 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                "... and one for his nob", I'd shout out, my face flushed red with a mixture of embarrassment and suppressed giggles. He'd look at me over the top of his glasses without saying a word, for this was a serious business. I counted the holes I had to move my pegs with great care. I knew if I got it wrong he'd call out "muggins" and then he would claim my score. He didn't give any leeway just because I was a young whipper-snapper. If you played cribbage with my grandad you did it properly, or not at all. I don't know why I wanted to learn to play cribbage when I was little. I think it was a mixture of a fascination for the cribbage board and because Pops, as I called him, kept saying it was only a game for grown-ups. "And no wonder", I thought, "when you are allowed to say nob!" I never really understood whose nob you 'got one for' but it sounded very naughty and decadent to my young mind, not that I knew what decadent meant either. Once Pops relented and started to teach me how to play the game my enthusiasm initially dropped - it was so complicated. I couldn't give in though, so I did my best to try and add up the points and understand the rules. Pops kept winning every game which made me more determined. I can still remember the absolute delight of the first time I actually beat him. He just nodded and said, "Well done", but there was a slight smile on his face and a sparkle in his eye. He was a wise man and he'd taught me some of life's lessons without any lecture being necessary. I went home feeling ten feet tall. As with sex Cribbage is best played with two people but can be played by three or four. A pack of cards is needed and a cribbage board to keep score. Pegs fit into holes on the board, with sixty holes each side (two rows of thirty) and one extra hole at each end. We used to play up to 61 or sometimes 121 (twice round the bo
                ard). There is a rule, however, that if either player reaches 61 before his opponent has gained 31, or 121 before his opponent reaches 91, this is called a "lurch" and counts as two games won. You can see why my small brain rattled, but it gets worse! You cut the cards to see who deals first. For some inexplicable reason the lowest cut wins. Six cards are now dealt to each player. The loser of the first game deals the next hand and so on. There are heaps of rules and points flying about for any mis-deals, which I won't bother with here as it would take several hundred words to explain - yes, honestly! OK, so each player has six cards. They look at their cards and discard two, face down. These four cards become known as the 'crib' and now belong to the dealer. They remain hidden until the other cards have been played. The dealer then claims them and scores any points they may contain but, you'll be pleased to know, the non-dealer scores three points for having lost the crib! Please pay attention, there will be questions at the end! After the 'crib' has been made the opponent cuts the pack and the dealer turns over the top card, so it is face up. This is called the 'starter'. If this should be a Jack the dealer scores two points 'for his heels' - don't ask, I have no idea! Now we can start to play this hand. The players have to look out for different combinations of cards such as pairs, triplets, four sequences, runs and where the cards total up to fifteen. Oh yes, you've got to know how to add up to play. I'll tell you how to count the score later, that'll give you something to look forward to! The non dealer lays a card, from his hand, face up in front of him and calls out it's value - picture cards count as ten. The dealer then lays a card, again face up in front of himself, and calls out the combined value of his card and the
                card already laid. This continues - but the value of the 'exposed' cards must not total more than 31. If a player hasn't a card that will keep the value under 31 he calls "Go" and the opponent continues - if possible. The player who gets nearest 31 gains one point but if he makes exactly 31, gets two points. If the score should only reach 15, the last player scores three points. Pegs are moved on the board to keep the score as the game progresses. But there's more! As the cards are laid players look out for the combinations, I mentioned earlier, for more points like: Pairs ~ If a player lays the same card as the previous one e.g. four of spades, following a four of diamonds, he scores two points. Triples ~ If a pair has been laid, as our example above, and the next player can lay another four (clubs or hearts) he will get six points. There are also points to be made for making fifteen (e.g. a seven card followed by an eight) - this gives two points, for sequences, runs and also for a flush (i.e. cards all of the same suit). I won't give all the scoring possibilities, as I can tell you are beginning to wane a little, but no doubt you'll get a rough idea of what it is all about - well perhaps. But there's still even more! When the laying of the cards is finished it's time to add up the points of the four remaining cards, that you were originally dealt. But, this time, also using the 'starter' card that was cut earlier- remember? Again players look for combinations of fifteens, pairs and so on. A player will probably say something along the lines of, "15 two, 15 four, a pairs six and a run of three makes nine". So that would be another nine points to move your pegs on the cribbage board. If you have never played and understood that you must be a member of Mensa at the very least! Ahhh, but of course, don't
                forget - as if you would - the dealer also has his 'crib' cards to add up as well. And the 'nob'? If a player has a Jack of the same suit as the 'starter' card he (or, of course, she) says, "One for his nob". I remember being quite disappointed when someone explained to me that 'nob' actually meant 'head', oh well! Once that hand is over, and all the points done and dusted, it's time to deal again. This goes on and on until a player reaches the agreed total and is therefore declared the winner. So, there you are, that - without getting too involved - is a bit of what Cribbage is all about. I always associate Cribbage with old men, maybe because of my Grandad. He used to go to his local pub to play every Sunday before lunch. Gran would cook a traditional Sunday roast and, magically, he would appear exactly as it was ready to be dished up. After the meal he would go to bed and sleep until tea-time. His father did the same before him, as did his brother. Dear old Pops has now passed on but one Sunday lunch time, shortly before he died, he persuaded me to watch him play Cribbage at his local - quite an honour for a 'woman'! I sat there, with my glass of red wine, feeling completely out of place as all of these old guys played their cards, and so seriously - after all there was money at stake, well coppers. Pops did quite well, supped his pint, smoked his Golden Virginia and gave me the occassional wink when he won. It was like watching something from a bygone age. I'm glad I went though. I'd been allowed into his private world which was more than my Gran had achieved so, yes, I was honoured. I don't play Cribbage now and don't expect I ever will again, it's just a special memory. Mind you, 'one for his nob', remains with me! Bless you Pops. ;-> Kay Question. I did warn you! What would you get if you got hi
                s heels and his nob?

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                  More Comments
                • More +
                  10.09.2001 20:58
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  7 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH MOIST TOIST IS THE BIGGEST WANKER SINCE TUTANKAMOONS MUM ATE HER CARPET WITH BOTH HANDS YESTEDAY UMM KAY NOT USEFULK THEN WORTH

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    10.09.2001 20:56
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    This game uses a standard pack of 52 cards with no jokers and no wild cards. The rules aren't simple but you get used to the order of play after a few games. You can score using a peg board or pen and paper and you usually play up to 61, 101 or 121 points. The game seems to be more popular amongst the older generation but many pubs still have "crib teams" so you could make friends by knowing how to play this game. The can score points on the "pegging", by what you have in your hand and by what you have in your box. The skill comes in the discarding of the card(s) from your hand for the box (a hand in itself that is passed from player to player after each turn) and in the playing of cards during the "Pegging". This game can infuriate a very good player because there is so much luck involved. In the long run the better player will win more games but a run of bad luck cannot be helped much. My boyfriend taught me how to play this about a year ago - I'm quite proud of the fact that "I can play cribbage" now - I must say I'm not bad now and I have bet my bf on several occassions (he says he's proud because he taught me but between you and me :P I think he gets a bit "rattled" when I win - poor thing :-)).

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    01.08.2001 04:24
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    1 Comment

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Cards, matches and a long narrow piece of wood with 60 holes on each side. It looks an easy game, but it is quite difficult. My grandfather wanted me to learn this gameto help keep me quite on my visits. After we got the hang of the game we moved on to chess. I have to say that i really like this game and I was pleased to see that there was a PC version as I do not need to wait for somebody who knows how to play to come along. The object of the game is to move your matches along the full length of your side twice and then back into your starting position. You have two pegs and they leap frog each other as they move around the "board". The cards dictate how many moves you, or your opponenet moves. Each person is dealt 6 cards. You decide which four you will keep and discard the other two. The two cards discarded from each player creates an extra hand, which each person gets in alternative turn. The best score you can get in a turn is 24. For each combination of 15 points you score two moves - thus a King (or another card valued at 10 - 10, Jack, Queen, King) and three fives = 9 points (3 x 15 at 2 points each and three points for three of a kind) If you have a run you get a point for each card. So, if you discard any cards you need to be careful and make sure that what you have left will give you the maximum points. By the time you play this game a few times it can become addictive. The best bit is that it is compact and can be played on the move, or is easily transported and can be taken anywhere to play and is good for all ages. So, if you are on holiday and it starts to rain and the tellly goes on the blink, break out cribbage and before you knowit the night will have gone. Enjoy.

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      16.06.2001 23:18

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      It doesn't need me to start describing this game, it is done very fully by other reviewers. It is the best two-handed card game I know. There is a 4 handed version and at a stretch a 3-handed one (in which players are dealt 5 cards and discard 1, 1 card is dealt into the box), but the classic form is for 2 people. I rarely play "live" these days but have a very good PC version which I got from a cover disc a couple of years ago. It says that it is from Wireplay, but I have searched www.wireplay.co.uk to see if it is downloadable without success. There are some versions on www.CNETdownloads.com (search for Cribbage) including a version for playing on the web, but I'm happy with the one I've got which I play almost daily. There are no skill levels and the computer plays a skillful game - it's all in what you discard and how cannily you play during the first round.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      02.06.2001 09:00

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      I love cribbage. I learned it as I child and have very fond memories o playing it with my family on camping trips when it rained. Cribbage is an easy game to learn so children can play it too. It is good to teach children to count and I find it has helped me in everyday life by keeping my counting skills sharp. Cribbage requires a deck of cards and a counting board. I have played with just cards and a pen and paper in a pinch. There are travel sized cribbage boards that I think avid cribbage plays should not be without. I keep mine in the glove compartment of the car. You never know when you can get a game in. If you have never played this game, find a friend who knows the game and learn a new skill. You will be glad you did.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      15.05.2001 03:12
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      2 Comments

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      Cribbage fans, young and old, experienced or merely starting out in your crib career, look no further for the ultimate guide to cribbage. You can play online, you can play at home, you can play down the pub. You can play for matches, money, drinks, or even my favourite:strip cribbage... Here are the rules, gang (courtesy of www.cribbage.org): Two Person Cribbage The object of the game cribbage is to obtain 121 points before your opponent does. This is accomplished by "pegging" or moving your pegs around the board as you score points. It is also a game where etiquette is important. The rituals associated with cutting and dealing, playing and pegging, as well as the terminology, all serve the useful purpose of keeping things in order - and they help to give the game a flavor of its own. Terms used: Card Values or Pip Values Two players use a standard 52 card pack and the Cards rank from K (high) Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A (low). Cut for Deal The two players each cut a card from a shuffled deck to determine who starts the game as Dealer and Pone (non Dealer), low card wins. If the cards are equal the deck is shuffled and the players cut again. Dealer This is the player dealing the cards for a hand (round) and will have the crib that hand. Pone The player who is dealt to, also the person who is dealt to for the first hand. Dealer and Pone alternate each hand, however, in determining game strategy the first Pone is often referred to as the Pone for the game. In tournament play the Pone cuts the deck before the Dealer deals the hand. The Deal The Dealer alternately deals 6 cards to both the Pone and himself. The Dealer places the remaining deck of cards face down on her side of the table. The Discard Both players discard, face down, 2 of the 6 cards to the Dealer's side of the table. The Starter or Cut Card After the cards have been
                      dealt and the players have contributed to the crib, the Pone cuts the deck and the Dealer turns over the top card of the remaining deck. This is the Start card. The Start card is not used during the play of the hands. The Pone must cut at least 4 cards and must leave at least 4 card during the cut. Card Combinations Points may be obtained by getting various card combinations such as pairs, runs, flushes etc. They are presented with their point value in the table below. The Play or "Pegging" The objective here is two fold... Each player, starting with the Pone, takes turns laying one card on the table. As they do, if they achieve any of the card combinations as shown in the later table, they peg the respective points. In addition, if they reach 31 exactly, they peg 2 points. The complete breakdown of card combinations and points follows. Players announce the total pip value of the cards played by both players and any points scored. The player must peg the points announced prior to playing another card. Players peg by moving the rear peg ahead of the front peg the number of points "holes" scored. The front peg is the players most recent score and the rear peg the previous score. The Crib This refers to four cards that were placed face down on the Dealer's side of the table at the start of a hand of play. They remain face down until the end of the hand at which point they are counted and the points are pegged by the dealer. Possession alternates as the players each takes his or her turn as the dealer. The Show or "Counting the Hand" After the Play, each player counts the points in their hand starting with the Pone, then the Dealer and finally the Dealer's crib. The Start card may be used to add to possible point values. Round A Round is the play of cards during a hand when the players attempt to score points. The round ends when a player scores 31, gets a "G
                      o" for playing the last card of a round without reaching 31, or plays the last card of a hand without reaching 31. Hand A hand consists of one or more Rounds and the Count. At the end of the hand, the points are counted and pegged, and the Pone becomes the Dealer and deals a fresh hand. The new Dealer also get the crib as well. The Cribbage Board A cribbage board is a wooden (plastic, ivory, etc.) board with small holes, in groups of five, drilled into it. The players are represented by pegs that fit in the holes. In any case, each player has two pegs: the forward peg shows the player's score to date, and the rear peg shows the previous score. When a player scores points, the rear peg is moved in front to show "Peg" the new score. That way the distance between the pegs shows the amount most recently scored, and the opponent can thereby check it has been scored correctly. Fine Wood tournament boards as used for ACC tournament are available at SCM Tourney Boards. The Winner The player to peg 121 points or more, first. The Dead Hole The player to peg 120 points exactly is said to be in the "dead" or "stink" hole. If you lose the game in this position you are "left in the stink hole." Skunk A player who loses by more then 30 points is considered to be "skunked", 60 points is double skunked and 90 points is triple skunked. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ -- The Game Sequence: Starting the game The game begins with a shuffle of the cards. Each player cuts a card and the lowest card wins, that person gets the first crib and deals the first hand. The cards are then shuffled by the dealer. After the first hand, the opposite player deals the cards and receives the crib. The dealer and possession of the crib alternates each hand until the game ends. Dealing and the
                      Crib Each player is dealt six cards. They keep four of their choice and discard two cards into the crib on the Dealer's side of the table. The crib remains face down until the end of each hand when the crib points are tallied and added to the dealer's total. The remaining deck is left face down until each player has made their choices for which cards they wish to keep and which cards they want to discard into the crib. The Cut After each player decides which cards they want in their hand & the crib, the Pone cuts the deck and the Start card, or top card of the remaining deck is turned over. If the Start card is a Jack , then the dealer pegs (receives) two points immediately. (Called "Two for his Knob") The Play The object of this part of cribbage is to total the pip values of the cards played to equal 15 or 31 points without going over. Cards are valued by their number except for the face cards (Jack, Queen & King) which are worth ten points. Aces are always valued as "one". The Pone begins by playing the first card to the table, leading. Each player alternately plays a card to the table, announcing the total pip value of the cards played, in turn until 31 is reached. In addition to going to 31, players may also get points for achieving any of the combinations listed below... such as a pair, run or or three of a kind, etc. If a player only has cards in her hand that will exceed 31, then they say "Go" and the other player may use his/her remaining cards to get to 31 and/or to obtain any of the possible card combinations. If both players only have remaining cards that will exceed 31, then the last player to place a card on the table gets one point for "The Go" and the other player begins the next round again until all cards have been used. The person playing the last card not exceeding 31 pegs one point for "Last". The Show or Count After the play comes the Sh
                      ow. Starting with the Pone, his hand of cards is displayed and the results are pegged. Then the dealer displays his/her hand, pegs the points and then turns over the crib and pegs those points. The objective here is to make any of the mentioned card combinations, except 31. The Start card (the face up card on the deck) is used with each player's hand as well as the crib and the scores are pegged accordingly. After the count the Pone becomes the Dealer and shuffles and deals the cards thus beginning the next round and hand. So there we are people, the game of kings. Enjoy...

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        02.01.2001 03:36
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        Cribbage is a very ancient game that is sadly disappearing. All you need to play the game is a deck of standard playing cards and a crib board to keep the score. (If you don't have a board you can still play using a pencil and paper although its quite tedious counting up that way.) You need at least three players but four is more fun. The object of the game is to score points by laying cards which added to the previous ones come to 15,and 31 for the game. You get extra points for pairs, runs, sets of three, etc. This all sounds fairly difficult to play but its not. Once someone who knows the game shows you how it becomes very simple. I have played the game with adults and children as young as seven. The youndsters need a little help sometimes but thats all. If you know someone who can teach you to play this is an excellent game and it would be a pity if it disappeared all together.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        09.12.2000 21:27

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        I remember learning Cribbage when I was a young child. It was a challenging game, but I eventually learned all the rules and played it a lot with my dad. It is a game with a lot of counting and patterns and adding up as well as strategy, and I'm sure it improved my counting and mental math skills no end. It's quick and unforgiving-- if you miss some points from your hand, your opponent can claim them for him/herself. It's rare to find anyone young that can play the game, which is sad. Essentially, each player is dealt six cards. Players try to make the best hand possible with four of the cards, putting the others aside in the 'crib'. The dealer owns the crib and gets to score from it. Then a card is cut, and the players proceed to try and 'peg' points by adding their discards up to 15 or 31. Finally, the players count their hand scores, using the four cards plus the cut card. You score two for each 15, and three for a run. More cards in the run scores more. You can even score 4 or 5 for a flush. The real strategy is planning how to pump up your crib while spiking your opponent's crib.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments