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Digital Cameras in general

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    27 Reviews
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      11.12.2009 15:50
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      What are you waiting for!? Go get one!

      I quite frankly don't know what I did without a digital camera. I currently have a 4 megapixel version, which is a Kodak model from a few years ago, I bought it in Asda for around £30. When I first used a digital camera I couldn't believe the differences to a throw away or 35mm. For those of you who still haven't made the switch (because I still see people with disposables or film loaded cameras) here are some of my top tips when considering purchasing one:

      * You want a good sized screen - so you can see if your pictures are awful or not and delete what you don't want to keep. Mine has a screen about 2 inches wide by 3 inches long. It's more than sufficient, even without my contacts in!
      * Don't be too particular about megapixels unless you are a camera-fanatic, in which case you probably don't need to read on as I am not technically minded whatsoever, so you could give me tips! Megapixels only really improve the picture quality if you have a high quality printer, or you take detailed pics; for your family snaps a 3 / 4 megapixel is sufficient
      * Remember, the internal memory of the camera wont normally hold many pictures, so you will need to purchase an additional memory card. As a rough guide you will get over 200 pictures on a 512MB card using a 4 megapixel camera. Check out this useful web page for more information http://www.crucial.com/support/how_many_pictures.aspx
      * Buy a case and a wrist strap - it may look geeky, but you never know where you're going to end up taking pictures - if you go to the beach or something, you don't want to lose your camera and you want to keep it protected
      * Listen to the advice of the camera shop sales advisor - but don't be swayed; if you ask about a camera and they try to sell you something more expensive, likelihood is they are just trying to get more money out of you
      * A digital camera may cost a lot of money - but you will save so much in the long run, how many times do you get pictures back and they have one of those annoying quality tips stickers? Or you get them back and they have red eye or the picture is ghastly. With a digital camera you only print what you want! Saving you lots of money

      There was an advert on the TV not so long ago about not printing pictures - saying that it was a sin and that people should still print their memories even though they use digital cameras. Well you know, it can be quite expensive, some places, like Boots charge by the print, so for example, a 7 x 5 print could cost you around 30p for one, if you get any less than 49 printed! So printing can be expensive. Putting aside the fact you save by not getting prints which you don't like or aren't great quality, here are some other ideas for you which I use myself:

      * Make disc albums. Rather than printing and filling up albums put the pictures on to disc (dead easy even for us techno-phobes). You can catalogue them and produce nice covers for the case and then you can treasure them just as you would a physical album. I make two of each one. In case the master disc gets a little wear and tear - plus if you fancy a family photo night, you can just pop it in to your DVD player and watch them on the TV! You can take them in to a store and print one or two for frames at any time! Plus, Christmas is coming up and you could even make duplicate copies of albums and give them as gifts
      * Choose only the essence! If you want to fill an album with physical pictures, choose only say 10 from each event or night out. Put them in the album and then stick an envelope in with the disc and the rest of them on it. You can save up say 10 occassions on your memory stick, choose 10 pictures from each, you print a 100 pictures and get a reduced print price and you still don't spend too much
      * Print at home on gloss or matt paper - this is cheaper than you think, particularly when you consider you can make tiny prints and make a scrapbook or collage. You can get smart price / tesco value printing paper and it's dirt cheap
      * Consider a photo printer - the ink can be expensive, but it does last well and saves money in the long run. Plus you just stick your memory card in to the printer like you do in the shops at the Kodak machines - no messing about putting the pictures on to a disc first
      * Buy a digital photo frame - you will enjoy your photos constantly on display and you don't need to pay for one print. Plus you can buy these now for less than £20! And they make an eye catching feature in your room, and a good conversation topic!

      There's a whole world of excitement out there when it comes to digital photography, even for the most technically impaired person! You can get your pictures uploaded on the web and share with family miles away - or get your pictures turned in to gifts like mugs. Its brilliant, I keep mine with me all the time, you never know when you will get a Kodak moment!

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        09.12.2009 18:42
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        Good but not without faults!

        Digital cameras have definitely changed the world of photography. They mean photography is easy to use, photos can be deleted and everyone is taking photographs.

        GOOD POINTS

        There are many good points about Digital Cameras;
        1) You can take 20 pictures of the same thing and then just choose the best two to keep so you are much more likely to catch the scene you want.

        2) Photos can now be deleted and you don`t have to pay to print rubbish photos!

        3) Photography is now simpler and nearly everyone has a camera.

        4) You can take a memory card where ever you want and can show your pictures to your friend or put your card in a machine in the supermarket and print your photos.

        5) More advanced features such as red eye and face detection make photos look even better!

        BAD POINTS

        There are also a couple of bad things about Digital cameras;

        1) You now have hundreds or thousands of photos on your hard drive on your computer and probably look at them twice and you never use them or print them out!

        2) Cameras now get out of date so quickly and often break too!

        Overall Digital Cameras are great but do have some negative points too. They are much better than film but have completely changed the world of photography!

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          09.01.2007 03:41
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          Stylish, clever units and the images produced are manageable for on-line posting and safekeeping

          IT IS NOT TOO LATE to avail the post Xmas bargains for your first camera or having an upgraded unit at the start of the New Year. Looking for a new digital camera is quite a time consuming task – finding the best deals on top of new models in the market (high street and on-line).

          Choosing a digital camera is not simple. It is not easy to pick the best one from the others because each camera user or potential buyer has different requirements, interests and levels of ability to use it. Thus, deciding to get one depends on what you want from the camera and the value for your money. It is still convenient if you have already identified some basic features of the camera that will suit your requirements as an amateur, or professional. Unless otherwise, you don’t have much information and experience to help you decide finding the best fit for your need and interest.

          To make the search easier and rewarding, I identified key fundamental elements and factors to consider in purchasing a digital camera. These are only guides for you where to start in choosing a digital camera and to simplify the buying process, not making it more complicated. Just pick only those elements you think match your choice rather than to prescribing you all and getting overwhelmed with superfluous featured functions.

          Based from my own experience, it is not the sophisticated features of the camera that will make images stunning and likeable, but it will always reflect back to the person’s styles and techniques who took those images that matter. Yes, having an advanced unit will dramatically improve the quality of the photos, but the person behind the camera decides how those subjects will be shot. In other words, it does not really matter what camera you got as long as you have the ‘eye’ to see and shot things differently.

          WITH THIS LIST, I do hope that you could be able to find and decide what camera you like, consequently be able to enjoy what your camera can offer in capturing those memorable moments with your family and friends, those stunning places you visited during your travels; and that will continuously provide extra credibility and stable income for people who do it professionally.


          ~~WHAT DO YOU WANT FROM THE CAMERA?
          What is the main reason why you want to purchase one? If you are under the category of people taking pictures just for ‘fun’ – taking photos during family/friends parties and travels, and don’t care really how cameras work, then I suggest you get the ‘compact’ automatic camera. The digital compact camera can provide better quality photos than captured from a camera mobile phone. This also the right unit if you don’t want extra heavy kit for accessories (tripod, lens, batteries, manual, etc.) and if you already tired of buying films, and photo albums for sake keeping which need extra space in your cabinet. This camera is a cheap and simple point-and-shoot model which does not require sophisticated adjustment and great skill to use it. You can get it between £70-250 varying in size and style. Having this price range, you can get a super slim, waterproof models, and with ultra-zoom features, including having full set of program for shutter and aperture adjustments which could be used for any kind of subjects (landscape, sports, wildlife, etc.). Most of the compact cameras have straightforward ‘auto’ mode for every exposure decision for taking images, and some of them have a range of ‘scene modes’ for portraits, landscapes, night shots, fast moving objects, etc.

          If you are a hobbyist and taking photos from your compact digital camera is not satisfying, then a ‘budget’ digital SLR (single lens reflex) or DSLR is now good for you. For further info on what SLR means, I suggest having it search in the web, but it does not really matter here as long as you can understand the main features for such type of camera. You can get this type of camera from £250-550. The DSLR camera is capable of delivering high-quality results, yet can be as simple to use a compact camera. But the big difference is that this camera is more versatile and creative, thus the images taken are not restricted by the camera itself. You can take any type of photo and the camera can offer the ways and means to do it for you. It is recommended to spend more time to read the instruction manual to minimise frustrations during those important family events that your service is needed most.

          You have already been experienced with film SLR or have decided to move on from budget digital SLR to a camera with more pixels and features, then an ‘enthusiast’ DSLR is good for you. This category of camera offers more functions than you’ll probably ever need, with durable build quality and impressive performance which you could not find in cheaper models. Get one of these models can costs you from £600-1000 (body only, excluding lens). This also gives you the potential to use it for earn extra income from your photographs.

          And finally, if taking photos on a daily basis as your source of income, then it is the right time to have the ‘pro’ or professional DSLR type of camera. This is the professionally specified camera with the latest photographic technology, combined with high-end features and ultra-tough build quality. It also offers shooting speed, processing power and durability, making them ideal for sports and news photographers or for the ‘paparazzi’ people who are always in the move. Because of these various features, you can get it from not less than £1850 (body only, excluding accessories).

          So, before deciding which is best, you first think carefully what type or category of photographer you are. It does not mean that the most suitable camera for you is necessarily the expensive one or the newest model available in the market.


          ~~WHAT IS THE SIZE FOR THE SHOTS?
          Answering this question is by explaining it in terms of ‘megapixel’ which is now becoming a popular rating factor for digital cameras. What is a megapixel? It refers to the number (in million) of pixels that a camera’s image sensor carries – the multiple of the image width and height in pixels which also determines the resolution of the photo. It means that the more pixels in the sensor the greater the level of detail it can record which provide a sharper colour to be achieved.

          In other words, the number of pixels/megapixels in a camera gives the maximum size the image can be printed without distortion or ‘noise’ (graining). To print digital images requires a ratio of 300 pixels per inch (ppi) or dots per inch (dpi) as the easiest way to understand how far you can enlarge your image. For example, a 3 megapixels (3000000 pixels) can produce images measuring 2000x1500 pixels; thus dividing it with 300 ppi, the image could be printed to a 6.5x5 inches size (approximately good for 6x4 inches picture size). For a 6 megapixels camera, it can produce images measuring 3000x2000 pixels or 10x6.5 inches size.

          Therefore, for a 6x4 print, you need at least 1 megapixel, then for letter size (10x8 print), you need at least 7.2 megapixels, and for an A4 size, you need 3510x2490 pixels or 8.7 megapixels camera. But in reality, a good camera having a 3.2 megapixels can print up to A4 print size but it more comfortable to get a 5 megapixels for A4 enlargements. Take note that for having a high resolution camera has to process and save larger image files which means it is slower for saving images and the continuous shooting speed is lower. Thus, larger files also require bigger memory cards which give you additional cost.

          High megapixels are more inclined to ‘enthusiasts’ and ‘pro’ photographers who want to capture a high level of detail. The difference between the 3 megapixels and 7 megapixels is insignificant or negligible when the images are printed out at a standard size (6x4 prints). So don’t be easily impressed with higher pixel rating that a camera has, but check out other specifications. Sometimes a digital camera with a lower pixel rating has a broader and better range of other features and offers the best value for your money.


          ~~WHAT ARE THE FEATURES YOU NEED?
          There are basic function features and specifications that you need for a camera to be more functional. In most cases, the range of functions on digital camera is irresistible and cant be ignored. But some features are more important than others. Here are the main ones to look out for, but it is up for you to decide which suit your need and interest.

          **Lens and Zoom Range. An optical zoom lens is one of the most useful features for the majority of digital cameras. The standard for a compact camera is 3x optical zoom which allows you to magnify your subject three times. Digital zoom is not real zoom but it is an artificial magnification of the image by just ‘expanding’ and ‘cropping’ the photo in the LCD screen that tend image resolution to go down and the quality suffers.

          **Manual/Automatic Mode. All digital cameras offer either an ‘auto’ mode or ‘manual’ mode. A complete automatic mode requires nothing from your except to press the shutter button while the manual mode allows to adjust to change or manually controlling the way your camera exposes a shot (shutter speed and aperture priority). Some cameras have a ‘semi’ program auto mode where automates the exposure settings but allows you to change certain factors. These modes are the key elements in creative digital photography and operate quite similar to the 35mm cameras.

          **LCD screen. Somehow it is also considered in buying a new camera. It is easier to view, compose and play back images in larger LCD screen. It is also beneficial to have LCDs that flip out (similar to my camera now) and swivel (camcorder style) which is good for tricky shooting angles (like taking personal image).

          **Memory Cards and Batteries. This is one of the key considerations for any digital camera. Most of the cameras support either Lithium-ion battery pack or ordinary AA-sized Ni-MH batteries which are rechargeable type. Some of the cameras are not using rechargeable batteries which could mean additional maintenance cost. The common types of memory cards include SD (security digital) format, xD picture card and the memory sticks. The CompactFlash is less common but normally used for DSLR cameras. If you have existing camera, make sure that your new unit is compatible with the old one, or also compatible with your PC/laptop.

          **Others (video mode, size, weight, build and durability)
          Well, almost compact cameras has video mode feature but not popular with DSLRs. The most common movie formats include MPEG, AVI and VGA. Everyone wants to carry a small camera, but more likely they have fewer features and more difficult to use as their controls are smaller and closer together. So, the bigger and heavy ones have larger image sensors which give you better quality and detail. And for build quality and durability, it always goes back to the credibility of the manufacturers, including the materials used for the body and accessories.


          ~~WHAT IS YOUR PURCHASING POWER?
          Generally, digital cameras are grouped according to their megapixel rating. Every step up of megapixels brings sharper images but it cost more money. Again, going back to what kind of photographer you are, there is no need to spend more money if you just need a small camera that provides you better quality images, easy to use and convenient to carry around. As I mentioned earlier, a compact camera will cost you around $70-250, for budget type for hobbyists is between £250-550, and for ‘enthusiast’ type photographers cost you between $600-1000 (body only), and for sophisticated units are not less than £1850 (body only).

          In addition, having it purchased on-line gives you the best price compared it from the high street/retailers. But you don’t have the opportunity to try out the cameras before buying it, even looking their photos sometimes misleading as to their actual size.

          It is easier to return a defective camera to the shop/store than an on-line retailer, including easier access to tips and advice in proper use of the camera. So, even you paid extra pounds, but having the face-to-face assistance from the shop/store is invaluable.

          One more thing to remember is the warranty of the camera. It is unusual for a new camera not to function properly. But it is recommended to check the coverage of the warranty or there is an additional cost for having it upon purchase. For sophisticated and expensive units, it is advisable to get a warranty and you should familiarise with the ‘return policy’ if the camera is not working well.

          And most importantly, some people prefer to buy it abroad (like in the US) to get lower price. Having purchased overseas has some negative implications in terms of bringing it back home for possible import/duty tax charges and warranty coverage. Well, you can avoid paying the tax upon arrival but not declaring it is a good example of ‘smuggling’ which is an illegal act. It’s up for you to decide for whatever negative consequences it might cause you.


          ***FINAL THOUGHTS. There you go… I tried to identify the basic things to consider in buying a new digital camera or having an upgrade of your old unit. It is now your choice to find the best camera that fits your need – either being a hobbyist or professional. If you don’t know much about photography and don’t really bother to learn, then an expensive and complicated camera will not give you better results, thus it will cost you more and will make things complicated. However, if you are the type of person who wants to develop and improve your photographic skills and have extra source of income, then it is worth investing in a sophisticated type of camera and giving you a higher-resolution sensor with longer zoom range.

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            30.04.2006 21:19
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            Fab first camera, dependable, reasonably priced and easy to use

            I like photos, though am not especially skilled at taking them, and as such felt no need to invest in an expensive new camera at any time over the past few years. I had a 35mm that suited me fine, allowed me to produce pictures I was happy with and was not too expensive to run in terms of batteries of film. However a year and a bit ago I was growing quite jealous of my friends’ ability to post pictures from our jaunts on various website, and decided I needed to upgrade to a digital camera. It was about this time last year, and I knew a 4 month trip to Australia was coming up. This presented two conflicting points to consider: on the one hand, I wanted a camera good enough to produce breathtaking snaps of the breathtaking sights I was expecting to see, but on the other hand I knew I would be travelling a lot, and not always staying in 5* hotels or carrying top class luggage. In other words, I didn’t want a camera I would feel too sad about having lost or stolen, letting slip into the sand now and then or, as would inevitably happen, dropping onto hard floors. For this reason I decided to buy, quite simply, the cheapest digital camera that looked halfway decent. Thus, I happened across the VIVITAR 3650.


            PRICE AND AVAILABILITY

            I bought the camera from Bestcameras.co.uk but it is has since become widely available both online and on the high-street – when I was shopping at the weekend I noticed Tesco currently stock it. I paid just under £50 for the camera, though its price has dropped steadily since the time of purchase in April last year.


            STYLE

            I liked this camera as soon as I saw it because it’s not just silver: it has a colourful swish on the front, and the colour of that swish (a metallic blue) happens to be my favourite. The camera fits neatly into the palm of my hand – I’d provide evidence of this but in order to do so I would have to take a photo using said camera, which as you can guess would be slightly tricky. So instead, imagine the hands of a small person (not midget small, just petite) who is female and early 20s, and work out how big or small a camera would have to be to fit therein. However because the camera is shorter than some, and because it still needs to contain all the super, magical photo-taking mechanisms, it ends up being a chunky devil, and not super-light (though at 120g it’s hardly a heavy-weight). It also doesn’t, for example, fit neatly into my back-pocket as some other brands might, nor can I wear it round my neck disguised as something else: this is definitely a camera-shaped camera.

            It is quite stylish, though. Style through minimalism, that’s its motto. The front is part blue and part silver, and holds the flash neatly in one corned above the lens. The top has two discreet buttons (one takes the photo, the other switches it on and off) while the base houses the battery flap and a small round hole, the function of which has not entirely been determine yet. The back has a decent sized viewing screen to line up your pic on (no separate viewfinder on this model), has the ready/not-so-ready light and holds the buttons that you use to manipulate your pic and change settings with. All in all it’s nice and simple, not too many bells and whistles (except that darn hole…what IS it for?) and presented nicely and neatly.


            SPECIFICATIONS AND FUNCTIONALITY

            This is a 3 megapixel camera which means it takes decent, clear photos, but they are not the sharpest available with top of the range cameras. At an operational level, keen amateur photographers are likely to find nothing wrong with the quality of shots this camera produces but if crystal clear clarity is your thing, you’ll already know you need a higher spec. Bearing in mind that the first digicams launched often had only 1 megapixel shots, this one is a significant improvement on the early days of digital photography.

            As well as taking general photos, the camera has the following features:

            · short movie recording (the length depends on the amount of memory you’ve upgrade to as the memory card that comes as standard holds peanuts).
            · A review function that allows you to flick through all the pictures / replay any movies you have made. You can zoom in on these, magnifying them up to x4 but because the screen cannot expand, zooming in means you only see a little of the picture at once
            · The deletion function allows you to delete photos without having to download them onto a computer – very handy if you’re travelling and running out of memory
            · The self-timer allows you to be in the shot you’re taking, by lining it up, clicking the button and then dashing in front of the camera in the 5 or 10 seconds lead-in time you have given it.


            USABILITY

            I find this an extremely easy camera to use, as do most of the strangers who accost me offering to take my photo with it (“Surely you want a shot of yourself flying through the air with the greatest of ease?” one asked cheesily while we were at Trapeze lessons at Sydney Olympic Park). You don’t have to do anything before taking a photo other than turning on the camera, pointing and shooting. There is no need to wind it on, or switch on a flash, or any of those other things people used to do with photo equipment. Reviewing photos is also easy, as is deleting them, though there is a handy safe guard here in case you accidentally click erase, the camera equivalent of a PC’s “Are you sure you wish to permanently delete these files?”

            For me an important feature of any digital camera is its ability to download photos onto a permanent base such as my laptop, and this one does marvellously in this respect. When I first got it I dutifully installed the software and read the instructions, but I soon discovered that none of that was really necessary as in order to get photos from A (the camera) to B (a computer) all you have to do is plug A into a cord (supplied) which then plugs into B, and hey presto, photos start transferring. Most operating systems (from about Windows 2000 onwards) have photo software as standard, so there’s no need for the CD they kindly supply. For this reason I was easily able to download my photos everywhere I went abroad, email them home and keep the family suitably jealous with evidence of my jaunts to rain-forests and chocolate factories, and more rain-forests and chocolate tastings, and even more rain-forests (for the record, I am so over the rain-forest. Truly.) Anyway, it was easy – my computer at work there, internet cafés friends’ laptops – all easily handled my downloads without any bother. Photos downloaded can either be still kept on your camera too (for when you get bored on a train and need something to look at) or deleted en masse (supremely useful for when, like me, you have several thousand on there that you don’t want to click through and delete individually. You can also choose which ones to download each time (perhaps only the new ones you’ve taken, not ones from a few months back you still want to look at on your camera, for example) so you can customize your downloads and subsequent deletions. Hurrah.



            DURABILITY

            The camera came with a 1 year manufacturer’s warranty which I have not needed to call upon. I am very happy with the way the camera has lasted, and it continues to work as well as did when I initially got it. This is despite the few months it spent switching from rain-forest to beach and back to rain-forest, and also despite the occasional splash of seawater it took. As I suspected, the inevitable day of dropping came, and the camera slipped out of my hands somewhere in the Olympic Park….and bounced on the grass. I picked it up and couldn’t find so much as a scratch upon it. So far so good. A few weeks later, it fell again, and this time showed evidence of my careless handling. The underside of the camera where you fit the batteries now had a scratch across it and, perhaps more crucially, was slightly ajar. This was 6 months ago, and although the area will still not remain closed, no matter how much I coax it, the incident has had no detrimental effect on the quality of the snaps produced. It looks a bit funny, and others taking photos for me always seem a little cautious, but the vital part – its photo-taking abilities – has not been compromised. I don’t fault the camera for splitting in this way as I’m not the most careful person in the world, and it’s not the first camera that has suffered as a result. If anything, I commend it for its durability in coping with whatever I throw at it, or throw it at as the case may be.


            FINAL WORD

            This is my first venture into the foray of digital photography and I am supremely impressed. I now have a few dozen albums of beautiful photos that were no hassle at all to generate, at very little cost (the camera, that is, my trip was slightly more). This camera is perfect for me because it is simple enough to be able to use immediately without wasting valuable time reading handbooks, but is sophisticated enough to produce good quality shots that will be the prompt for many happy memories for years to come. I have no need for the extras some may feel it is lacking (a view-finder for those who can’t get their head around screens, for example, or a higher megapix rating) and therefore can award it nothing less than full marks. If only all techy gadgets were this user friendly, durable and down-right adorable,


            This camera’s full specs can be found at:

            http://www.vivitar.co.uk/cameras/3megapixel/vivicam3785/

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            • More +
              30.03.2006 21:13
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              ease of use stylish and all together good value for money

              I have had this camera for a few months now and what a turnaround for me. I took a gamble on upgrading from my Kodak Easyshare CX4230 to this beast and haqven't looked back. It was quite a step for me but when you have a go with this beauty you will be impressed.I found that the best way to start with it is use in auto mode then have a play around with the photography mode. I found that a great advantage is being able to have two media storage cards in it, so you will never run out of space while snapping on your hols. With the wapping 9 megapixel resolution you will be able to take some class pictures and blow them up as big as you like. I usually use mine in 5 megapixel mode and the pictures are great. This also has a raw mode but beware raw mode will eat up your storage space like a demented pac-man. All in all this camera i a great introduction to dslr without the major expense of extra lenses and dust problems ( the lense is fixed to the body) it's lovely to handle and easy to use. It also has a video mode and lot's of other little goodies. If you really want to get into photography I would recommend this camera as a very good starter. A full review and spec is available from the fuji website at www.fujifilm.co.uk Check it out and enjoy!

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                27.03.2006 12:42
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                Very easy to use, easy to understand functions

                We all love a good photo, I know I do. So when I decided to buy a digital camera I didn't know which sort to get. I wanted a simple to use and inexpensive camera and after searching around a few places I came across the Olympus FE-100.

                The Camera
                ==========
                The Olympus FE-100 Digital Camera which is Silver is very small and compact but also very cheap. It has got a built in help menu, 6 shooting modes and can be connected to your computer.

                It's Features
                =========
                Pixels
                ''''''''''''''''
                I've never really understood what the pixels etc mean so I cant really go into full detail about the but This Olympus FE-100 has got 4.0 mega pixels.

                Zoom
                '''''''''''''''
                I love the zoom on a camera, is great. When you want to capture that special moment but cant quite see the image as it too far away just hit zoom and there you have it the perfect picture ready to take. This camera zooms in 11x in total for a much closer picture. It has also got a 2.8x optical zoom.

                Built in help guide
                '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                When I first came to use my camera I was worried that I wouldn't understand what each function meant but this was not a problem for me when I did come to take a photo. Pressing each function button brings up a very brief description explaining what each one means. I found this very helpful and very effective, as I was able to use it to help me use the right function not forgetting the best function for every photo I took.

                One Touch
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                What one touch means, is that when coming to sake a photo you don't have to press the shoot button numerous times to take a photo, you just have to press it once. I find this a very very useful feature because is helps me to take photos much faster. The one touch button can be used for most of the cameras features including delete which I personally don't find very useful as I have done, once or twice pressed the delete button without realising and then pressed the wrong one touch button in which case deleted a photo I had taken.

                6 modes
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''
                There are six shooting modes on this camera which I think is great, it helps you to take the perfect picture.
                1) Firstly there is Portrait, this shooting mode is great for taking most photos.
                2) Landscape, This shooting mode is best to use when taking photos of outdoor things,
                3) Night Scene is really good. When set to night scene the camera automatically sets its self to to see in the dark helping take that night time photo.
                4) Self Portrait can be used to take photo's of yourself, very easily
                5) P-auto is a shooting mode that can be used to take photo's automatically itself with in a time limit of 12 seconds.
                6) Movie, now I think this is a great shooting mode. You can record and capture anything for up to about a minute and then play them back.

                Computer Connection
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                Thanks to all the new technology around today printing my pictures is great and my Olympus FE-100 makes it even better. I can connect it to my home PC through the Olympus software and send all my pictures and movies to anyone.
                Connecting your camera to your PC is really easy, you are given an installation disk, a USB cable and a video cable. Once the cables are connected and you have inserted your disk in your computer you will be given a few very easy step-by-step instructions to help you correctly install and use your camera.
                The required requirements for you camera to run and load smoothly onto your PC are Windows 98Second Edition 2000 professional Windows Millennium Edition, Windows XP, Mac 10.2 and higher.

                Flash
                '''''''''''''''
                I have found that with a few digital cameras that I have come across, red-eye is a problem. That's 1 of the things I had to think about before buying this camera but the Olympus FE-100 has actually got a built in flash that can be set to auto, for low light and backlit pictures. Fill-inn which helps brighten those pictures that are too dark, Red-eye reduction stopping eyes reflection turning red. or Off, simply with no flash at all.

                Memory Card
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                The Olympus FE-100 actually has 28 mb of internal memory, but you can also add your own memory card, an x-D Picture card to take and store more photos

                Connection holes
                '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                The camera actually has three holes for cable connections. One for the USB cable to connect to the computer, a video out cable and a DC input cable of 3.4v

                Size and weight
                '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                The camera is very small and handy. I was worried a first that the buttons would be too small to touch but I was wrong, they are the perfect size. Any smaller would have been too small and any bigger would have been much too big.

                It actually weighs 4.9 oz or 140g that's is without the battery and the extra memory card. And its Dimensions are 87.5mm in width, 62.5mm in height and 38.5mm in diameter. Over all very small and compact.

                Power
                '''''''''''''''''
                For your Olympus FE-100 camera to work just add 2x AA Alkaline batteries into the base of the camera and switch on.
                A DC adaptor can also be used but obviously not to walk around with, as it will be plugged in.

                Instruction Manual
                ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
                I found the Instruction Manual very easy to follow and understand. It didn't just have pages full of writing it also has pictures explaining what each button and feature means making it very easy to follow.

                What's in the box?
                ==============
                When buying the Olympus FE-100 you will receive in the box, the Camera itself, a USB cable, a wrist strap, a video cable, 2x AA Alkaline batteries, Instruction Manual, a quick start guide, the OLYMPUS Master Software CD-ROM and last but not least a Warranty Card.


                My Overall Opinion
                ==============
                The Olympus FE-100 in my opinion is fantastic for what I needed. It is a very small and stylish sliver digital camera that I find very easy to use. The use of functions are easy, once I had used them one, I knew what each function meant and how to use it. Every photo I have taken and printed have come out brilliantly, the picture quality is amazing. I found the wide range of features very helpful. I really didn't want a camera that was big and bulky so when I see the size and weight of this one I was really impressed.

                The overall look and design is set out really well. All the features are close to each other making navigation very easy, plus there is a little picture giving you an idea of which function you need to be using for each picture you take. As I stated above, the Built-in Help guide was also another very easy to use and very very helpful feature. When you're out and about and have not got the Instruction Manual with you it gives you a brief description of what certain functions mean.

                I have had my camera just over 3 months and so far I can honestly say I have had no trouble with it. But with the warranty card I am reassured that if anything does got wrong with it I can always take it back.

                This is a perfect little digital camera and very cheap for what it is, it does exactly the same as most cameras but for a fraction of the price.

                Recommendation
                ==============
                Ok, before you buy a digital camera there are a few things you need to ask yourself.
                1) Q~ DO I WANT AN EXPENSIVE CAMERA?
                A~ Not if I can get all the same features of an expensive camera for less.

                2) Q~ DO I WANT A HARD TO USE CAMERA?
                A ~ Not if I can get an easy to use camera that I can really get on with.

                3) Q~ DO I WANT A BIG AND HEAVY CAMREA?
                A~ Not if I can get a reasonable priced camera that is small, compact and a great design.

                Ok, they are just a few questions you might need to ask yourself. If most of your answers were No then I defiantly recommend this Camera to you. It is cheap, reliable, easy to use, small, compact and is very stylish.

                Where to buy?
                ===========
                Olympus UK Ltd.
                2-8 Honduras Street
                London EC1Y 0TX

                Tel. +44 207 253 2772
                Fax +44 207 251 6330
                Email info@olympus.uk.com
                Website www.olympus.co.uk Product Areas:
                Digital Cameras
                Film Cameras

                OR

                http://www.amazon.co.uk

                This Camera is being sold by the above Amazon Link for just £79.99


                Thanks for reading, if I have missed anything out please contact me and I will happily edit..


                Many Thanks Emma xx

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                  27.07.2005 14:16
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                  Great camera for a child

                  I won this in a Clearasil competition a couple of years ago. For what it is, it's a brilliant little digital camera. I recommend it for little children and older people. It's so easy to use. It's press the mode button and click away.

                  Waitec Caddy 03 is compact and very light. It easily fits into your pocket or handbag. It comes with a nifty black cover to protect. It looks like a normal film camera but it's digital camera. It's power by two AAA batteries. The only colour it came in was blue with a touch of silver to trim it off.

                  It has a built in memory of 8MB which takes up to 70/200 photos but in reality, the best I could get out of it was upto 60 because the quality on the 352 x 288 pixels photos were just not worth taking. 60 photos may not be a lot for a digital camera but for the time it was made and also the cheapness of the camera; you can't expect the world from it.

                  It has a hole at the bottom of it so you can put it on a stand, which came with the camera. It has a carrying strap on the left side of the camera and on the right is the USB port to your PC, which is covered with a bit of plastic that protects it.

                  Above the USB port, there's a switch button. With a small picture of a mountain and person and flower for the different focuses you want.

                  On the back of the camera, there's a slot to put your AAA batteries but if you take them out you will lose all your pictures that you have taken so remember to download your pictures onto the PC before you take the batteries out. I learned the hard way. You will have to replace them about every 6 months because that's how long they lasted with me but it really depends on how much you use the camera.

                  Then there's the mode button to turn the camera on. It switches itself off automatically if not used after about 5 minutes.
                  There's little screen next to the viewer so you can see what mode you're on.
                  The different modes, you can have is for taking photos, AVI and the PC mode. AVI mode was interesting because you could take 30 images per second and it would make it into a little video. Also the camera has a self timer of 10 seconds wait.

                  The camera comes with Waitec software drivers on a CD. Just pop the CD in and then just follow the instructions on the screen and then connect the camera to the PC using the USB lead that is also in included in the box. These drivers were compatitably with my Windows 95 at the time. Now they have updated the drivers to make it work on Windows 98/ME/2000/XP if there was any problems with compatitably of the camera when you upgraded your Windows or got a new computer. These new drivers can be found on the waitec website. http://www.waitec.com > support > drivers
                  The software to manipulate and download the images was good and could be used with other digital cameras.

                  Quality of the photos
                  352 x 288
                  640 x 480

                  The 640 x 480 is the best setting to use it on. I think you can tell the difference. 352 x 288 is more grainy and less clear than the 640 x 480.

                  It came with a two year guarantee but I never had any problems with it whatsoever. Unfortunately, this camera is no longer available in the normal high street shops as it is quite an old camera but you can find the Caddy 03 and similar Caddy models to this one on Ebay starting from £1 - 5 or 1.99 euro.
                  All in all it's a lovely camera to start off with.

                  Dimensions

                  Width 3.43 inches / 8.7 cm
                  Depth 0.96 inches / 2.5 cm
                  Height 2.32 inches /5.9 cm
                  Height 0.17 lb / 75 g

                  Features of the camera

                  Lens

                  Focus Range 35.43 inches / 90cm to Infinity (w)
                  Macro Focus Range 9.84 - 13.78 in / 25-30cm (w)
                  Focal Length 6.3 mm
                  Image Resolutions 352 x 288 or 640 x 480 pixels (0.3 megapixel)
                  Compression Type BITMAP
                  Aperture Range f2 (w)
                  White Balance Auto

                  In the box came:

                  The camera
                  USB cable
                  A stand
                  A cover for the camera
                  Manual and CD for the software

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                    04.06.2005 17:10
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                    My little Digital Camera.
                    I recently won a neat little digital camera in a competition.
                    Useful for taking pictures and and sending them to my friends in the Uk and abroad .
                    It slips into the side pocket of my shoulderbag so I can take it wherever I travel conveniently.
                    1.It plugs into a lead in the side of my computer,I had to purchase this attachment then all I do is :
                    2.Clickstill camera logo,3.click still camera software.
                    4.Up comes a gallery.
                    5.then I click on a red and yellow button.
                    the photos recieve a red border.
                    6.then I go to a small button click, name, and save.,double click on this one.
                    Then all I have to do is go to my saved documents and select one by one from my list ,right and left click when I send as an e mail .
                    if I want to view them first I just click once.
                    Then I delete films just taken off my little camera just keep clicking til a junk box comes up on the window.then i am ready to start tking pictures again.
                    All I have to do otherwise is in sert a tiny battery when it has run out .
                    Made in China this Digital Camera has 352x288 pixels.
                    Its compatible with microsoft windows98SE/ME/2000or XP
                    Pentium11333Mhzor equivelant processor USB port.
                    For Machintosh User:power PC processor
                    Mac Os version9.0 9.2
                    USB port. I am having fun taking and sending my pictures.

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                      31.12.2002 15:59
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                      Having recently bought a digital camera for about £200, I was constantly given the same advice by people who had been stung by extra costs so I thought I'd write a short opinion on the good advice I was given. The main initial cost, other than the camera its self, is the memory card. You are usually given a 8 or 16 Mb card but within a few uses of your new camera most people want to upgrade it. Here's where it can get expensive if the memory is specific to the manufacturer of the camera. A friend bought a Sony camera and ended up paying quite a lot over the odds for a 128 Mb memory pack. When choosing a camera, I would stick to Compact Flash or Smart Media as these are industry standard and hence fairly cheap. Its also worth mentioning that its worth hunting around on the web as the shop with the cheapest camera of your choice doesn't nesessally mean that it has cheapest memory. Memory is the size and weight of a folded postit note so many shops offer free postage. Rechargable batteries don't last for ever and digital camera batteries are no exception. Again, try to go for a camera that has standard AA bateries. This means that you can get standard rechargable batteries and replace them cheaply but, more importantly, you can keep a spare set with you without it costing the earth. One thing I got caught out with was the cost of a case for my camera. It wasn't supplied as standard and when I looked it up later it was £30! Quite a lot for a case so I got a perfectly good standard one from a high street store for £6. Make sure you take your camera with you when buying a case to ensure it fits snuggly. All in all, its the extras that cost for budget digital cameras and could quite easily add 50% to your total expenditure if your not careful. Take heed of this advice and you could save your wallet the pain later on.

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                        02.11.2002 03:37
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                        • "2 mins - 1/1600 "

                        Film cameras are upwards of 12million pixels? The digital camera instruction manuals are not user friendly - you need a chapter with a crash course in handling an SLR camera to understand their capabilities. BUT - digitals 1. No developing cost -delete unwanted pics; save and manipulate and print 2. E-mail to friends 3. Portable diary with audio/video capability 4. quality good 5. Put on presentations -powerpoint. put on your website. 6. On-line chat - images 7. the new art form - all have some basic art show prog - or get photoshop 8. smashing hi-tech - dump your film thing now

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                          11.10.2002 13:36
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                          I make no apologies for placing this here. it relates to IBM Microdrives which, in many cases can be used as a direct replacement for the Compact Flash card, one of the most popular means of storing digital photos in your camera. SO JUST WHAT IS AN IBM MICRODRIVE, APART FROM A SMALL DRIVE MADE BY IBM? The Microdrive really is a minute hard disk drive approximately 1" or so square and of After Eight Mint-like thickness. It doesn't actually rotate and hum continuously like its 3.5" brothers, preferring to be stirred into action as and when needed, rather more like a sealed-in floppy disk. It does however still contain an electric motor, the "pros and cons" of which I'll discuss later. It is currently available in three storage sizes, which do not alter its physical dimensions, I might add. The capacities being 340 Megabyte, 512 Megabyte and current big brother, 1.0 Gigabyte! Oh no, not another format war on the brink, I hear you cry. Worry not, IBM have given a lot of thought to that. If those dimensions I mentioned earlier sound familiar, it's because these drives are designed to be "bunged in the same 'ole" as Compact Flash II modules, one of the front-runners in digital camera storage. This makes them immediately useful to most people whose kit is intended for CF II memory chips. There are one or two exceptions, and it's best to check that yours actually SAYS it's configured for the IBM's as well as CF II. Of course, it's not just digital cameras that can now benefit from the serious capacity afforded by Microdrives. Some PDA's are now using them, as is my MP3 player. THE COMPETITION Currently, nothing else comes close to the 1.0 Gigabyte model, although I note that 512 Megabyte CF II chips can now be got. Price-wise, not a lot comes close though, since the BIG CF II chips are pretty expensive in a "pence per Megabyte"
                          kind of way. The top end Microdrive weighs in at around 40p per Megaybte. USING THAT CAPACITY My current digital camera, a Casio with 3.34 mega pixel capacity is my main use for my pair of 340 Megabyte Microdrives. A year ago, these cost me more than I care to mention here, but heh, that's the way of things, right? Even at top definition, the Casio creates 1.3 megabyte JPEG files, which gives me a massive 225 shots per drive, before swapping them over, and a 5 week tour of OZ last year proved this. I'm still wading through the 450 shots, trimming, re-aligning and turning them into a PowerPoint album, but that?s another story. Always a sucker for a new gadget, I hanker after the new Nikon Coolpix 5700. This accepts CF II/Microdrives too - hmmm, what a coincidence! However, the Nikon's 5-megapixel capacity and different amount of JPEG compression means that my 340 Megabyte jobs will "only" handle 138 shots at "top whack" but still more than enough to bore the pants off even the hardiest vicarious person. DRAWBACKS a) Possibly the worst feature of the Microdrive is precisely that they ARE hard drives, with that electric motor in them, that I mentioned earlier. This leads to higher battery consumption than you would expect to get from a CF II module, which are of course solid-state. So your are left with a dilemma, whether to go for the outright capacity of a 1.0 Gigabyte Microdrive, and worry about your battery life all afternoon, or buy the 512 Megabyte CF II module for even more money and less capacity, but not have to worry so much about your batteries! Tricky! b) The electric motor "thing" could also point to their being less reliable, but all I can say is that I've had two for a year or so now, and they've been fine. c) Without checking the full facts out first, I bought a Sandisk CF card reader for ease of use when downloading
                          shots to PC. No problems were experienced when downloading, but try to access the drives from Windows Explorer for anything else, like reformatting them, and you will be met with resistance. Whether the USB-linked Sandisk isn't up to driving all that continuous file activity, or whether it doesn't have a full pin-out to write to Microdrives is anyone's guess. It just goes to reinforce what I said about checking for FULL compatibility. ACCESSORIES If bought separately, i.e. not bundled with the camera, the drives often come with a PCMCIA card adapter, which means that the drives can be inserted into a laptop and operated as any other hard drive. You get a floppy of drivers to complete this particular set-up, and it seems to work just fine on my wife's laptop. The drives come in a sturdy plastic pocket case for transit. PRICES These range from around £111 for the smallest to a shade over £200 for the largest. Still cheaper than the very largest CF II card, and twice the size! The PCMCIA adapter can be had for £15 at Dabs.com

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                            08.10.2002 18:39
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                            Digital cameras are gathering a big share of photography market from their optical cousins, as the technology advances and the prices become more affordable. Set a budget, and make a shortlist of possibles. There are so many cameras available from £30 to £1,000 that a handful should be around your benchmark price, leaving you no shortage of choice. Several hundred pounds will get you a camera of sufficient quality to print out your prized snaps, and if you use a good printer to boot, only the more discernible eye will spot the tell-tale pixellation that digital imaging is prone to. Perhaps the greatest advantage of the digital camera is the development options available. Memory cards are now sufficiently cheap to promote almost endless picture taking if need be, and coupled with the omni-present instant delete function you will be hard pressed to fill more than one or two cards even on a good resolution setting. This facility is great for the trigger happy snapper or equally the more cautious type who doesn't want to waste film. For those pictures that you want to keep a range of storage possibilities exists. Keeping the photos on the memory card is not recommended, as there is far more space available on your computer. Virtually all digital cameras are sold with necessary leads and software to enable you to quickly transfer photos onto your hard drive. From there you can print them out yourself, editing the images as required and defining size and quality parameters. A number of etailers now offer a service whereby you can email your photos and they will be snail-mailed back to your specifications, for comparatively little cost. For more permanent storage a CD writer allows several hundred photos to be placed on disc. I personally drop my better photos onto a CD and view them on my television through my dvd player. This is a great way to keep images, as multiple copies can be produced for friends and family, and a viewing
                            session is made more bearable by allowing everyone to see the pictures at once, rather than passing an album around the room, letting all and sundry leave fingerprints all over your pictures. There are however, limitations that must be acknowledged in owning a digital camera. Battery life is a common complaint, and nothing is more frustrating than lining up the ideal shot before realising that the flash has run out of steam. A rechargeable unit is really the only option, and carrying a spare battery avoids disappointment. Before you choose your camera, do some research into the longevity of your shortlist - some brands are significantly better than others. Image quality is also an issue for many, especially those who like to print out their photos. Whilst the technology is advancing, a traditional camera will still produce a superior image. As a very rough guide, an image of 4 megapixels or more is likely to return an image decent enough to print. Overuse of a digital zoom function will degrade your image, so care must be taken when framing a subject, or resizing and cropping the finished article with software. I understand that the latest offerings from the electronic giants are approaching 14 - 15 megapixels, although these cameras are not yet commercially available, it is surely only a matter of time. To conclude: for the more casual snapper, the upsides of owning a digital camera probably outweigh the inherent problems that exist. But for the more seasoned photographer, don't replace that SLR camera just yet. If portability and processing costs are not an issue, then the benefits of the digital option are less attractive. However, the affordability may well convince you to have both. Now that digital imaging has landed on mobile telephones, it looks like it is here to stay. Website index; for further information and advice, I recommend that the following pages are worth a browse: www.digital-camera-now.
                            com www.digital-camerastore.com

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                              03.06.2002 15:13
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                              I have a Trust Spy@cam fun camera, which for what it is is very good. It works well, and gives expected results. On this basis I was offered a Family@cam 500 for some item I was swapping. The spec. was 3.3 megapixel, whcih appealed to me. After "playing" with it I decided to compare results with my Kodak DC215 (circa 1 megapixel). Results - very dissappointing. The resolution is no better, in fact I am sure it does not look as good. The camera itself is basic - with fixed focus 10mm/F3, that seems fine as the auto flash function. The ability to make AVI clips also works well. Bundled software is Ulead Photoexpress 4.0, and Ulead Video Express, I have no comments here as I prefer to use other imaging software which I am familiar with for many years. The memory is internal and connects via USB port, up to a 100 pictures at Hi res seem the norm, this can vary depending on content. I tried to download the Win XP drivers from Trust website but it bombs out when trying to log in for this product, even though I am registered with other products from them. Operation of the camera is simple and explained in the manual, although a picture and explanation of the LCD panel would benefit some users, there is none. In general, I feel that this camera is not for the serious user, more a snapper when out on the beach.

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                                27.04.2002 22:00

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                                great all round performer - Advantages: can delete unwanted pics, transfer and view quick n easy, no film to load - Disadvantages: none

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                                25.03.2002 20:25
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                                We hear of many instances of inadequate service from leading manufacturers and firms, so I'm delighted to hand out some praise for a change. In late January I acquired a Minolta Dimage E203 digital camera at the bargain price of £199.99, some £150 less than being charged in some other outlets. It's a 2.1 million pixels camera with a 3x zoom lens, 2x digital zoom, an extensive range of modes including various flash settings, TFT screen, three resolution settings and the use of tiny Secure Digital/MultiMedia Card memory cards enabling the overall size to be kept very compact. Photographs taken so far have proved to be sharp, bright and with clean, accurate colours. Initially, because it never seemed to stop raining in February I hardly used it, apart from some indoor test shots, but noticed that the zoom lens sometimes refused to extend or retract when the camera was switched on or off. Over the next few weeks this problem became worse, so much so that last Tuesday I decided to send it back to Minolta's Milton Keynes repair centre. I rang first and was informed there was a 48-hour turnround on camera repairs. This morning I rang to check on the repairs progress and was informed that the technician was having difficulty in sorting out the camera. However the lady I spoke to stated she would request that the camera be completed and sent out tonight, so that I would receive it tomorrow. A few minutes later the phone rang and the same lady spoke to me. She said that since speaking to me she had been informed that Minolta had decided to replace my camera with a brand new one. However, because it had to come from another department, it could not be sent out today and therefore not reach me until Wednesday. She added that she wanted to ensure that I did not wait in tomorrow unnecessarily. I expressed my grateful thanks for Minolta's action and for her taking the trouble t
                                o let me know what was happening. This is what I call service with a capital "S". It's something that some other manufacturers and retailers could study and emulate - certainly I will broadcast Minolta's goodwill gesture far and wide, as well as purchase their products again in the future.

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