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"Home or Away? Where's best to live..."

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      20.04.2009 22:49
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      Try living the dream in Devon

      Like alot of people from the industrial Midlands I always longed to live somewhere away from the city. The seaside has a special magic for people who need to travel at least three hours to reach a decent beach, so it was my dream to live at the sea.

      Well about twelve years ago it seemed the ideal time to move, it just fitted in with work and family commitments so we decided to go for it. To be honest we did have a safety net, our house was bought and paid for so we decided to let it out and buy another house on the coast. If we didn't settle after a reasonable time we would just go back!

      So after much trial and tribulation (I hate house hunting) we arrived here in sunny South Devon.

      Has it lived up to our expectations? You bet it has. When I drop my youngest off at school I drive along the coast, the view is still magical to me, we did worry that it would just become ordinary after a while but it never has. I then drive to work, Dartmoor opens up in front of me, I cross the Dart and arrive at my office. I knew I wanted to stay forever but the rest of the family were more cautious. After two years the house in the midlands was sold and we were here to stay.

      Are there any drawback? Not really, sometimes it can get a bit hectic with visitors but it is lovely to see everyone. If someone is ill it can be difficult. When my mother was very ill I seemed to spend all my time driving up and down the M5. At least it is possible to get back to family in a few hours, not as if we are in Australia.

      When I visit family it doesn't feel like home anymore, Devon's home now.

      Highlights - when the children were younger picking them up from school and taking a picnic to the beach, summers when every weekend is like a holiday, being part of a small but busy community.
      Enjoying the changes - the winter when the beach and town are ours. The run up to Easter when businesses are preparing for the visitors. High season when the town is buzzing and shops are open till all hours. Autumn and its getting quiet again, the town and beach are ours again.

      Regrets? No, not one.

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        04.06.2008 10:21

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        Essay

        I am a married man, and I am living away from my family because I have to complete my study . I supposed to be living with my family, I used to travel abroad I visit different country , I someime left my family behind while I have work mission; however, I have never lived far from my family for long time . This is the longest time I have spent away from home since I came to the United States for studying the English language . really the differences between living with my family and living lonely are very striking . the deem facile different is the food , when I am far away from my home I usually used to eat at the restaurant alone where the food isn't tastes as delicious as at my home , and because of that I dislike to eat some time not eat healthily .
        On the other hand myf amily miss me as a support , I am alawys when anyone need help or getting sick or have problem at school a helper , I am the responsible for my family and I am a family provider , but now not more I am living away from them . I suffer when I know one of my children sick or having a problem .
        realy living away from home very hard, and need to be forbearing . Although I am missing to see my family , and end this suffering soon .

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        20.09.2001 02:11
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        Thousands of young people leave home each September for University, but there are also thousands who stay at home...so which is the best option? First off, I will say that this may become a slightly bias opinion as I left my family in Scotland to take up my place at Durham Uni. I never even considered living at home - in fact, I purposely applied to Universities in Northern England because I considered this to a decent enough distance to move...close enough to go home if there was a problem but I would never be bringing my washing home each weekend. As far as I can see, three are 3 types of student - the ones that live at home, the ones that live away from home but come home every weekend and the ones that leave altogether. For some students, there is no option; the only way to afford a University education is to live at home. And good for them becasue it can't be easy struggling financially and trying to study for a degree. Living at home I'm sure has it's advantages in terms of expense and comfort among other things, but in my opinion, half of University is living away from home and for the first time standing on your own two feet (albeit with the help and guidance from the uni). So if you do have to opportunity to leave home then I say 'Go for it!' I'm sure that no matter how hard these students try, they inevitably will miss out on things socially, but I'm sure they have ample time for studying and catching up with old school friends - although the travelling may be stressful and annoying. Living away from home is excellant - you can be your own boss! I get on very well with my family but I have to say, it is nice to go out and not worry about what time in the morning you crash home! Living away from home does have it's bad points though - it can be expensive and quite daunting to start with...but to be honest it is an experience no student should graduate without. In my
        opinion, living away from home is far better...suddenly you'll really appreciate how much your mum does for you!! Quite often students are flung in at the deep end and that's the best way...sink or swim. You learn how to manage your finances properly, learn to do your own washing and maybe even learn to cook something a bit more exciting than a Microwave lasagne!! But also this is where students can easily go astray without someone 'checking up on them'! There is a balance to be struck between work and play - but you must also fit in all those irritating things like shopping and ironing! Some are more successful than others. The students who live at Uni but go homw every weekend may find that they spend too much time between the two places. Weekends are when students in Hall really pull together...generally weekends are quite in terms of big nights out, but this is where looses ends are tied up, where spare half hours are spent kicking a foot about, when there is chance to catch up on the gossip and if you are away every weekend you miss all this. I do have quite a few weekends away from Uni (visiting boyfriend or cross country running), but I find, the few weekends I do have in Hall are vital and this is when many of the best friendships are forged. The best solution I think is go to Uni about 3 hours from you home (like me!) and then when you need to escape, you can have a nice relaxing weekend at home - but there is sufficient distance there to prevent it becoming a weekly habit! Remember 3 (or 4) years is not a long time and you really have to make the most of it. One other point - don't pick the location of your Uni based on where your boy/girlfriend will be...I had friends who chose to live at home because their boyfrinds were still at school - things didn't go so well and the girls began to resent the boys! Long distance relationships do work (my boyfriend studies in Aberdeen and I'm in D
        urham most of the time and we've been going out for more than 2 years!) Also give up your jod at home if you decide to leave for Uni but come home each weekend to work - this becomes very stressful indeed...you'd be better to investigate the employment options in you town of Uni. This way you are not tied to coming home each weekend if plans change. Slightly off the point but one of the many aspects that need careful consideration before finally deciding to live at home or go away to study. Having read through all my arguments, I realise there are some very good points for and against the three lifestyles...I suppose everyone is different and to really decide you must know exactly what you want from your time at Uni. What ever you choose, I am sure you will have fun!

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        30.07.2001 19:11
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        It's your first week at university. This is different from the first time you went to school, or college, because, for the first time (well, for most people) not only are these people that you're meeting going to be your friends, colleagues, occassional partners and future rivals, if you've decided that you're not living at home, they're going to be your housemates. A lot of people will leave home for the first time when going to university. The whole idea of being an adult, and finally striking out on your own is both exciting and scary. After all, without mum around, who's going to do all your washing, and pick everything up after you? You've got to do it all yourself. Don't you wish you'd listened when she was explaining how washing machines actually work? Now, both ways of uni life have their advantages and disadvantages. For starters, living with your parents is far cheaper, what with having no (or at least little) rent to pay, all bills taken care of and as much free food as you like. On the other hand, you will have to put up with your parents still knowing, just as they did when you were 15, what you're doing, when you're doing it, and with how many people you're doing it(!) Plus, let's not forget that when you're still at home, there's "absolutely no reason why you shouldn't bring your friends round, I'd like to meet them, but I suppose we're not good enough for you anymore, is that it?" You get the picture. Of course, there are other advantages to taking the stay at home route - you are the undisputed knowledge king, having lived in the area already, and people will flock to you to find out where's the best places to go, and what to see and do. And then there's always the possibility of giving a guided tour to the good-looking redhead... However, most people choose not to stay in their home town. University is a chance to spread you
        r wings and leave the little backwater where you were forced to grow up, and move somewhere where people are interesting, and where you don't know everyone, and aren't still stigmatised by "what you did with that dog when you were 7". The obvious disadvantage to living away from home is the cost. Although student loans are higher if you will be living away from home, it is not by enough to cover an entire years worth of extra cost. Which means a job will be neccessary, but that's not good, cos it cuts down on study time AND party time. Added to that the fact that jobs are pretty much impossible to get, and you have a slight problem. Thank heavens then for food parcels from home, and the lovely people at the banks hard-working overdraft departments. Looking after your own space takes some getting used to as well. Paradoxically, I've found that the absence of responsibility to anyone else for the state in which I live has actually made me more responsible - before, I could blame other people for mess, but now, it's all down to me. However, there are fantastic upsides to living away from home. Parties can be arranged anytime, and don't have to be held off until the family's on holiday. Equally, you don't have to tidy the resultant mess straight away if you want. You can bring back who you want, when you want, for what you want, and don't have to be answerable to anyone. You are able to live and die by your own rules. Fancy going for a walk at 4:30 in the morning? Fine! Now you won't go around setting the alarm off or tripping over the dog and waking everyone up. And that is what makes living away from home so good. The freedom. I've been away for a year now, and found that I can't go back for more than a few days without feeling suffocated. I suppose it really depends on your personality. My sister swears that she's not leaving home, and she'll be back every weekend. Hmmm... A
        ll in all, the choice is yours. I prefer to be away, but others won't. If you can't handle life on your own, then stay home. If you think you won't be ABLE to handle it, give it a try... you might surprise yourself. There are pros and cons on both sides, but I've got a sneaking suspicion that once you've tried living your life for yourself, you won't want to go back.

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          15.06.2001 02:07
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          Deciding where to go to university is a huge decision, one that should not be taken lightly as it has the potential to affect your working life and career after you graduate. While many factors need to be taken into consideration – how good is the college?; what are the entry requirements?; is the course content what I am looking for? – a major decision that needs to be made by a lot of students is whether they want to live at home during their course, or move away. -------------------------------------------- Living at home This option is worth considering if a local college offers a course you are interested in and you could potentially get a place on. The advantages of staying at home are: 1) Parents can often be very accommodating when it comes to rent, and let you live at home for a much lower rate (or even free!) than you could get if you moved away - a big factor to consider if you have a very tight budget, especially now the average student debt is soaring to around £10,000. 2) You avoid the hassle of moving all your stuff. (And believe me, it is a hassle if you have got as much stuff as I have!) 3) There is no need to spend ages house hunting, agonising over choices of housemates, or finding that you can only afford really crap digs on your meagre budget. 4) Staying at home will offer you a quieter environment for studying than any student accommodation could. Halls in particular can get very noisy, which can be annoying when you have an essay due in the next day and can’t get any peace to do the work. 5) No homesickness or getting lost in a new city. 6) Depending on the type of family you are from, there may be added benefits such as home-cooked food, an on-site cash dispenser (dad), and not having to do all your own food shopping. Also less chance of your food being nicked from the fridge by the people you are living with. (Trust me, very annoying). <
          br> Of course, living at home also comes with some disadvantages as well: 1) For some people, the thought of living with parents and siblings for another three years is disadvantage enough. 2) The local college may not offer the course you want, or have a very good reputation, forcing you to take a second rate option. At best this may leave you feeling dissatisfied, and at worst may lead to you dropping out or having reduced career paths when you graduate. 3) By staying at home and having things such as shopping, laundry and cooking done for you, then you don’t learn important skills such as independence, budgeting and how to use a washing machine without shrinking your laundry. Sooner or later we all need to be able to do these things (unless you are very rich, of course) and I feel that the sooner the better. -------------------------------------------- Moving away The alternative choice, to be considered if you cannot do the course you want to locally or you just don’t like your local college, and your money can stretch to living elsewhere. This is the option that I chose, as the nearest university to me that offered the subject I wanted was a good 50 miles away – I figured that moving away and living close to where I was studying was a better option in the long run than making such an awful journey every day. I found that the advantages of living away from home were: 1) I was within walking distance of libraries and lectures, something I could never have had at home, even if I had gone to my nearest college. This is a big plus, as shorter travelling times mean longer lie-ins in the morning! 2) Independence. I could come and go as I pleased, eat when I wanted, stay up late without bothering anybody else, and yes, I did learn how to use a washing machine and cooker. It also meant that I could bring my boyfriend back for, um, “coffee”. :-) 3) Living
          away from home forced me to become responsible for my own time and money in a way I don’t think I would have ever managed at home. I have to admit that the experience left me feeling more confident, self-reliant, assertive and mature than I was before I went to university. 4) I met far more people than I would have done had I just been living at home, although admittedly this was something of a mixed blessing! 5) Moving away allowed me to live in a city that was completely different to my hometown, which was a very positive experience (once I had found my way around the place). I loved the fact that I was lucky enough to live in such an attractive city, and that I was constantly finding new things out about it. 6) By living away from home, I had the opportunity to attend a really good university, with one of the best courses on my subject area. Although the work was difficult, I think that my degree will pay dividends in the future, and I am very grateful to have been given such a wonderful chance as this. Inevitably though, there are cons to this option: 1) It normally costs more to live away from home, although rents and living costs do vary enormously across the country. I was very fortunate in that I managed to find decent, reasonably priced accommodation for my three years of university, so this wasn’t too much of a problem for me. 2) Student accommodation can be noisy, and there are often food thieves in kitchens. 3) Homesickness. If you think this may be a problem, it is a good idea to look for a university that is close enough to home to allow you to go back for weekend visits, but not so close that you live at home. Facing up to homesickness is something you will need to do eventually, and the weekend visits will stop it getting too bad. -------------------------------------------- My verdict Overall, I have to say that moving away from home is the bette
          r option, providing you have the financial means to do so, and you are not restricted by other commitments. What you stand to gain from setting out on your own, in terms of freedom, independence, maturity and the chance to live in another part of the country is almost as important as the degree itself, and I think far outweighs any of the cons that I have listed above.

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            08.06.2001 00:48
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            im writting this opinion on the advantages and disadvantages of public school. Since the elestion is today and labour hate public school (because they turf out the elite at every thing) i thought i might as well write about them. I have been in most systems. when i was 13 i was in the state system and i learnt nothing. i then moved to public bording school and it was alot better. Public schools are found up and down the country some examples of them are Royal Shrewsbury school, Eaton and harrow. These are some of the more well known ones. The public school system is very good. Once you are there you are put into house with about 70 other people in. here you will spend the next five years taking exams and working very hard. In the first year there yo uare normally put into a bedroom and study with about 5 other boys in .But once you get older you get your own room. Public school works you extreamly hard from 8 in the morning till 10 at night. they are ver yvery good. I fyou have a son and have a spare 80 grand then i recommend you send him to public school. it is also very good fun.!!!!!!!!!!(believe me it is!!!)

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              30.04.2001 21:34
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              I chose to go to university away from home for a number of reasons and two years later I know I made the right choice. I'm just finishing my second year at St Andrews at the minute and am really looking forward to going home for the summer but I still wouldn't prefer a uni closer to home. Home for me is Northern Ireland and one of the main reasons I chose St Andrews instead of Queens was that the fact that I wanted to leave sectarianism behind. After 18 years I was fairly sick of all the religious bigotry and politics of home. I think its most peoples experience of uni that no one really cares where you come from or what religion you are, which still isn't the case back home. I also needed some space from my parents, wonderful as they are everyone needs to grow up and learn to look after themselves...the sooner the better. And if you choose to live away from home you get thrown in at the deep end! I picked self-catering accommodation, so I had to cook, clean and do laundry all for myself!!!! (the trauma) Its probably easier to go into halls in first year as you don't have to worry about food and you have a load of other people in the same boat as you. In my self catering house I was put in with 4 second years and a 3rd year, and that was really daunting even though they turned out to be very nice. I must admitt I was fairly homesick for the first couple of weeks. I missed my mum and dad, my cats, my bedroom, my little brother, my friends, and my mums cooking. I think my mum cried every time I phoned for the first week. Despite this I settled in very quickly, made lots of new friends ( most of which I am still very close to) and started having fun. No parents, no bedtime, no one to make you go to lectures. You can eat what you like, wear all the clothes your mum hates, and get very drunk...crawl home at 3 in the morning and sleep with your clot
              hes on! But seriously, I would highly recommend going to university as far away from home as possible because it gives you freedom and independence. You have to learn to deal with your own problems and sort out your own messes. I've grown up so much in the last two years and have learnt a lot of things that no one can teach you. University is a great life experience and a fantastic opportunity to meet new people and make new friends. University in a different country can give you a new perspective on the world and a fresh outlook. It also opens up a whole world of possibilities. Your university years are supposedly the best in your life, don't waste them going home with your laundry every weekend. Remember mum is always only a phone call away, so even if things do get sucky, you can always call home for some love and attention.

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                18.03.2001 06:35
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                Picture this... you arrive at your new home, all of your possessions have been packed out of your parent's car and all nicely placed in your room and suddenly it clicks! In exactly 2 minutes your parent's are going to leave you ON YOUR OWN!!! OH THE SHOCK!!! In your panic you grab hold of your Dad's leg so he drags you across the floor with you crying - "Daddy - don't leave me here! Don't leave me here! Aaarrgghh!" In reality, however, this sorta scene doesn't happen, you kiss and hug your parents goodbye and see them drive into the distance. Before this your Mum and Dad will probably say things that'll embarrass you in front of who you'll be living with for the next year. Take for example my Dad who said to the blokes on my floor - "Look after her, make sure she's in bed before 9pm, tell me if she EVER gets up to anything!" oh oh and also "Look out for this girl… she'll drink all you blokes under the table" (well that night they wanted me to prove my father's words right - I DID! :-P) Yep! You've guessed it - I live away from home in halls of residence and in fact I'm "president" of them next year when I'm in my Second Year. My advice is (if you have the choice) NOT to go straight into a house and have to live with a bunch of strangers in the first year. But to live in Halls of residence where you'll meet SO MANY MORE people, some you'll love and will be great friends with and others that you absolutely CANT STAND and run and hide behind a bin or something in a pathetic attempt to avoid them. Living away from home can have its ups and downs as can living at home. Whilst I live away from home up in Hull my best friend lives at home and commutes into London, from Milton Keynes, when she needs to. So what I’ll do is compare between my friend’s situation and mine - to live at home or not to live at home – that is
                the question? Live at Home ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Right – the main thing is where the university is! Obviously if you live in Cornwall and you’ve decided to study at Edinburgh then YOU ARE NOT GOING TO COMMUTE every day (unless you love your mum’s cooking sooooo much!!!) Most of my uni friends who live at home live around 30 minutes away from the university, and it costs one of my course-mates £50 a week in petrol to commute from Grimsby to Hull everyday. My friend has a student railcard so she pays around £40 a week to get to London via the train. Neither of their parents ask for any money because in the end they’re probably paying the same amount as if they lived away from home (maybe a little less). My best mate HATES living at home all the time and she wishes she could live away from home. Why? Well for a number of reasons; 1. It was rather awkward during fresher’s week. Whilst everyone was making friends, getting drunk, partying and socialising my poor friend had to go home and not take part in any nightlife. Now she stays in a friend’s room when they all have a night on the tiles, but she didn’t get quite the same experience as them during the 1st week. This also meant feeling like a bit of an outsider when it came to lectures etc, but now she’s friendly with others who live at home and know how she feels. 2. Its rather inconvenient getting home every night. If her lecture finishes at 6 then chances are she wont get home until about 8/9pm. This also means that she doesn’t get her work finished until late, although she does most of it in the library in between lectures and during the weekends. 3. She’s 19 now and HER PARENTS ARE DOING HER NUT! She also has to put up with her adolescent brother. HOWEVER; 1. It is cheaper, and her Mum does all the domestic stuff for her like laundry etc – although she does help! 2. She has a permanent part ti
                me job which she’s kept since she started sixth form! 3. Some of our friends haven’t gone to university so they’re still at home for her and it’s nice to see mates when they’re back for the weekend from uni. 4. She has her parents at her disposal when she needs to talk to them, get some money out of them or need their free “Taxi service” Live Away From Home ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Ok – Living away from home in my view is the best thing that you can do. Yes! I know you have to fend for yourselves, cook and clean after yourselves, basically look after yourselves without your parents but the truth is – some time in your life you are going to have to part with lovely Mummy and Daddy. But they are only just a phone call away and it is really good to have some QUALITY TIME without them! Usually contracts in halls are for during semester time only and so you’d be living at home during vacations. And unless you really don’t want to – you can go home frequently (or not so frequently) at weekends. Another bit of advice is when choosing a university is to have somewhere that’s not too far to come home sometimes but too far for you or your parents to keep on visiting and going home ALL THE TIME! The main points about living away from home are; 1. NO PARENTS! You don’t have to tell them where you’re going, who you’re going with, what time you’ll be late, why you’re going etc etc ETC! WAHEY! I can hear you scream - but there are some people who have come from EXTREMELY sheltered lives and are “let loose” in a sense, away from their parents for the first time and abusing many of the advantages of studentdom, these people should be avoided as they can come across as very immature and selfish. 2. You learn so much more than a degree in Quantum Physics – or whatever you’re studying! You learn various social s
                kills; you have to get along with your hall mates, if you aren’t catered for (advised advised!) you cook for yourself, you clean after yourself (but in halls there is a lovely lady called a cleaner who hoovers and dusts your room for you though!) you learn “lessons in life”(hey – cheesy - I know! 3. You meet so many more people in the halls than if you stayed at home. This is extremely important during fresher’s week when all you do is socialise! 4. You are so nearer to the university cus most halls are on, or near, campus (unless the university is across the road from you!) 5. You have a phone! So if you ever get homesick or miss you Mummy then she’s always at the end of a phone-line for you – and so are your friends. 6. When you do go home for the weekend or for your vacations you have a great time with your mates back home cus when you all go out its more a special occasion than when you used to go out all the time before you started university. You also get a load of attention off your parents and money if you need it. You get to appreciate everything you have at home with your parents and friends etc. But more importantly your parents get a shock to their system when they realise that you’ve have grown up and aren’t as dependant as you were when you were like 16! 7. Although your all time best friends are at home and you’ll always keep in touch with them you can get to meet some FANTASTIC friends up at uni. And I know a few people who have met their husbands and wives in university halls. So there you have it! I would strongly advise to live away from home. My best friend is in her second year – getting a house with course-mates, and shall I tell you something funny? One of my hall-mate’s parents live only down the road from our halls and yet she chose to stay in halls away from home! (In fact she has the same postcode as she has had all her life!) I think she
                realises what an experience she would be missing out on if she didn’t! And the most important piece of advice if you do live away from home – PHONE YOUR MUM… she worries! :-) xxx

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                  16.02.2001 00:42
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                  This isn't about the TV prog is it? no, never mind. What you have to accept if you choose to go to university in your hometown is that you will generally be in the minority on most courses. I’m now going to sum up the advantages and disadvantages to attending your home town university, so settle down with a drink (I have, brandy if your interested) and away we go. Disadvantages 1) You will most likely be considered weird, rejecting the excitement of the bright lights and drinking opportunities of a different city for your hometown delights. 2) People will think you live with your mum. Absolutely none of their business and make sure you tell them so. 3) You will be considered the walking oracle of your hometown and people will persist in asking you where all the dance clubs are when you spend your time at Rock City. 4) EVERTHING that is wrong with your hometown will be pointed out to you as though you were in charge of town planning. Advantages 1) You can live with your mum/boyfriend/uncle frank in comfort and at far less monetary expense. 2) Your friends are already here and people will think your the most popular person in the world as all your night are already booked up (just don't tell them Tuesdays always been pub quiz night at the Crown) 3) You already know the places to avoid so when they come crying to you with their problems 'I didn't know it was a transsexual bar' ‘but the bouncer seemed nice’ you can look smug. 4) Anyone you meet at Uni. who is also from your hometown automatically becomes your friend as you already have something in common. 5) You don't have to pack up all your possessions and take them to student accommodation where they will be stolen/lost/thrown up on. Not a definitive guide but just a few pointers for anyone who's making the decision. You
                  have been warned, your dammed if you do and dammed if you don't.

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                  02.12.2000 23:34
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                  I feel like crying when I hear about someone studying at a University from there home. Please, please don't. I'm serious. Even if you actually have to live away from home but just in the same area, it's not wise. University is NOT studying a subject and earning a degree. University is the initiation into adult life - it's the weening away from the security and comfort of a home - it's diving into the deep-end and learning to swim - it's the first tentative step into the big wide world. That all sounds corny, and clichéd it may be - but it's also true. Especially if you're very attached to your family, your local friends and your native area it's not going to be a particularly pleasant experience at first. But it really is essential. If you go off and study for 3 years at the other end of the country and decide you hate it, fine - return back home - but for pity's sake make sure you try. Each area of the country is so very different - and even if you've moved around a lot it's always worth stepping out. For me it was particularly important. I live in Cornwall, and have lived in the same house for all my life - I could have gone to Exeter University, but that is simply a waste of an opportunity. So now I am here in York university, 400 miles from my doorstep in a foreign place with different people with different habits, and it's great. I may not want to live here all my life, but it's an experience. In my view you should always be pushing yourself to do things that you're slightly against doing, just for the sake of experience. I was secure and comfortable at home, so I move far away and build up security and comfort there - when I get secure and comfortable in my Hall of Residence, I get to move out and start again elsewhere. And the outcome is there are map of places to which you feel attached - in which you can find security. So don't take away your options and give yoursel
                  f just the one Rabbit hutch, no matter how warm it is. There are fields out there which you may like just as much - step out!

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                    25.11.2000 22:30
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                    I am an overseas student so I obviously didn't have an alternative but living on campus... And what a great alternative!!! I would recomend anyone planning on going to university to live on campus at least during the first year. At first it's a bit scary and you feel quite lost but soon you realize that everyone is on the same boat and it gets really easy to make friends. I met some people who were living out of campus and the general opinion was that they were all feeling quite left out of the university life. They also found much more difficult to get to meet people. Seriously, if you have the opportunity, stay on campus as long as you can...

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                    13.11.2000 19:22
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                    The question of whether to stay in your university town or to travel is a bit of a difficult one and involves many factors such as money (most importantly), your nearest university, the course you want to do, transport and the cost of accommodation. The advantages of staying at home are fairly obvious. The amount of money that you save is incredible especially with student grants basically not existing any more. You are fed, watered and kept warm by your parents. No nasty bills or incredibly noisy flatmates to drive you nuts. I travelled for my first year at university and it was rather convenient. A forty minute train journey and a 15 minute walk and I was at uni. I didn't mind the train journey as several of my friends also travelled. On a cold frosty morning it wasn't too appealing but it wasn't a hardship. One major bonus that as well as getting a grant (I went to uni a while ago!!), I could also reclaim my travelling expenses. This meant at the end of the academic year I got about £1000 back. I looked on it as an unofficial savings account! Staying at home also meant that I could keep my Saturday job that I had started when I was at school. This also gave me some extra money. The bad points of staying at home? Well they didn't become apparent until I decided to move into a flat in my university town. When I moved through I discovered all the things I had missed out on. My new flatmates (they were all strangers when I moved in) were rather fond of good nights out, something that I entered into whole-heartedly. I discovered all these wonderful pubs and clubs that actually played music that I liked. I could eat dinner when I wanted to and I could eat what I wanted to. I could go out as many times as I wanted with no one disapproving. Life became very easy going and it was all my decision. I've always been a very independent person so living away from home was excellent for me. It allowed me to grow up (when you'
                    re faced with bills it's a good idea to grow up quickly!) and become more mature. Once I left home I never went back except for holidays or the odd weekend. That was 9 years ago and I love it. I can't believe there are people my age who still live at home. I don't think either my parents or myself could have coped with that!! My one regret is that I didn't live in university halls in my first year. If I had my time over again I would definitely do so. Your first year is the best opportunity to meet people and party as there is less work and the pressure isn't so bad. Uni halls can be loud noisy places but there you can meet friends that will stay with you for the rest of your time at uni and may even be future flatmates (you can see how tidy they are before you move in with them!). I think it is definitely easier to make more friends if you stay in your university town. It's easier to attend societies and clubs and the impromptu pub-crawl is no trouble at all. No worries about getting home or where to stay. If you can afford it stay at your university definitely!

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                    09.11.2000 01:04
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                    I travel about 25 miles to university every day and I think it’s fine. Its less expensive and with three of us at university at the same time, its impossible for our parents to pay all that money about 10 grand for each of us, 30 grand for three years, so it’s very expensive. My results haven’t been affected by me travelling, I still have all the independence I need, along with free food and the comfort of my own home. So, it means I do not have to worry about getting a part-time job as the bills are always paid. The only problem is the dreadful weather, commuting in the car can be very difficult especially with the winter weather. Its ok in summer but winter is a nightmare, luckily my lectures finish at 5 so its not that bad. It probably cost me about £7 a day on petrol so about £35 a week so its not that bad. I sometimes use the public transport but it can be over an hour late and then with all the traffic you can get seriously delayed. I hate waiting in the bus station by myself, and trains well they are ok but since the train crashes I do tend to ignore them more. I don’t miss out on social events, if there is one I just stay over with one of my friends, so commuting doesn’t mean you’ll be miss out on nights out. The only problem with commuting is winter, the rest of the year is fine. It saves you money, you still have your washing done, so I don’t think its that bad at all. At least I won’t have a huge student loan to pay off when I graduate.

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                    07.11.2000 18:28

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                    My daughter started at Middlesex University thi year, and has had a lot of hassle re- accommodation. Firstly, she was unable to live on campus, despite being a fresher, because those that live furthest away, get in first.Mostly that means overseas students, as 3,000 miles will always beat 120 miles! I have nothing against overseas students, but surely the system could be fairer than this. Ultimately, she has had to fall back on the private sector, which in London is very expensive, and has been let down by unscrupulous landlords whopromise the earth, but at the end of the day, if a better offer comes along will change their mind, and off you go again looking for another flat or house. I would imagine she has had more stress in keep moving than any brought about by exams at college.

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                    03.11.2000 17:07
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                    I remember the day well, I was SO nervous it was unbelievable. Who would I be in a house with? Would we get on all right? Would they be nasty 'orrible thugs with spikes through their nose? All these questions and more gnawed away at me before and on Monday September 18th 2000, the day I moved to University. After a long calamity about missing keys (I'm in house 5 room 3 yet a girl who lives in house 3 room 5 was given my key by mistake, she then disappeared meaning for a short while I did not have a room to live in, it was all sorted out ASAP though, thanks Dave) I was let into what was to be my room for the next year. At first it was a bit of a culture shock, parts of it were better than my old room (double-glazed for example) yet it was a bit sparse and just 'new'. I set about unpacking my stuff (thanks Mum, Dad and Roger for coming along to help me) and met my housemates one by one as they entered during the course of the day. They are all great blokes and we were all as nervous as one another. I would NOT swap living at Uni for anything. Sure it costs more than living at home (depending on if your parents make you pay board of course) but it is worth it for the independence you develop. Learning how to cook (easier than I thought it would be), how much soap powder to put in when doing your laundry (the first time you use too much it's funny, the second time isn't) and so on and so forth. For once in your life you can live without anyone telling you what to do and it is scary at first but you will settle into a routine. A few of my friends have gone to Uni and stayed at home, IMO they are missing out on a big part of University life. They can't stay out too late, as they have to drive the 1 hour and 40 minute slog back home, they haven't made as many new friends (not that I've made loads I might add). Live at Uni if you can, you won't regret it.

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