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      21.03.2002 04:11
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      I've been collecting Tudor Mint figures for about three years now. Originally I started collecting so that people would have an idea of what they could buy me at Christmas and birthday, I'm difficult to buy for. I now have around twenty figurines of varying sizes. The Tudor Mint itself has been around for a while, originally dealing in traditional ornamental pewter pieces in the jewellery and metal craft industries of the Midlands. It began to make fantasy figurines when this industry began to die off (I did know exactly when, but for the life of me I cant dig out where I got the info from). Pewter Studies Pewter Figures of mainly Dragons, Wizards and Fairies. Cast from a hand moulded model these are highly detailed and each study has at least one Austrian crystal. Each figure bears the name of the study, its number and the designer. Some pieces also have the name of the person who made the mould. Miniature studies are around 4cm in height. The price for one of these is usually around £8. Medium Studies around 8cm in height. You will pay anything from £18 - £25 each. Large Studies around 11 - 18cm in height. Prices on these range from £40 upwards. Extra Large Studies 24 - 28cms. Prices on these tend to be around the £100 mark. There is also a collection of Tolkien figures, zodiac eggs, letter openers and chess sets. Resin Studies. Made of a resin they call ?Polystone? these are coloured figurines very much like the myth and magic studies, each coming in varying sizes, with similar prices. Also included in these ranges are candleholders, musical waterballs and an Arthurian Legend range. I don't rate these as much as the pewter figures, though the workmanship and detail is to the same standard. Retirements and special Editions Pieces are regularly retired from the collection and their moulds are destroyed so that no more can ever be made, the most valuable stud
      ies around are usually retirements. Special editions are issued regularly, some will be around for a limited period (e.g. the millennium year) some are limited to a specific number, again these are generally quite valuable after the period in which they are available. The Mint has a collectors club, which, issues a yearly club study free with membership and entitles the member to purchase special members only studies. Collector Club As mention before, membership of the club entitles you to certain studies. Membership for this year costs £20. Also included is a bi-annual magazine with completions, news and contributions from other collectors. Invitation to club events, last years was a Drayton manor park for £4 per ticker (inclusive of park entrance for the day) which I didn't manage to get to. The events offer the chance to see new studies, buy studies at a discount and enter a number of competitions including the design your own competition. The winner gets their design made, only two are ever produced, one for the winner and one for the Mint archives. The value on competition studies can be around £1000 instantly. Where to buy. The website www.tudormint.com has the facility to view pictures of the studies in very fine detail, but it does not appear to offer a purchasing facility. The website www.dragontayles.co.uk has a fairly comprehensive range of studies at quite reasonable prices. Postage an pacing is charged by weight on each individual item as Royal Mail rates (bear in mind, some of these are pretty heavy) There are usually a number of Tudor Mint items for sales on ebay. I have bought two retired pieces myself, but had to stop looking because I couldn't resist and it was getting expensive. Be mindful that sometimes the description doesn't tell you the size of the study, you wouldn't want to bid £20 for a miniature thinking you were getting a medium. They can also be purc
      hase from a number of shops around the country, most of whom would be happy to order the piece you want if they don't stock it (well the ones I've used didn't mind) If your going to collect anything this makes a pretty good choice. Even if you're not a collector then they can make a thoughtful and unusual gift. Oh, if only I had more room and money.

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        20.08.2001 21:45
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        If you want to build up a collection of antiques which are not too old and fragile, not too expensive, and above all look good on display without taking up too much space, crested china miniatures, or heraldic china, could fit the bill. From around 1900 to the outbreak of the second world war, most souvenir shops in Britain carried a range of small mass-produced pots, vases and other shapes with transfers of the town or county. The name most associated with these pieces is Goss, the family which started them. William Henry Goss, one of the chief designers and modellers at Copeland porcelain manufacturing, Stoke-on-Trent, left the business in 1858 to set up his own firm. By the early 1880s, demand for larger and more costly porcelain ware was drying up, and at the suggestion of his elder son Adolphus, the family decided to test the market for producing what they called heraldic porcelain. This had previously been manufactured in a limited capacity, and restricted to arms of university colleges, a few of the better-known public schools, and famous people. Adolphus suggested they offer pieces with the appropriate coat of arms of towns or seaside resorts, small, mass-produced yet of good quality, costing about a shilling each. These would be attractive as souvenirs to day trippers on their excursions to the seaside. Success was immediate, and soon the Goss family were making miniatures for many more towns and villages, inland as well as coastal, cities, boroughs and counties. All were eagerly snapped by an eager public. At first heraldic coats of arms were produced only on small vases, but the range of shapes soon extended to small pots, teapots, receptacles of every shape imaginable, trays, Melton Mowbray pork pies, straw boaters, wheelbarrows, horn gramophones, watering cans, animals, birds, and pieces of furniture, such as sofas, armchairs, fireplaces and grandfather clocks. To mention but one or two. There were so
        successful that a range of other, more up-market goods was introduced, including commemorative ware for royal jubilees and coronations, miniature busts of famous people, coloured models of famous houses and other buildings. Yet it was always the crested china pieces which remained most popular, as the price was within nearly everybody's pocket. By the time of William Henry Goss's death in 1906 the firm was well-established and approaching its zenith. Items for the Franco-British exhibition at White City in 1908 were made in large quantities, as well as for subsequent exhibitions at Crystal Palace, 'Festival of Empire', 1910, and the Wembley British Empire Exhibitions of 1924 and 1925, but with the Great War, it went downhill. Changing public taste, loss of overseas markets and labour shortages worked against the firm. Despite a successful range of patriotic pieces showing flags and arms of the triple entente nations, and after the end of the war, peace souvenirs, the firm was losing money. Competition had been provided by other firms, including Arcadia, Carlton, Kingsway and Corona, and in 1929 Goss was purchased by another company, George Jones & Sons Ltd., who had already acquired several of the other rival names. The slump of the 1930s hastened the end. Nevertheless, pieces had already been made in such vast quantities that they remain readily available today, and at sensible prices. Look around car boot sales and the less pricey, bric-a-brac style antique shops, collectors' fairs and markets in large towns, and you should be able to acquire specimens in perfect condition for only a few pounds each. Check them carefully before you buy. They are pretty robust, but as with all pottery and porcelain items, susceptible to rim chips and hairline cracks. Any respectable vendor will mark anything damaged as A/F (As Found), or else not bother to offer the item for sale - but give stuff a swift once-over first anyway. <
        br>The range of items is vast. Though individual places account for the vast majority of pieces, there are also miniatures for educational and medical establishments, originally bought by their students. That's right, they actually wanted to purchase mementoes of their school or college days, so it's safe to assume that enough of them enjoyed their education to make the production of such pieces commercially viable. Also, miscellaneous organisations like the Ancient Order of Foresters, Hendon & Cricklewood Rifle Club, and, aha! The International League of Goss Collectors all made pieces; plus the commemorative and military items already mentioned. When I became interested a few years ago I went the usual route of buying more or less anything reasonably-priced that I could get my hands on. After a while I decided to restrict myself to the historical items, and those representing either places in my home county of Devon, or alternatively towns and cities I have visited on holiday. Among my favourites are a jug for Buckfastleigh, with a deer on the coat of arms; a bottle for Princetown, its crest showing the prison; and a very ornate swan with the crest for Devonport. All are about 3 inches high, the swan only 3 inches long, and all cost me only about £4-£6 each. I'm still looking for something in the shape of a cat or a pig. Not surprisingly, everyone wants them, and they don't come cheap. Further information: There are several price guides and books by Nicholas Pine on Amazon, of which the major ones are 'Goss and other Crested China' (Shire, 1984, 0852636628, £2.25), and 'Price Guide to Arms and Decorations on Goss China' (Milestone, 1991, 1852651164, £19.95) On the web, go to www.gosscrestedchina.demon.co.uk/ www.gosschinaclub.demon.co.uk/ I consulted one of the major dealer's lists there while researching this op, and found prices to suit all - from a Paignton
        tram at £195 to a Littlehampton coal scuttle at £9. Postage extra, I should add. But try those car boot sales or antique markets first.

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          29.07.2001 03:22
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          Little did I realize, many years ago when a beautiful selection of figures caught my eye in a little shop in Hastings that I was about to make one of the best investments in my life. For the princely sum of £8.50 I purchased a small pewter looking figure of a dragon with a lovely Austrian crystal in his hand. Fifteen years later I have over 100 of these figures, many of which are worth 3 or 4 times what I paid for them. ~~~ Myth & Magic ~~~ The Myth and Magic range of figures are produced by a company called "The Tudor Mint", there are similar figures available but these are merely cheap copies. Each figure is mould cast and detailed spectacularly. The figures of witches and wizards have hair, the dragons have scales and as you look at a figure you often see little extra details which surprise you. The figures all look like burnished pewter and each one has an Austrian crystal mounted in it. What surprises most people when they pick one up is the weight, the first ever figure I bought is 3" tall and weighs 12oz (I have electric kitchen scales!). These figures are made in solid metal then plated with the pewter effect. When a piece is retired the mould is destroyed so no more of that figure can ever be made again, this helps your figures increase in value on the secondary market. ~~~ Purchasing ~~~ Myth & Magic figures can be purchased from many gift shops, H Samuel's and at one time were sold on QVC. Prices range from around £16 for a regular sized figure (about 3 or 4 inches tall) to around the £60 mark for a large study on a wooden plinth. Today there are many figures sized and priced in between those two sizes. Years ago there were also some extra large figures which retailed for around £500 but I havn't seen any that size in a long time. ~~~ My Collection ~~~ From that first figure I bought in Hastings my collection has grown. Every year new figures are brought out, far more than I would
          ever buy but it does ensure that there is always a good selection to choose from. As the name suggests the figures are all of mythical and magical figures, dragons, wizards witches etc. I personally collect mainly dragons, although I do have a few of the other figures too. The crystals originally were all small round or square ones but now I have figures with large oval and heart shaped pieces. My husband always buys me a figure for my birthday, Christmas or any time he thinks I need a treat. ~~~ Collectors Club ~~~ Back in 1990 the Tudor Mint started a collectors club. For the price of (then) £9.50 which was the cost of one figure, you got a years membership. Included in the cost of your membership was a figure, which was specially produced for collectors club members, that original figure is now worth around £150 in my mind a worthwhile investment. For your membership fee you also get a magazine twice a year called the "Methtintdour Times" – Methitintdour is an anagram of The Tudor Mint. The magazine is packed with information about the figures, new pieces, members stories and a list of which figures are due to be retired. Membership of the collectors club also entitles you to purchase 2 special members only pieces during the year. ~~~ Roadshows ~~~ During the year there are various "roadshows" held by the Tudor Mint around the country. Collectors Club members flock to these for the chance to buy special "Roadshow Only" pieces. You also get to meet the staff who design and make the figures and enter competitions to win special pieces. I went to a local roadshow about 4 years ago at the end of the day, whilst I was browsing round my name was called – I'd won the prize draw! My prize was the piece that had been getting everyone's attention all day, a gold and silver dragon in an egg never before had anyone seen a piece in anything other than pewter. As I left someone offered me
          £1000 for my prize – I didn't sell it and I've been told now its worth around £3000. A few weeks later I got a letter from The Tudor Mint saying I'd won a prize which would be delivered shortly, I thought they had made a mistake as I already had my prize. It turned out I'd also won the other competition held that day and the second prize duly arrived, a bronze Pegasus again worth a lot of money because its not in pewter. I couldn't believe my luck! ~~~ Rarities ~~~ As I mentioned earlier, whenever a piece is retired the mould is destroyed so it can never be made again. Buying pieces which are due to be retired is a good way of ensuring the value of your collection increases. If you are a member of the collectors club the magazine gives you notification of retirements. If you use a good gift shop to purchase your pieces the staff will also know which pieces are due to retire. Other rarities include pieces where the mould had to be changed. Occasionally a figure has been produced that had lots of production problems which has caused the Tudor mint to make a new mould, figures produced from the original mould shoot up in value due to their rarity. All the collectors only pieces are only available for a short time so they all end up with a good value within a year of you buying them. ~~~ The Bottom Line ~~~ I fell in love with these figures as something pretty to collect. I love looking at my collection in its special cabinet and I love receiving new pieces. My collection has been valued at around £8,000 but cost a mere fraction of that. By becoming a collector I have found something I enjoy and a good investment. I doubt if I'll ever sell my figures but at least I can always enjoy them.

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            02.07.2001 17:15
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            I came across the pocket dragons about 5 years ago as my (now ex-long story) best friend started to collect them. As she collected I would buy a one at Xmas or birthday for her. (Note I would all ways buy a cheap one I will tell you about prices later). The pocket dragons are very cute ant to me look like they are made of marzipan. No you can eat them. My friend had a very gullible boyfriend. Who she conned in to buying her raiding the cookie jar. This is a collector's piece and limited edition as it cost around £100. I thought it was a lot of money. If he had not bought it for her. She would have just pouted and called him cheap and then with held his bedroom rights if you know what I mean. I must admit that I have three pocket dragons. I don't collect them. So how come I have three. Well I knew that my now hubby and I would get married. And as I knew that it would never been convention wedding. I wanted something a bit different for my cake topper. As I did not want just a bride or groom of bunch of flowers. So I saw her comes the bride and here comes the groom. I thought gorgeous just what I want for my cake. And at the time as we thought that the wedding was going to be slightly different to what it was, so I also bought the ring bearer as well. As I thought that he was so cute. And I thought that my stepson could have carried the ring bearer on a satin cushion with out rings on it. But alias due money constraints (don't we just all have them) We could not do that. So in the end all three ended up on top of my cake and it looked lovely. After buying these three said dragons I left my local jewellers about £52 lighter in the wallet. But they are so lovely and cute. They are now on my bookshelf. As I said before start off in prices from about £8-9 for the little ones and can go up to well over a hundred pounds a piece. The most expensive ones are limited editions. They normally have
            about 3500 run. Sounds like a lot. But not when that is world-wide. As well as the dragons they have friends that are gargoyles. The gargoyles are brown colour where as the dragons are light green in colour with black eyes. They have such a wide range of facial expressions. That is what makes them cute. As you look at them and I see young children. Children who have been told off pull those sorts of faces. You can't make is one of the pocket dragons. And it has such an expression as can't make me no matter how much you try. Every Christmas they have winter/Christmas limited edition so if you collect there is one to put on you letter to father Christmas. The web site http://www.pocket-dragons.com/ is great. It has loads of information. Tells you pieces that are retiring, any new pieces and the collector's pieces as well. Real dragons are created by Real Musgrave. But they seem to be part of a group called Collectible World Studios which also seems to have Piggin and the right shoe as part of the collection. I am glad that I don't collect the pocket dragons due to the fact of cost. But also due to the fact that as with many other collections the turn over of new prices seems huge. As a real fan and collector you would never been able to afford to buy them all. I know that this is nothing to do with my op here. But I think that collectible companies should have more of a conscious as to how many new pieces that they produce a year. If they introduce 10 new pieces a year at an average of £12 that is a £120 per year before any special pieces are produced. So it can get very expensive to say the least. Overall as an odd present to special friend they are well worth the money.

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              02.07.2001 05:35
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              • None!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

              Well it's about time I wrote an opinion on these little fellows. After all they have taken over my home in recent years. What has got me thinking about them lately (other than seeing at least ten where ever you look in my house!!) any way what got me thinking about them today were my lovely work colleagues. I have gained promotion and have left my old section, as a leaving gift the darlings got me a whimsical pocket dragon. As an avid collector, as you can imagine I was over the moon!! Particularly as it was the members piece, which entitles me to one years free membership (i'll tell you more about that in a minute!!). For those of you who have not a clue what I am babbling about, where have you been??? Seriously look in the window of any H Samuel store and many others and you will see cute little green dragons in various sizes, poses etc. 'You can't make me', 'tea for two', 'raiding the cookie jar' to name but a few. They are a seriously collectible item if you like cute,sweet and green!! I began collecting six years ago and now my house is dragon land!! These cute dragons start off reasonably priced from about ten pounds upwards, but you do build up to the much wanted limited edition peices which are available for a short period and normally cost in the hundreds region. I have 'Bathing the gargoyle' which I believe cost around a hundred and fifty pounds (a gift). Alas with a little one those days are long gone so I really was over joyed with my leaving prezzie!! I still manage the odd small dragon in the sales. Pocket Dragons are the creation of an artist called Real Musgrove. He based the first ever dragons on his pet dog (and believe me if you have a dog or cat you can relate to that with some dragons and their expressions!!) He is constantly creating new designs so as a result some that have been out for a while are retired to make room for the new ones. These peices then usuall
              y become much sought after!! Real is based at Wetherbys, and there is a centre there that collecters can visit to look round, see the original drawings, and even have a bash at making one(in my dreams!!) they also have open days around the country and indeed also abroad in the US and Canada where you get the opportunity to meet the artist himself (I'm not worthy!!) Oh what I wouldnt do to get to one of these!! Real normally creates a peice just for people to buy on that roadshow as a special momento of the day, I have one peice that somebody kindly got for me!!! To become a member of the pocker dragon club, you have to purchase that years members piece. You used to have to send off to do this, but now you can buy them in the shops and then send the enclosed paperwork off, much simpler!! You get a lapel pin for free and regular newsletters and catalogues. With members getting first peek at new editions to be released! Trust me if your an avid collector of anything, you will know that such catalogues are pounced upon!!! I have this year been able to send my members application off and am now waiting in eager anticipation!! I only hope Real keeps going for a long time, I would be lost without my lil green buddies!!!!!!

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                25.06.2001 04:48
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                A few years ago, I saw this lovely we figure in a shop in Belfast. It was a pale creamy pink ceramic pig from a series of collectable called 'Piggin' Pigs'. He was sitting ona pile of books, with a really confused look on his face and was called 'Piggin' Paperwork'. I had just started my degree on the O.U, and it seemed to fit me perfectly - so I bought it. That was the start of a collection that I love to bits. I'm not a fanatical collector. Infact, I got cute, and told people I was collecting them, so other people would see them and buy me them! Clever or what! Now I say I consider it bad luck to buy my own! It's great. These wee pigs all have a great expression on their faces, and sum up the character they represent really well. A few of the ones I have so far are: Piggin' Traffic Wardens: He is sitting on a TW's hat and has a bit of said TW's trousers hanging out of his mouth. Piggin' Tee'd Off: He has a pi**ed off look on his face and a putter in his moth. Piggin' Pay Day: One of my faves - He has an elated look on his face and is waving a big wad of cash in the air. Piggin' Together: This is one of two pigs cuddled up together in love (ah, bless!) Piggin' Sick: He has a bandage around his head and a thermometer in his moth. The piggin' pigs are all cute as hell. They come in 3 sizes. Small is about 1 1/2 inches tall, medium is about 3 inches and the big ones are usually limited editions around 9 inches. The small ones are arounf £12, medium £18 and the large are around £99. The big ones are dear, but as they are limited editions and come with a certificate of authenticity, I think they're worth it. (especially, as I don'y have to pay for them!) Some people buy me other types of pigs when they go on holiday etc. I'm too nice to point out that I collect Piggin's, so I put
                them somewhere else away from the 'real' ones. My husband once got me one called'Piggin' Stuborn'. This is a middle sized one who is just sitting there looking like he's got a real strop on. He said he saw it and thought of me! Piggin' Cheek!!!!

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                  04.01.2001 21:37
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                  I began collecting Lilliput Lane cottages when I moved into my current house in 1989 and my parents bought me a cottage called Inglewood as a housewarming present. It started a hobby that has grown and grown. I now have over 100 cottages and am fast running out of space to house them all. David J Tate MBE founded the company making Lilliput Lane cottages in 1982. He is a Yorkshireman and originally began making models of the buildings that he had loved as a child, but in detail such as had never been seen before. To make a Lilliput Lane cottage the first thing that happens is that the sculptor makes a model of the building concerned. This is then covered with silicone to make a master mould, from which further moulds are then made. The cottages themselves are made from Amorphite a specially produced material, which enables the detail to be seen clearly. They are passed to teams of painters who have strict instructions as to the colours to be used for the painting process. If you take the tour of the Penrith studios you can see this happening! Each of the cottages produced has a small stamp on it, known as a Backstamp, giving the name of the company and the year of the model. Some of the cottages are based on actual properties such as Bridge House in Ambleside and others are based on a type of property prevalent in a particular area. They also make ranges such as the Beatrix Potter range including properties which she owned and subsequently donated to the National Trust and properties which she featured in her books - The Tower Bank Arms being one of these. Recent ranges include the British Landmarks range, which has Big Ben, Westminster Abbey, Micklegate Bar in York and many more. They produce an annual cottage for the collectors club members as a free gift, one to buy each year, and a further one at Christmas. As these are only available for one year before retirement the value increases quite quickly over su
                  bsequent years. There is an English range as well as Scottish, Welsh and Irish and there are also ranges from America, France and Holland. Each cottage comes with deeds and a card explaining where the real cottage or type of cottage can be found and a bit of information about the real property. Quite often we have been out visiting somewhere and I have spotted a building, which I have represented in Lilliput Lane form. The beautiful old wooden church at Greenstead in Essex and All Saints at Watermillock in the Lake District are two that I have spotted on the map and when we found them they were unmistakable as the models I had got at home. Luckily Dave is kind enough to drive off the beaten track to try and find these for me! The cottages increase in value as they are only available for a limited time and are then retired. This of course makes them rarer and so the price escalates. The original cottage, which started my collection, was about £10 when bought as new and is now worth £70 so you see what I mean. One of the rarest cottages (and no I don't have one) is The Cliburn School. Lilliput Lane made only 64 of these models and they were given to the pupils and staff of the school on the day of its closure. They were never available for general sale and are now valued at £2,500 each. I was lucky enough to find some cottages in an antique shop recently. I bought two of them for £29 and £39 and when I got home and checked the value they were worth £90 and £95 respectively! That is my best find to date but I live in hope of finding a ‘Cliburn School’ at a car boot sale for £1! Mind you I’m not sure that my conscience would let me buy it without telling the seller about it! I keep a complete list of all my cottages, when and where bought, by whom and why, for sentimental reasons but I also keep a note of the current value just in case I ever need the information for insurance purp
                  oses. Luckily on the two occasions that my house was burgled none of my cottages were touched. I am a member of the collectors club and they send me a current price/value list each year so I keep my list up to date from that. I have visited the centre where the cottages are made in Penrith and I took a tour of the factory, which was fascinating. There is also a website at www.lilliputlane.co.uk, which gives information about the cottages, the collectors club and the studios at Penrith. There are also pictures of a cottage in its various stages of development, if you’re interested. The only real problem with collecting Lilliput Lane cottages is that they are a nightmare to dust!

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                    06.10.2000 07:14
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                    I started collecting these adorable figures this year when MacDonalds released their set of Toy Story 2 figures. I collected them all for my son and then realised how wonderful they all looked on display and claimed them for myself (wicked aren't I - I do let him play with them - I aren't totally heartless!). My next step was to scour the online auctions for the American Mc Donalds toys. Here I found a wonderful set that I was able to purchase from someone in America with ease. I have bought several items from the shops but manage to keep the collection to the smaller of the toys. At a local boot sale I was delighted to purchase several of the characters at bargain prices. The most expensive toy was £5 (beanies) and the cheapest have been 5p - you can't complain at that! The collection has now grown and my husband has had to put me a large shelf up in the bedroom. The current amount of toys just about fit on it! I aren't expecting my collection to be of any value in the future. I am just getting an enourmous pleasure from the thrill of the purchase and seeing them all sitting happily on the shelf together. This is a collection with which you don't have to keep telling the children to keep away from!!

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                      11.09.2000 00:10
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                      Piggin' Collectables are a collection of cute little piggies all based on everyday tasks and challenges like Piggin' Diet (That's me), Piggin' Football, Piggin' Ironing etc. and are wonderful to mark special events. My husband just brought me Sleeples Nights to celebrate the bith of our baby daughter. All the figures vary in size and price so there is somthing to suit every pocket, with prices starting from around £9.99 upto the limited editions of £250.00. Not only do you have the figures, but also a range of other items including water globes, T-Shirts and trinket boxes. There is also a collectors club you can join which allows you to buy special pieces only available to members and a Web Page where you can buy Piggin' items, catch up with the latest news or trade with other collectors plus much, much more. The only draw back with collecting Piggin' is once you start you can't stop! (I should know, I started off with one brought for a special occasion and I now have over 100).

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                      27.08.2000 21:57

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                      The 'Piggin' series is an endearing collection of pig figurines made by artist David Corbridge for the Collectible world studios. We first started collecting Piggin' 5 or 6 years back and have fell in love with the comically graceful pigs that have expanded in their sheer variety of expressions and antics. they can be naughty, soppy, loving, caring, messy, sporty, respectable, ridiculous but always loveable. The good thing about these pigs are that not only you do they come for any occassions: Weddings, Engagements, love tokens, Christmas , birthdays- they also are appropriate for any kind of emotions and even ailments! ( you must see the Piggin' Hayfever) The names of these figurines are as endearing as the figures themselves: there is piggin' tired, piggin the middle, piggin football, piggin skint.. you name it. They must be nearing around 100 in number and growing. Apart from forming an enduring collection that you can amuse yourself with, these are often quite a valuable investment: the moulds for each figure is broken and the figurine itself 'retired' usually 12-18 months after release thereby rendering each one a limited edition. Also there is acollector's club you can join and get exclusive special edition figures that are only available to club members. You get the opportunity to meet the artist at times in organised events. The success of 'Piggin' has spawned several imitators. These are often tacky and poorly made. The originals are genuinely expressive and sculpted with obvious love for the subject by David Corbridge. The sizes vary, and so does the prize: can range from £9.99 to £99.99 depending on the figure. Most average between £9 and £ 20 making them very affordable. Piggin' has it's own website : www.piggin.com for news upsdates and sneak previews. They recently won several awards for business venture. I am a confirmed piggin' fan now and I am su
                      re you will be too once you cast your eye on one of these little pigs.

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                      22.08.2000 02:37
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                      Lilliput Lane cottages are the most sweetest houses on the market. They are made based on real properties in the united kingdom. The detail on them is exquisite. They do a range of Beatrix Potter houses and they now do a range of famous landmarks in London. They vary in prices starting at £9.95 they are worth collecting as they make a nice showpiece and as long as you keep the deeds that come with them and the boxes they are packaged in they do go up in price they are very collectable. I often buy the older ones on Ebay and my family and friends are never at a loss as to what to buy me for birthdays and christmas.

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                        30.06.2000 05:51
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                        These ornaments are made by a company called 'The Tudor Mint', who sound very expencive, but are not too bad. These are really nice ornaments and each one has a led crystal on it. Most of the designes are of dragons, and all have their own name. I have only found one place that sells them, H Samuals, so they can be expencive, depending on what size ornament it is. The small ones, (fit in 1 hand) are around £18.00, and the larger ones, which are usually limeted edition and you need 2 hands to hold, cost around £55.00. the small ones are quite heavy for their size! so the bigger ones weigh a ton! You also used to get the Baby dragons in the eggs, but I've not seen these around for some time, so I don't know if thay have stopped making them.

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