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      12.11.2013 21:25
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      Lose the fascist uniforms!

      95% of animal abusers are animal owners, according to the lists of people who go through the courts for the offences. Random non pet owning people don't attack pets, the owners do. But the biggest offenders of all are those who are supposed to take care of them when no one else will. Around 55,000 animals a year are put down by the RSPCA, controlled volume killing on the levels of NAZI Germany. This is HALF the number of animals they SAVE a year, not a lot of that saving going on. Doesn't matter how healthy the animal is if they can't find a home for it with the general public or another charity, they get rid. Some would say the RSPCA reflect animal lovers in general in that they simply cant cope with the pure volume of abuse out there and have become the local council pound so have to euthanize to stay on top, whilst other suspect the top guys and girls would rather have big salaries and pay for celebrity endorsement than build new kennels and catteries to save more animals, the Oscar Schindler's they should be. Ok, they have to take a lot of animals in due to over breading, poor owners and recession but if people knew those numbers they would think twice about handing animals over to these guys. Again, every bird with a busted wing or manky dog with mange is going to cop it. Better to just let them go stray and take their chances. Around 4,000 perfectly healthy cats and dogs are taken around the back and the bolt gun to the back of the head every year. If you do the math's each RSPCA premise must be putting down animals every hour of every day. The RSPCA then have the cheek to sell pet insurance?? One whistleblower killed herself after being attacked by the charity she worked for after revealing just how industrial the killing was. Vets, by far, have the highest suicide rates in any profession in the U.K., second only to farmers. RSPCA workers will be joining that list soon. The charity gets around £50 million a year in donations, a big fall from just ten years ago. Things got so bad in 2009 they stopped accepting strays as there was simply no room. But what they haven't stopped doing is enjoying being the animal police, money spent on prosecuting abusive animal owners up year-on-year. One poor old spinster cat lady was raided and her 13 cats all put down by the RSPCA that afternoon. Those cats were alive and living off scraps like all cats do and now they are dead. Which is crueler? There are plenty of cat ladies on dooyoo that can answer that one. These guys are hypocrites, spending £350,000 on lawyers alone prosecuting David Cameron's local hunt last year. That money could have built some new kennels for a smaller hybrid charity and the RSPCA could have sent some healthy animals there. They have clearly become political the way PETA has in America and so it's no longer about the welfare of the animals so much. The only defense I have for the RSPCA is the supermarket syndrome where potential or current owners seek too much perfection and obedience in animals. I worked in Tesco's along time ago and shoppers would only buy the 'good looking' fruit and vedge. If it had an imperfection it would be left in the trays to be binned at closing time. In fact one third of all perfectly eatable fruit & vedge doesn't leave the packing plants because they know fussy customers won't buy it. It's the same with pets at the pound or when owners don't have a cute adorable mutt anymore. In South Wales 10 German Sheppard's were put down by the RSPCA all at once because the owners didn't like the skin condition they had. Is that an animal lover? We don't like to say it but we prefer animals that are cute and obedient over animals that genuinely need love and rescue. It's always a nice story when you hear of people who do go for the raggy ass one in the corner of the pound that needs the most attention and love but it's rare. I know we have some dooyoors who do exactly that. Well done girls! A big chunk of dogs handed in are those ugly status dogs like the Staffordshire's and Bull Terriers. They make the news when owners or people are attacked by them but rarely do we hear in the same newspapers just how many are put down a year because they are labeled a threat breed because of that bad press, around 2000 a year having to go. No wonder they attack the hand that feeds them! Every sink and council estate is woken by a dawn chorus of yelps and barks by these guys as they know their fete as the RSPCA officers dressed as Germans come knocking one day. For some Staffs it will be out selling drugs with their owner all day whilst other are guard dogs or simply there to make the owner look 'ard'. If a breed is going to be put down with no question sits these guys. I believe it's actually the German Sheppard's breed that are responsible for the most attacks in the United Kingdom, presumably why the cops and security firms use them to bring own villains. So, will the new boss of the RSPCA appointed in July change things? Well he certainly has change something - his first authoritative pen stroke on his desk putting up his salary by 45% of the last chaps salary, a cool £150,000 a year now, this when donations are falling. Two other bosses are also on six figure sums. Is that really the charity you want animals to end up at? Those high street chuggers looking for your bank details are the ones that help you pay his salary.

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        08.09.2012 19:46
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        A terrible incident due to the RSPCA doing nothing when they were first called.

        The RSPCA have been of no use to me what so ever. In my local area there is a family who have numerous cats who are all breeding amongst themselves and having several litters of kittens. After calling them at least 8 times, they still done nothing! Due to them not doing anything and being absolutely useless a member of my family had a kitten crawl up inside his car bonnet and strangle itself on the fan belt. Called the RSPCA and informed them and all they said was 'Dont worry it's not your fault'. No its their fault! If they actually motivated themselves when they received the calls incidents like this wouldn't happen! You seem them doing several things on the tele with Rolf Harris, don't be fooled it's all an act. They are the most disgusting company I have ever had to deal with. Definitely not animal lovers. They don't deserve any stars whatsoever!!!

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          15.06.2011 12:03
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          a traumatic situation with no practical help from the RSPCA when I needed it

          The following piece refers only to my specific experience of interacting with the RSPCA in an emergency situation, and does not necessarily reflect upon the RSPCA as a whole. MONDAY EVENING around 7.30 PM I had just finished taking a bath and saw that there was a message on my phone from my boyfriend asking to call him back ASAP. So of course I call him, and here is where I was in for a shock. He had just arrived at work to find an abandoned baby bird left in the car park outside. As an example of the hideous cruelty that people are capable of, the said baby bird had been put inside a black bin liner complete with nest, the bag was tied up and just left there with no way for the bird to escape. It was fortunate that the bird was a very noisy littl'un and my boyfriend heard its cries which lead to its discovery. I was horrified at this and don't even want to think about how long it had been there for and why on earth someone would do something so cruel. I made my way over there as soon as possible to pick the poor thing up and bring it home for the time being, seeing as the other half works in a nightclub and there was no safe place to keep it inside. MONDAY EVENING around 8.30 PM I return home with the baby bird bundled up in a quick fix carry case that I made out of a shoe box. I lined it with shredded paper and cut some air holes in the top, then wrapped the bird into a t-shirt before placing it inside the box. I hoped that this would be safe enough for the journey home as it was obvious the bird was in a severe state of distress. Thankfully it had a strong spirit and was making loud chirping noises every few minutes while I was transporting it that kept reassuring me that it was still alive. By the time I got it home I was feeling pretty distressed myself and tried to quickly assess what I should do to make the bird comfortable. I took it upstairs safely away from my cat and made a layer of towels to serve as a soft but stable base. I took it out of the t-shirt as it had become a bit dirty, and wrapped it up in a soft fleecy blanket. The poor little thing was a sorry state and was incredibly weak, as well as being damp in places from where the bin bag had been placed in a puddle and it had soaked through. I made up a semi-warm hot water bottle and stuck this underneath the "princess and the pea" style layer of towels and blankets that I had made, and hoped that this would keep the bird warm and comfortable. We didn't have any pipettes or syringe feeders, so I attempted to drip feed it some water using a straw (holding my finger over one end to control the liquid) as the bird was so weak it couldn't even raise its head and was unable to drink from the bowl of water I had prepared. It was becoming obvious by this stage that the bird needed some serious help and I was unsure if it had any injuries, although everything looked intact and there were no signs of blood or breaks. MONDAY NIGHT around 9.00 PM It was too late to call upon the vets so I found the telephone number for our local RSPCA branch and tried to give them a call. There was an answer phone message saying that the office was not open until Tuesday 10.00 AM and it gave the phone number for the emergency line. I then tried calling the emergency line and to my surprise, I was met with an automated menu system. I suppose that the RSPCA have a lot of cases to deal with, but I was extremely worried and upset at this time and I found it difficult to listen carefully and select the correct options at the menu stages. From what I can remember there were different options for if you required an emergency call, if the animal was wild, and if the animal was in a secured location. I then got through to an operative who took my details and enquired about the state of the animal. I reported what I had found and where the bird was now, and as I was checking on the bird at the same time I noticed that it also had some sort of lice problem as they were dropping out all over the blanket. The bird was still chirping away in the background so I was hopeful that things would turn out alright. The call handler took down all this information and said that they would pass the details on and see if someone could come out to collect the bird. Before they were about to end the call, I jumped in and asked for advice on how to care for the bird in the time being, as they did not offer any care guidance even after I had said that the bird was weak, possibly hurt and covered in lice. The advice given at this stage was helpful (although I would have expected to be given this information without having to ask for it! I didn't really have a clue how to look after birds other than just common sense and guesswork) - anyway in the end I was advised to the keep the bird warm and comfortable, in a dark area so it does not go into shock, give it water to drink and some bread soaked in water to eat. MONDAY NIGHT around 10 PM I received a call back from the RSPCA saying that there was no one available to collect the bird. I was feeling distraught at this news as the bird was so fragile and I felt like it really needed some urgent care. I was then supposed to take it into the local RSPCA branch the following morning. I felt really upset and helpless that I could not do anything to make this little bird better. It had managed to gulp down some sips of water, but would not eat the soaked bread when offered several times. I kept the bird by my side and watched over it, giving drops of water at frequent intervals. MONDAY NIGHT around 11.30 PM I was exhausted and worn out from the whole emotional experience, and so I settled down to sleep with the bird perched beside me on the bedside cabinet atop its stack of towels and blankets. It had stopped making the chirping noises for the past hour or so, and this worried me a little, but it had managed to fully stretch out its wings and attempted to move around a bit, so this was encouraging. I hoped that things would improve. TUESDAY MORNING around 2.30 AM I woke up and my first instinct was to check up on the baby bird. It was still in the same position beside me and it looked like it has taken a dramatic turn for the worse, barely moving and not making a single noise. I gave it a little more water but it only took two drops and then the rest spilled over its beak. I tried positive thinking and hoped that it was just tired and sleeping so that the rest would help it to get better. TUESDAY MORNING around 5.30 AM I woke up early this morning and sadly I discovered that the bird had died in its sleep. I was terrified just in case the person who had previously 'disposed' of the bird had also thought it was dead and by chance made a genuine mistake putting it in the bin bag, so I ended up dobule- triple- quadruple-... checking and in the end my paranoia subsided and I confirmed that it was well and truly gone. I was absolutely devastated and felt incredibly guilty that I could not have done more to help this poor unfortunate creature. I also felt angry and let down that the RSPCA were unable to offer any support or help in this circumstance. I know one baby bird is not particularly meaningful in the grand scheme of things, but I did not feel as if my call was treated with any degree of importance, and that my concerns were just swept away until the morning, which in this case was just too late. What a tragic outcome. I wish that more could have been done and that my little bird could have been given the treatment that it needed. The RSPCA is supposed to help prevent cruelty to animals but knowing what this tiny baby bird had endured through its short life, being left to die in a bin bag and then not receiving any professional attention after I reported its case left me feeling bitterly sad and defeated. I hope that I do not have to come across this sort of problem ever again, but I can only say that if I do I would always try my best to take care of the animal and hope wholeheartedly that the RSPCA could help if needed in the future. All I can say now is I'm glad that the bird ended up in the hands of an animal lover and that it died in relative comfort after giving it my best efforts, not abandoned and alone in the position it was left in.

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            28.09.2009 22:46
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            My experience of the RSPCA

            Up until recently I have always been semi- aware of the RSPCA, I have donated the odd few pounds here and there but have been quite naive about the work that they do. But then after an upsetting phone call where the RSPCA rang to let us know our beloved cat had been run over I have become a lot more aware of what else they do. After a member of the public rang them, they collected my cat and tried the best they could do keep her alive but had to put her down due to the extent of the injuries, they then contacted us and we collected her. I was expecting to have to pay but fortunately we didnt, so after spending several weeks missing having a feline friend waking me in the morning I decided to repay the favour by homing one of the many cats they have waiting to go to a loving new home. The RSPCA go out of their way to ensure that all their animals are given to a suitable and loving home, I had to give details of my other animals along with proof of their vacinnations and am awaiting a house check to make sure she will be coming to a cat friendly home. It seems quite rigourous and may put some people off but I can see why it is necessary, especially with the rise of animal cruely and neglect. As well as rehoming animals, they also respond to any information given to them about animals being mistreated. As they are a charity they rely on donations given to them or volenteers working for them, and after seeing the work they did to put my cat out of pain I am hoping to either volenteer to help or give regular donations. To rehome our new kitten who we have named Cookie, you do have to pay £50 but this includes them being neutered or spayed, microchipped, and fully vaccinated, and when you consider to get all of this done would cost over £100 and you are rehoming an animal who has already suffered and is on its last chance of a good home then this is a small price to pay. I would definately urge everyone to check out the website and if you are thinking of getting a new pet why not just pop into a rehoming centre and see if there are any suitable there first.

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              20.06.2009 14:22
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              I will never use them again I will only use them as a last resort

              Apologies for posting this in the wrong area. Just waiting to find out how to move this. It should be for the RSPCA in general. I have had quite an experience with the RSPCA this week and I have to say I am absolutely disgusted with the way they responded to our call. To fill you in there are two stray cats that hang around our house. They were here before we moved in so we have been feeding them for the last year. They come almost every day around tea time for their food. One of them went missing about three weeks ago so we assumed that maybe the poor thing had been knocked over on the main road. The poor thing turned up four days ago dragging both its back legs which were just limp. As the cats are not tame catching it was a bit of a problem. As we live in a basement flat it was difficult to get up the stairs before the poor things scarpered. Believe it or not the cat could really shift. Plus as it is quite ferral we couldn't get near it. So we had a think what to do and came to the conclusion that the RSPCA was the answer and so it began. The first call was unsuccessful. We explained the situation and they basically said that they would only come out if we could catch it. So we tried but the cat had gone into hiding and that was the last we saw of it that day. The following day i went into the kitchen and to my suprise the cat was sat outside the kitchen so we tried again to catch it. As we opened the back to it fled again. At this point I was becoming a bit distressed as it really was awful to see this cat dragging itself along as it was obviously starving. So i called them a second time to ask them if they could come and set a trap overnight as I know it would go for food. There answer was that there was nothing they could do they would not even entertain the idea. I have the suspicion that it was purely because it was ferral. In the end I got a badger box off a friend and just tried to entice it with some food. It didn't turn up the third day so we assumed the worst. The fourth day my fella got home and the poor thing was at the bottom of the steps next to the back door which was unusual as they don't really come that close to the house it was obviously a cry for help. He managed to catch it as it couldn't get back up the stairs so once he did he called the RSPCA again. This time they agreed to come out but as it was not a priority it would be a couple of hours before they could get out to us. This was at 6:00pm. come 9:30pm there was another call to say that they were at an emergency all to a injured cat in Lincoln so they would get a local vets to open and we could take the cat at 10:15pm. As the cat was in need of desperate attention we did exactly that. Unfortunately there was nothing they could do for her as she was paralyzed and had been dragging her back legs for some time as they were quite scuffed so she was put to sleep. Although the cat did get attention it needed in the end it was not because of the RSPCA. I would hate to think how long the cat would have suffered like this if we hadn't caught her. The RSPCA is supposed to be against cruelty to animals but surely refusing to help in this situation was actually cruel as the cat suffered longer than it should have done. Even the vet was shocked that they refused to come out and set a trap and many other people I have told about this. I am absolutely disgusted as this cat would have carried on suffering if we didn't get lucky and catch it. In fact if the cat hadn't of come to us I don't think it would have ever got any attention. If this wasn't a priority then I don't know what is. This is what this society is for and they really failed. I will never rely on them again. They didn't even offer any advice how to catch or handle the cat. For anyone who is interested. If you find an animal that is in desperate need of attention call the RSPCA and ask for a log/lot number which they are obliged to give by law so when you get to the vets you give them the number and the RSPCA will be billed for any treatment, even if the animal can be saved and you decide to keep it. I know there has been a lot of success stories but I am now wondering how many incidents like this have taken place. I am really disapointed this cat deserved attention as much as a spoilt fluffy furball that is stuck in a tree.

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                09.05.2009 14:11
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                Go in, take a look around so i can say i told you so.

                The Rspca is an organisation that helps Animals in pretty much anyway you can imagine. We have adopted a cat from there once, but after he died we got two kittens (almost a year old now :P). If you want to check out the site go to http://www.rspca.org.uk/ . Not only can you adopt from them, but they make investigations to see if people are treating there animals well. For example we reported people to the RSPCA for neglecting there goats. They are the organisation that stands up for mistreated animals. R oyal S ociety for P revention of C ruelty to A nimals For me. The RSPCA is a local Charity, and it is by far the best and for the best cause. I reckon RSPCA get quite a lot of money in comparison to other charities such as "Geraminy" (?) and this is because everyone lovess animals and who wants to see injustice happen to innocent animals? I say this because my friend walks past it everyday and she sometimes goes in, and the amount of great stuff they have there. They have great condition genuine Brands such as 'Ralph lauren', 'Hackitt', 'Superdry', all your high street stores and more. The main problem is, people in general are looked down upon for getting clothes in a charity shop. But when you see clothes worth £60+ for £5... you can't be picky. A lot of rich people donate clothes to charities and RSPCA is a hot spot. And I know I have donated a few things over the years. So I'm just saying, you never know what you will find in the RSPCA. Dario.

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                  06.01.2009 13:21
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                  Take care of your animals

                  Before I start I must state that this is my experience of one dealing with the RSPCA and not the RSPCA in general. A couple of years ago a (now ex) friend of mine started to keep pet rats, I had some as well and they are brilliant pets. As time went on and I went round to visit her frequently I realised that she wasn't taking care of them properly, the cage was filthy and they often didn't have food or water, it got to the stage where I was visiting purely to top up their water and to clean them out, I offered to take them off her hands as though she might be too busy to look after them but she refused. On my next visit i discovered one of the rats had a large lump above one eye, rats are very prone to tumours and this was probably what it was, I offered to take it to the vets and even pay but she couldn't be bothered. It was at this point that she became an ex friend and I decided to get the RSPCA involved. I gave them a call, the guy I spoke to was very friendly and helpful, he asked for my name though I didn't have to give it if I didn't want to and he said he would get an inspector out to look at the animal- I would be kept informed of what happened. I heard nothing so a week later I gave them a ring for an update, I was told that they had been round but no-one was in, they left a card under the door saying that they would call again on a certain day and time. Funnily enough when they called at this time the rat was clean ,fed and watered,although they obviously didn't pick up the rat to feel it's bones or notice the huge tumour. I understand that a lot of people will be thinking-yeah but it's only a rat. To me an animal is an animal no matter what it is. My ex-friend then went on to get a kitten which 3 months later was rehomed as it spread fleas all over the flats where she lived as she couldn't be bothered to treat it. Although I have praise for the RSPCA in the way that they took notice and visited, why on earth give people warning of when you are going to call? obviously you will find the animal is mysteriously looked after when you visit! In the end I went round to her flat and took the rats away, one had a huge tumour and had to be put down-the RSPCA didn't notice this? This was a difficult review to write as I don't want to put people off calling them if they know an animal is being mistreated, and they generally do a fantastic job, I just wonder if their way of dealing with these cases should be looked at?

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                    26.08.2008 13:35
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                    An essential service that should not go forgotten.

                    My involvement with the RSPCA started at a very early age and continues to this day. My first recollection was going to pick up two new black kittens from a foster carer and thinking "Wow, I hope I can help out when I'm older". 15 years and a number of adoptions later I am happy to say that I am now volunteering at my local RSPCA centre (The Paws Centre, Norwich) in my spare time. So, who are the RSPCA and what do they do? It all begins in 1822 when Richard Martin MP introduced the first anti-cruelty bill which gave cattle, sheep and horses some form of protection. Then in 1824 the (R)SPCA came into being, at first as the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, based in London, England. There were 22 founding members who all strove to provide care and support for animals. By 1840 the SPCA had gained such recognition that Queen Victoria gave her permission for the charity to become the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals - or as we know it now, the RSPCA. Cut forward to the present day and you will see that the original values put in place by the founding 22 members are still as strong as they ever were and every day hundreds of animals are given the help and quality of life that they deserve. The modern RSPCA is a registered charity (no. 219099) and receives no lottery funding or aid from the government. This means that the RSPCA runs solely on donations and legacies made by the public. And I think anyone will agree with me that this is a truly amazing achievement. The RSPCA's mission statement is: "The RSPCA as a charity will, by all lawful means, prevent cruelty, promote kindness to and alleviate suffering of animals." And they do so, every day in huge numbers and it's all thanks to the many members of staff, volunteers and general public who go out of their way to make sure animals are given dignity and rights. The RSPCA operates on many levels, whether it be at the grass roots; providing education to children and adults a like or on a national/international level with their many outreach and adoption centres which offer a variety of essential services (such as vaccinations, neutering and microchipping) as well as finding new homes for those animals in need. Can I help and how? Anyone can help aid the RSPCA, whether it be through making a small monthly donation, volunteering in a rescue centre or charity shop, temporarily fostering an animal or providing a permanent loving home through an adoption. Another, very important, way of helping the RSPCA is by keeping an eye out for animals in distress or those that have been injured or are otherwise not 100%. The RSPCA relies on the eyes and ears of the public to bring attention to any animal, no matter how large or small, that is in need of help. So, if you do see something amiss, the number to call is 0300 1234 999. The line is open 24 hours a day so there is always someone there to help. You can find a lot more information on the official website: http://www.rspca.org.uk/ Well, back to my own experience - as I said at the beginning, I am now volunteering at my local centre one day a week, on a Sunday. The centre specialises in small animals, but mainly cats and dogs. I work in the cattery and help feed, clean and socialise the cats and kittens when they arrive and also help the members of public choose an animal that's right for them and answer any questions they may have. I find this all such a rewarding experience and really would recommend it to any one who has a bit of spare time and love to give. I think I should also mention how I found out about volunteering: I recently bought my first house after living in rented accommodation for a year and half without any pets. Now, this is a big thing for me as I've had cats around me ALL my life so within weeks of moving in I knew I had to go out an find some little fluffy companions! I initially started looking around in local newspapers and on breeder sites but quickly realised that I would rather provide a home for animals that may have not had the best start in life. So off I popped to the RSPCA and there I found my babies, Sqwigglet and Kumi - a pair of young sisters who had been ill treated by their original owners and needed a new start. The process for adoption was very thorough and professional: Once I had found my cats, I spoke to a very polite member of staff who went through a few initial questions to assess, on a very basic level, if we would be suitable to adopt. Everything was fine and the next step was to speak to one of the Animal Care Team who have the authority to proceed with adoptions and make the necessary arrangements. Again, they ran through a (much more in depth) list of questions which provided them the relevant information to start about the adoption process. Costs and requirements were also discussed to make sure that we were aware and happy with the financial implications. Once we were happy, a home visit was arranged to make sure our house and surroundings were suitable and then, for the time being we were done. About three days later, the home assessor came round and made sure everything okay. One thing that really impressed me was that they didn't give any negative comments - only solid advice on things that could potentially be improved for the arrival of the cats. We passed the home check - hurray! From there, we booked a day to pick up the cats and to sign anything that needed to be. On the day of the collection we, again, met with a member of the Animal Care Team to just go over a final few things and to sign the adoption forms and then, with much glee, we were able to see our girls and take them home. From picking the cats to taking them home it only took 5 days and going by my experience as a volunteer this seems to be a standard and very commendable turn around. So, if you can, please do take a few minutes to mull over the idea of helping out in any small way. It's so rewarding for both you and the animals you'll be helping. And on a closing note, here are a few little bits of information that you might find helpful: * The official RSPCA website is: http://www.rspca.org.uk/ * The 24 hour Animal cruelty helpline is: 0300 1234 999 * There are 56 centres nation wide so it's very easy to get in contact * Standard adoption fees are: Cats: - Kittens (6 months and below): £60 - Cats (above 6 months): £45 Dogs: - Puppies (18 months and below): £100 - Dogs (above 18 months): £80 * Adoption fees include: vaccinations, neutering (if the animal is under the recommended age for neutering a voucher will be provided to you), de-fleaing, deworming and microchipping. I hope this proves to be useful to you - so, thank you for reading!

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                      30.03.2008 19:54
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                      pls help as well if you can

                      I would like to tell you about something that is very close to my heart, my local RSPCA. For almost 4 years (since I moved to England) I volunteered at my local branch, so I'd love to tell you what I do and how you can help as well. I love all animals, but dogs in particular. Because of our working hours we can't have a dog at home (wouldn't be fair on the poor sod) so I called my local branch a few years ago and asked them how I could help. I just wanted to get involved with animals. They told me, that the best way to start would be to come and walk the dogs. They have dog walking every Saturday and Wednesday morning, so I went there the following Saturday and after I filled out a form, a staff member got a dog out for me. I remember her well. It was Elsa, a big boxer, that just had 14 puppies. She was a very loving and cute dog, but very very strong. Between then and now, I walked everything from Pomeranian to Rottweilers and I have to say, I never met a dog, that was aggressive towards humans. Some of them might not like other dogs (because the owners haven't socialised them properly), but all of them were very friendly and loving towards humans. That's what makes me get up on a cold, rainy Saturday morning at 8 am, when I'd love to stay in bed for another hour. As soon as you see the dogs, it's worth it. I know, I'm making a difference to there day. It is a great way of meeting people as well. There are so many different dog walkers, young women like myself, families, men (I'm afraid not too many of them) to pensioners. Every few months we have a meal in the evening, which is always very nice, because there we can actually catch up and get to know each other. After a while one of the other dog walkers asked me, if I want to come to the next fund raising meeting. I thought, sure, why not, and didn't really know what to expect. With about 10 people we were sitting in the staffroom, going through the program to the end of the year. There are some events, that get repeated every year, but they do want new ideas and ways to improve and change those events, that's why "new blood" is so important in those meetings. There were so many jobs to be sorted out, just for the coming summer fair, from baking cakes, being behind stores, to speaking to companies about prizes for Raffles. You see, the variety of people that is needed, is so big, that everybody could help if they have some spare time. After a while I asked, if I could do a course to be a home-visitor. A home-visitor is the person, who comes to visit your home when you decided to adopt an animal. This took a few months, because the courses aren't offered on a regular basis. The course itself took one evening, with a group of about 20-30 people. This was very interesting and I learnt a lot. Next step was going out with experienced home-visitors, which was fun and again, I met a lot of people, which can only be a good thing. I'm a home visitor for about 3 years now and the feeling, that you know this animal is going to a nice, loving home, is very heartwarming. The re homing in particular gave me a lot of confidence as well. Another way of helping is of course by donating money or unwanted goods. There are simply not enough kennels and staff to look after all animals properly and this money helps to pay electricity bills and staff. The RSPCA is not getting any funding from the government, that's why they depend so much on volunteers. They have a few staff, but they are on minimum wage and have always too much to do and too little time. This is not a complaint, they are doing a great job and are really good with the animals, but they need help. The easiest way to help is adopt an animal from the shelter, and not to buy a pet from a breeder. There are a lot of dogs and cats that are always looking for a new home, all ages, all sizes. There is no excuse not to do it. Not just cats and dogs, rabbits, guinea pigs and even hamsters are available from shelters. We even had ferrets, chicken, ducks and we have a pig called Boris (he won't be re homed though). Please think about this when you decide to have a pet and check out your local shelter. I hope I could inspire a few of you to voluteer your time. It is worth the trouble. Thanks for reading,

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                        09.02.2008 15:09
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                        if more people donated they would be able to offer so much more to the animals they save

                        I began rescuing unwanted and very neglected animals 7 years ago as a hobby, at the time we lived in a built up area in a 1 bedroomed flat, just me and my husband. Some one reported me to the rspca, i know who it was, they reported me because they wanted one of the animals we were looking to rehome and after visiting there home i refused to let the animal go to them as the house and there children aswell as the dog they had were not looked after to the standards i wanted for my animals and after all it was my right to say no if i thought this animal was going to be neglected, I didnt think anything else of it untill about 3 weeks later there was a knock at my door, standing there were two police officers, an rspca woman and a man from enviromental health. They were here to investigate reports of me keeping wild dangerous animals at my house, I hadnt got a clue what they were on about, They came in and inspected all of the animals, enviromental health left streight away as there was no concerns with the clenliness of the animals and later sent me a letter of apology. The rspca officer dismissed the police after realising there were no animals that needed to be seized but needed to take photos of all the animals and a record of what was there to check they were not dangerous. I was realy not impressed with the lack of knowledge of the rspca woman, she looked at the iguana that was there at the time, looked at the bag under his chin then asked, thats a bearded what? how stupid is that, she had come to my house knowing nothing about reptiles to assess them. She didnt even know the difference in a boa and a corn snake. Shouldnt these people be more educated in the field they work in. I recieved a letter about a week later stating that there was no further action being taken as there was no case to answer to. That was what inspired me to move to a bigger house, The rspca are not all that people think they are and its not there officers faults, they dont recieve enough funding to train there officers in all areas of animals and without experience are helpless to help these animals. They also suffer from the lack of resorces to keep these animals untill they are rehomes which realy falls down to petshops not vetting who they sell to more strictly and people not thinking about all the necessary before buying a pet, The rspca realy do do a fantastic job with the limited resorces they have but need a lot more help and resorces to do the job properly. I mean there is only one rspca officer in our area so she has to cover 1240 housing estates single handed, theres just not enough officers to go around or enough funding for more officers.

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                          17.05.2007 22:30
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                          I must say, althought I'm only 15 I would rather enjoy this type of work. As you said, its not about the money. Imagine staying up all night with the animals just looking after them. I'd like to do that, but how do I get more information on this area of volunteer work? Also I'd like to say that I'm slightly disappointed at the lack of reviews this post has had. In all my knowledge the RSPCA do a spectacular job looking after animals.

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                          30.10.2006 16:20
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                          top place, worth visiting, save these poor animals

                          Quickly introduce myself and then get down to business! As a child a friend of mine had a mum worknig for the RSPCA and due to my love of animals from an early age I spent most weekends at the RSPCA helping out. Well I hope I was helping! I was a young child so I probably spent a lot of time asking too many questions and getting in the way aswell! Since then I have gained qualificaitons in the animal sector including gaining a distinction in my studies of animal collections. (Organisations, businesses etc which work in the industry of animals). This enabled me to re visit and remember times within the RSPCA and also gain insight into other animal collections which allows a fair comparison to be made. The information below is from my experience and research and if you have any further questions please feel free to e-mail me on Sh02020998@hotmail.co.uk. Thanks and enjoy! RSPCA Although Re-homing and preventing cruelty as well as saving animals from cruelty are the main targets of the RSPCA, they also focus on educating the public, because the public must be aware of cruelty situations and what can be done to prevent cruelty as well as being well informed of what the organisation does, which can encourage volunteers and visitors as well as donations to the organisation. Firstly the RSPCA has a clear and well presented website which contains news updates of the current status of the organisation and case reports on certain new events and the development which is occurring within the RSPCA and any future advances planned. The website also offers a service for teachers which enables them to look up information to use in a lesson plan at primary or secondary school. This site also provides links to other sites to look for similar information as well as labelling their own information into age groups to make it easier for teachers to distinguish. There are leaflets, newsletters and online information about the RSPCA, how it was founded, the main goals and achievements which they have reached as well as plans for the future to continually improve and crack down on further cases of abuse to animals. There is also an online photo library of memorable cases at the RSPCA as well as business information and status information for the public to read if desired. It is simple to find the latest news and campaign plans online by doing a search for the RSPCA. This is useful as the news allows the public to see exactly where their donations are going, or to see the work being done and perhaps decide to begin donating to the cause, either way it allows the public to make an educated decision based on the facts which they are being shown. The next thing which the RSPCA offers is animal care information. There are fact sheets and a lot of information on their website with full information on how to care for animals correctly and the right techniques to use with animals. There is also information for general animal and pet care advice and contact details available to ask questions. In this section I also found further information into caring for wildlife and ensuring wildlife safety and protection which is good as it works to keep the public informed on wild animals as well as common domesticated animals which the organisation more commonly deals with. The organisation offers full information on farm animals and their current status and the way in which it could be improved in a very factual manner. This is also done with regards to farm animals used for food and they show the logo to look for when buying meat produce which shows that the animals have been kept and killed in a humane manner. The organisation also gives information online on animals which are used for research and the current status and problems which are occurring and being brought to their attention in this situation. This is given along with information on problems which are occurring with wildlife currently and also problems which are occurring with pets currently. Visitors, when visiting the RSPCA, are able to talk to staff to ask questions and there are many things available to read on the different animals and their backgrounds so that all visitors are fully informed on the animals history and can make an informed decision which they would not be able to do when adopting an animal from most places. Finally the RSPCA has a team of staff members called education officers and they do tours of primary and secondary schools as well as groups and some colleges to inform them of what the RSPCA does and educate them on issues which they can help with. This goes the extra mile to ensure people fully understand and support the organisation and I feel this is a very good idea as it is focused on getting as many people to help as possible and to prevent cruelty once again by homing in on the punishments which people will face. Recreation within the RSPCA is not a key factor. People are not charged to visit the organisation. The main key factor which the RSPCA deal with is simply providing enough space for the animals to live comfortably, but being resourceful with space as obviously there is limited space at each centre. There are toilets available for the public to use at the RSPCA, but there are no places to eat or anything as the main reason visitors are asked to go is to see the animals as opposed to it being a “fun day out” as some of the animals which are at the RSPCA are quite distressing to look at. There are adverts regarding the organisation on the TV. However, I would not say these are there to encourage visitors for any commercial reasons, and are instead to allow people to become aware of the immense pain and suffering people put animals through every day and to try to get people to come forward and inform them of cruelty or to re home a previously mistreated or abandoned animal. The re-habilitation of the animals which are at the RSPCA consists of re-homing the animal with a suitable owner to live with them permanently and allowing the animal to then gain the stability and love from its new owners which it deserves. The first thing done to prepare for re-homing is a full health check for the animal and the animal should be brought to full health and given all relevant vaccinations to ensure that the animal will be re-homed as a healthy animal and will not need medical attention initially. This gives the owner confidence when taking the animal that they will be able to concentrate on the animal settling in more than any other issues to begin with. The next thing to be done is finding out as much details with regards to the animals behaviour as possible. Finding out if an animal is good with children and other animal’s is essential. If the history cannot be found then the animal will not be homed with animals or other children just in case there is a problem. Following this, an assessment and long term monitoring of the animals behaviour is needed. Then getting the animal used to new people and going out for long walks and other things which it may not have had previously is done to try to make the transition to the animal’s new owners as smooth as possible. This is then all recorded and the information will be put up outside the animal’s accommodation for visitors to see. This information will include the animal’s behaviour traits, any recent or permanent health issues which the animal has, how the animal behaves with different people or animals, the age and sex of the animal, the breed if known, the animal history and reason for being brought in if known and any addition information about the animals favourite things or things which make the animal nervous. A person will then approach an RSPCA member of staff to be considered for re-homing. When this happens a reserved notice will be put up next to the information about the animal so that another person will not try to adopt the same animal. The person who has asked to adopt will have to fill in forms so that the organization is informed of their current situation and what they can or can’t offer the animal. Next a home visit will be organized. This means a member of staff will go to the potential owner’s home to check it is suitable to keep the named animal. This includes checking for other animals, looking at safety and security within the home, checking the local area to know if it is suitable and also using the opportunity to get to know the owners better and see why they want the animal. After this, if the owner is considered suitable they are encouraged to buy all the equipment and ensure it is all in their home before the animal will be given to them. For this reason, usually the animal will not be allowed to leave for at least 24 hours after they have given confirmation to the owners that they are suitable to own the animal. The animal is then re-homed to the person and the ownership remains with the organization, so they can take the animal back at any stage without warning if they feel it is in any danger or if they receive a serious complaint. The animal records are also kept on record and filed. Research which is done within the RSPCA is largely based on finding out the history of the animals which are brought in to them. This can be looked into using numerous different leads if direct answers can’t be found from the owner or if the animal has been abandoned. It is important to get the animal history when trying to re home as knowing how the animal behaves in different situations and the role the animal was playing before is good information to be able to offer to a prospective owner. The other thing which involves research is learning new veterinary methods, techniques and medicines for the team of veterinary staff which work in RSPCA centers all over the country, and offering training to implement these new ideas. Staffs need to learn new health and safety measures, new laws, as well as new methods of treating and advances in modern medicines. This is to check animals are getting the ideal treatment at the time in respect to current standards. Finally research into the company and into ways to inform and educate other people is done by a specialized group of staff. These people will work to create leaflets, newsletters, fact sheets, video’s, television appearances and books all based on the RSPCA for people to look at and be able to watch or purchase. The ethical aspects of the RSPCA do have two very different sides and opposing opinions found on each side of the spectrum. Looking at the good aspects first I will explain some of the aspects and opinions from each side and then explain my opinion and my reason for this opinion. The RSPCA rescues around 70,000 animals per year from situations of cruelty and neglect and give the animals a chance at a better life. It is impossible in my opinion to doubt in any way the ethics of doing this and to consider working to protect animals and provide them with a good quality of life as being wrong in any way. For this reason this is a prime factor in why people support and donate to the organization and why ethically so many people favour the RSPCA and will continue to give their support. The RSPCA provides food, shelter, water and exercise to all animals which are brought into them. The animals are also given medical attention if it is needed and are given regular behaviour and health checks, the progress of which is recorded. The animals are treated well by the staff and as much attention and care is given to the animals as possible to ensure they do not find it too stressful staying in kennels. The RSPCA work hard to bring relevant topics such as cruelty to animals into the public eye. They are trying to expose some of the horrible conditions which animals are being made to live in and show people the torture and torment which animals have to face everyday to raise awareness and encourage people to come forward so that they can prevent more cases of animal cruelty from going un-noticed. A negative factor for the RSPCA could be the way in which they go about advertising. Some of the images which are shown and the situations which are described can be very distressing and disturbing and possibly are not suitable for young children to watch as it may cause a great deal of upset to the child. Also, with relation to the advertising, the actual practice of creating an advert with animals in it can cause high amounts of undue stress to the animals which are being put in the advert and this can be considered to be quite cruel in itself and a little unnecessary. Also, keeping animals in small kennels is not entirely ethical. There is a lot of noise which the animals have to deal with which is not ideal for a nervous animal and could increase the chance of shock or panic in the animal which is not desired at all. My opinion is that the RSPCA is entirely ethical to me. I feel the jobs which are done are entirely with the animals needs at the heart of the organization and that the staffs are trained to work to care for and protect the animals which they take in or visit. I can’t really agree with the ideas about the negatives of the organization as I feel it is important to let the public know the severity of cruelty which animals have to suffer and that if this is distressing to viewers then it has done its job. After all it is about showing just how bad the conditions are and this should not be pleasant to watch for a regular viewer. I would say from knowledge studying and from knowledge from within the RSPCA is brilliant and you can not doubt the work they are doing is for a good cause. The workers are higly over worked and the job is demanding, so the next time you visit the RSPCA smile at all the workers and donate some money to this brilliant cause!

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                            05.04.2006 16:53
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                            RSPCA - Help, not a hindrance

                            I have worked at the RSPCA for a school placement and its ridiculous what people see about animals being put to sleep for no reason. This is simply not true. The RSPCA do everything they can to ensure a better life for these unwanted pets. The dogs are walked daily on a field with other dogs, enabling them to socialise and they have strong bonds with the RSPCA workers, this is obvious to see. They are kenelled with other dogs and get much attention from people browsing and the RSPCA workers themselves. They are kept on a strict routine which is obviously essential when caring for a pet. The cats are homed by themselves but when cleaned out, they were able to roam free and gain plenty of fuss from the workers and visitors. These also had strict feeding times. I cared for puppies while there which were able to be handled regularly and let out in a pen to run around. These were particularly popular and tamed so when re-homed, were friendly and trusting. The small pets homed at the RSPCA also lived happily with the rabbits and guineapigs able to run outside. The RSPCA care for their animals extremely well. A lot of the people who work there work there for the love of animals, not for the money. They wouldnt sit back and let these animals be treated badly. The dogs which found it hard to stay there at night were even taken home to the staffs houses, how can this be called mistreating? Absolutely ridiculous.

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                              09.07.2005 00:56
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                              never judge what you see by others, untill you see for youre self.

                              I have been working for the RSPCA for over a year and a half now, and have seen may things in my time whilst working with the RSPCA. But as i read some of you are not at all happy with the RSPCA and its branches. Buti also read some of you think we put down animals in good health, on the contery, we only put down those animals who we belive are seriously ill. The animals in good health but are very agressive, we send them to special centers wich take on certain types of breeds of animals in order to eaither re-home them afterwadrs, or to permantly adopt them into thier centers. We will only put an animal down if a vet agrees that the animal cannot be hepled, under no circumstances will we put down an animal that we think can be hepled and is in good health. I ask you all to take a closer look into this and see for youre selfs that we aren't as bad as some people make out. Also if people took care of thier animals more we wouldnt find our selfs having to put down severly ill treated animals! If you feel we are not doing a good job, i would say to you to try a week at an RSPCA branch and see for youre selfs, how we help and save animals. I think youre veiws on certain comments you have made will change drasticly! Some of you need to understand more about the orgaization before critisizing it, and those who do belive we do good, you thoughts and help are very much abliged.

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                                29.08.2003 14:30
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                                You all know I am an animal lover ,those of you that know me quite well. I know the RSPCA is an organisation that general ,is faultless in its work. Yesterday was different ,and not the norm for Them This is my personal experienvce,and I am still in shock!!!! ********************************************************* I phoned the RSpCA (,animal protection)yesterdaybecause 4 of the Cats have recieved injuries in unusual places .They came today one young woman ,who was, I thought quite rude to me ,she started talking to me as if i was neglecting my Cats even saying do you make sure they have water nearby.I asked Her if she had anymore questions to ask me,she said no.I said would you mind leaving now. Then followed a real fiasco :15 minutes later she came back with a policeman ,and 2 other women ,that turned out to be a nurse and veteriny doctor. I said what do you want ?The policeman said we want to come in to examine your animals,i said Im taking them to a Vet of my choice,the policeman said if you dont let us in I will break in, so I let them in and they all polled into my bedroom ,I nearly had a heart attack.They were all talking to me at once ,I kept on telling them to slow down and not talk to me at once. The RSpCa Inspector had lied to the police saying I wasnt co-operating . I have been using natural methods to get them better and they have been improving . This was all a misuse of power...it was extremly upsetting. Last year Heinde Had 2 injuries first his paw was cut with some kind of weapon ,I got that better with homeopathy,then he came home with His paw covered in tar ..this took me days to remove along with homeopathy .2 others died in mysterious circumstances ((in the past). Hence My call to them....now I have been treated like a criminal. Well what we really have in this experience of mine was an overre-action on the part of this inspector ,she took my anno yance at being asked if I was fulfilling a very basic reqirement ie *do they have access to water *,as a signal that i was going to leave my animals untreated . I always get a vet to diagnose even if i am going to treat them with homeopathy,i have some very good textbooks written by a homepathic vet and have been using herbs and natural treatments for years.With sucess!!! They didnt have to treat me like someone they were investigating when I had sent for them myself,and it put me under a great deal of stress. Well I did take Freebie to the vet today ,reason i didnt before ,we were all knocked out by the heat.Also lack of funds todays treatment cost 20 pounds in Taxi fare and 99 pounds so far no mean amount to find. He has a bone tumour ,,I have 2 options : to have Him put to sleep ,or for him to have a new treatment in the UK ,already tried and tested in the U.S.it makes cancerous cells revert back to normal . in Humans and animals. I am taking the second ,of course if he takes a turn for the worse I will take the first. I do think He had an injury that turned cancerous,it has improved since my use of homeopathy and a theraputic magnet,the swelling has halved in size . 2 of the other had loss of fur overnight on He rear end ,as if shaved,and the other has has a swelling on Her tum...all there injuries happened together thats why I called the Royal Society for the protection of Animals in. i have spoken on the phone since to this Inspector and she said the society might help with some of the expence ,ofthe vets bill. i suppose alls well that ends well . For our friends in other Countries The RSPCA do investigate animal cruelty,and generally do a great job . if a domestic animal is found abandoned animal,they rescue ,and re-home it. it depends on other wildlife societies like *Carla lanes animal sanctuary *to help wounded birds etc .i have taken a Ja y and a fieldmouse to Her . She is in great need of funds at the moment .I will put Her address up soon . ****************Update;Tues 2nd Sept 2003.********************* I had a home visit from the Vet and a nurse they said they were pleased to see Freebie has improved after Silicea 200 the there is less swelling and He has been running around. Molly also was better today . Heindies wound has healed now. Fluffy certainly has no flea allergy .She has been sweating profusely ,and has something that looks like glue in Her fur it could be bad scurfing ..I have been giving Her charcoal daily to remove poison ,I have had a sample of Her blood removed pending investigation,from I hope Sidneygee as He is an expert . Also a sample of Freebies blood which is being sent to a laboratory pending Him having a new treatment in the UK. The post delivered it too late:I had Freebie on a special diet ,and hoeopathic remedies known to treat bone Cancer .Osteosarcoma is the hardest Cancer to treat. We had a mobile mast near su for a year ,and dont forget an animal has less body size so they succumb to Cancer quicker. That is why i couldnt ultimately save Him from this perniceous disease ...the reason why His death took me by suprise is that homeopathic remedies can suddenly give the animal a quick death if there is no more hope,He only took 5 sconds to die with my comforting hand stroking him and Arsen Alb to take away his fear ...how i still grieve for him. I have a ruling: If any of the cats detiorirate they will have other treatment . I love animals so much i took a stray cat for treatment recently ,and also took a squirrel that was injured paying for this out of my own pocket (in the past.) to be cont update on this opinion:Because of incorrect data being put on my Vets treatment report Subsequent to my beloved Cats death ,one of my cats that has an allergy ha s been tak en away fr om me .I am now trying to clear my name ,the Vet has helped me by amending this report .In this polluted world ,skin trouble in cats does not necessarily mean neglect . Particularly dioxins which cause a condition called Chloracne which causes great loss of fur. The amount of bonfires and fireworks used in this small country of ours up the level of this terrible poison. *********************************************************************** Another possibility is contact with an irritant ,my garden contains Ivy i did wonder if it could have been a poison of some kind I originally called the RSpCA in because they developed these symptoms overnight.Also I have had roadworks round me for about 3 years,so think about the result of this pollution on an animal...Lead and Sulphur ,and carbon monoxide,no wonder our animals are dieing!!! *********************************************************************** ********** * I know this organisation that has the Queen as its patron does admirable work ,but mistakes can be made in this case a grave mistake has been made ...as they are treating me as someone who neglects their animals ...you only have to look at my homepage to see this is untrue,I hope that soon this mistake can be rectified as i am innocent . Freebie unfortunately died from his very aggressive bone Cancer the other Sunday He took a sudden turn for the worse ,so I rang for Euthanasia,He died before the vet got here ,He just took 5 seconds to die ,with 5 short fits. The vet that came a woman put down an erroneous report ,saying that he was fitting and dying all day :totally untrue!!!! The vet that had been helping me previous to this has ammended the report. This has set up a chain of events,that have left me falsely accused and one of my cats has been taken away from me ,I hope to have Her returned under the P.A.C.E laws ,a soliciter is writing to the RSPCA f luffy has had b ad fur loss and been shaved ,thats why I called them in .I fleacombed Her before this happened for an hour and only yeilded one flea.I am terribly upset . My cats have always been well cared for. I have written a poem about it : My Prayer tonight is for all the falsely accused people throughout the World, Some lose children ,animals ,and their dignity and good reputation . Law misused ,law abused ,by people that refuse to listen. Oh the faces that look to God,on which tears do glisten. I am like Rachel weeping for my child, in the form of a sensitive beautiful black cat called Fluffy,where are you my little black girl. Fluffy was returned to me tonight ,Her fur has regrown so thankyou RSPCA ,aand I have agreed to use homeopathy and orthodox medicine ,because in this polluted world our animals have a fight on their hands to stay healthy . I hope fireworks are banned from being used only on very special ocaisions. Motorists please dont run your engines unnessesarily ,save a life in not doing so animal and human.

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