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Territorial Army (TA)

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      19.03.2009 23:06
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      so there!

      i think you (ex cpl RE) should be ashamed. Women play a big part in the armed forces, any corps should have women, infantry have women as medics, clerks, chefs etc thats right its the way it should be. i think youre a sad man, who obviosly doesnt get any attention from women especially the ones in green, which is why you have to say that. Iam in the RE, yes at the moment iam a stab, but i work full time for them. which i have done for 3/4 of the time i have served. i am in the process of joining the regular army, and iam easily qualified for jobs in RE regular. As iam a qualified draughsman and the skill does transfer to draughsman RE class 2 or 1 equivilent. Thats probably more than you can say. I think you should give women in the forces more credit, stop being a mong, maybe youre a walt (im not sure) but wind your neck in....it may help.

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        15.10.2008 16:05
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        The Territorial Army.

        When I went into my 5th year at University, I was getting a bit sick and tired of supporting myself financially by doing the regular, boring, dead-end part-time jobs that students usually get. I'd heard of the Officer Training Corps and although I'd always fancied myself as a bit of a G.I. Jane type, I also figured that I wasn't cut out for it at all. I went along to the open night, however, just to be nosy, and ended up joining up which was the best decision of my life.

        The OTC is classified as Territorial Army, but is classified as Class B, therefore it is very unlikely that anyone that was part of it would ever be called up. Also, you can only join if you are a student and are under the age of 30. It is, however, an excellent opportunity to do a bit of military training without being under any obligation. You don't need to sign up for a specific length of time and can discharge yourself at any time and are under no obligation to follow a military career after you graduate. You get paid for the training that you undertake, although, admittedly the pay is low, even by army standards. However, the opportunities given are so great that I'm sure most OTC cadets would gladly still participate even without pay.

        I joined up as a shy, unfit young woman, who was completely clueless about the army. I didn't come from a military family, had never been an Army cadet in my school days and was completely unaccustomed to any kind of 'green kit' training. During my first year with the OTC, I completed what basically boils down to basic training.

        The beauty of the OTC is that it is designed to cater to students. The officers in charge of the Corps are well aware that the cadets have exams, essays and coursework to work on and therefore might find it difficult to commit themselves to training at times, especially during the exam period. Therefore, the structure of the training is designed to accommodate students as best as possible, keeping training to a minimum at busy times in the academic calendar.

        Training is varied. First year training includes training in weapons handling, battlefield first aid, the structure of the British Army, map-reading, physical training and much more. The second and third years are geared more towards training cadets to be potential officers and cadets are encouraged and aided on their way if they want to pursue a commission either as a Class A or B TA officer, or indeed, a regular officer.

        TA training has you experiencing things that you would rarely experience anywhere else. Admittedly, sometimes these aren't the most pleasant of experiences at the time. When you're tired and cold out on exercise, living off ration packs and having to carry around a heavy bergen, it can sometimes seem like its not worth it, but afterwards the sense of achievement is huge. Your physical fitness will improve drastically, especially if you commit yourself to work on it on your own time, away from your unit. You will become more confident as you achieve things you didn't think possible and as you spend time honing your team work and/or leadership skills.

        The TA also provides plenty of opportunities for other activities that you'd pay a fortune to participate in outside of the army. For example, skiing trips and other adventure training such as hill walking and mountain biking are often arranged. As a TA soldier you can apply to go on courses such as First Aid training, parachuting courses, Mountain Leader training courses and Driving courses.

        The army, is however, relying on its Territorial soldiers more and more these days to serve in conflicts and unlike the OTC, most TA units will be required to serve at some point and it is certainly worth considering whether you would be willing to do this before you join, but there certainly is great benefits to the TA if you do decide to sign up, both financially and otherwise.

        The TA provides lots of different options, also. For students, you can join the OTC like I did and be able to train without having to commit yourself. There is, of course, the Class A TA units and there's sure to be one near you. For those too old to sign up to the TA or more interested in youth work, you could even consider signing up as an Army Cadet instructor which is also a TA (Class B) role.

        Its both a job and a hobby amd you'll gain a huge amount from it. I definately recommend going along to your local TA unit to find out more if you are interested.

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          12.10.2007 02:33

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          oh well ,wot are u all going on about yah mate meet me in the field then? and see whot a woman can dooooo; ha ha ,my cilt is biger than your balls,so wot and were not 10000% brithish

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          19.07.2002 19:32
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          • "Employer might have hang-ups about it"

          After spending the night under a poncho that was suspended from bungee's and sleeping on a flimsy roll mat, I was not fully refreshed and ready for action when I crawled out from under the basha. However, a few cups of ration tea later and a barely cooked breakfast I was packed, locked and cocked ready for another full day at the "office". The troops had already been assembled thanks to my Platoon Sergeant and we were trudging along a snow covered Scottish hillside up by Aylth, NW of Dundee. We were heading out to attack a few positions, perform a recce and set up an ambush. The weather was not in our favour. Snow saturated our combats as we lay on our belt buckles and re-froze when we marched on. Our water bottles had frozen and our only saving grace was that this was the last day of the weekend. Tomorrow, we would all be back in our civvi reality and back to 5-star comfort (in comparison). Each of us all yearned for a dry pair of socks and a hot meal. We never spoke of this but we all felt the same need. A common thought that made us feel warm thinking about it and motivated us in the simplest way. Suddenly, there was the resounding crack of a GPMG "suppressing the enemy", we had been caught out by our opposing force on-route to our location. Our standing orders were that we were to ditch our bergens if we came under enemy fire and neutralise the threat so that the following platoons had safe passage. This is not easy when you are frozen to the bone, you are on your belt buckle, you have a radio and you are soaking wet. Not to mention that you are screaming commands at the top of your voice over a deafening cacophony of machine gun fire and you are trying to figure out where you are coming under fire from and how to start digging your way out this. Soon enough though, the enemy position was located and the team went to work. We took the position and secured the area. A report w
          as sent in and we recuperated a brief moment to regain composure and try to take in some fluids. We set off again along the rugged hillside, sweating and warm and knowing that this heat was only temporary and would return to freezing cold numbness shortly. True enough, by the time we reached our RV point, we were all feeling the effects of nature trying to deter us. Our legs, aching from a tactical advance with bergens on, were feeling numb and exhausted. We knew that we had to carry on and show each other that we felt no weakness. That we were able to carry on through this and prove to the DS (directing staff) that we were more than capable of hacking the pace at RMA Sandhurst. Fortunately enough, only two had dropped out by the time we reached our harbour area. All of us, physically exhausted and shivering could not have been more relieved when the 4-tonner drew up and the reality of "End-Ex" sunk in. Only a few hours later, a dry pair of socks and a hot meal would await us at home. We would be comfortable again. There is no feeling like this. Getting down and dirty, mucking in and getting along as a team and achieving your objectives as a single unit. Being able to do what most civilians cannot do and know that to appreciate creature comforts, like hot water, dry clothes and warm food, you have to experience the discomfort and primitive living of being in the field. Being in the field is not about roughing it. A fool roughs it. A wise man will prepare and make life as comfortable as possible for himself and his men. Simple things can make a big difference. If you are thinking about joining the TA - Don?t. Just do it! (Sorry Nike)

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            27.03.2002 16:26
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            I've been in the TA over seven years now and my attitude to it has developed the whole time. When I first joined it was because a friend persuaded me to go along, I was at college and not at all interested in the military but I went along out of curiousity. What I found was a group of people from all sorts of different backgrounds who have a sense of adventure, want to do something constructive with their spare time and develop themselves personally. In my unit there are plumbers, IT experts, motorcycle couriers, students, a millionaire, psychiatrists, and loads more. The first few years to me it was just a hobby (although you get paid for it) - you go along one evening per week and roughly one weekend per month. The money doesn't start off being that good, but you get your travel, meals, uniform etc paid for so it doesn't cost you anything and you save money by going on weekend training because it stops you spending too much. After a year or two though the money gets good enough to make you a couple of grand better off a year. By joining the TA you are enabling the Army to send you off to war in the event of a national emergency - something that rarely happens as it costs the government loads to send the TA compared to the regular Army. What you get out of it is not just the money, but a huge sense of personal achievement and camaraderie. Sometimes you think "why the hell am I doing this when I could be sat in the pub" - normally when you're on exercise and it's freezing cold and wet, but more frequently you'll be doing something new and exciting (parachute jumps, obstacle courses, fighting in urban areas) - mostly things that you can only do in the Army (ie. not toned-down civvie versions) and you know exactly why you're in. The TA is different things to do different people - some are in it for a laugh and like the social aspects, some like to push themselves physically and enter all the com
            petitions etc, some like the military side of it and get on weapons training and so on. There's almost certainly at least one aspect you'll be interested in and there is the opportunity to go on courses in that subject and train others. I've recently done a course in teaching (getting an NVQ too) and become a physical training instructor - nothing to do with guns, combat or shouting at people! What you end up doing depends on the unit too - an infantry unit will do very different training to a field hospital unit for instance. Many people think they know what the Army is all about and that it's not for them, but when they actually give it a try they find all sorts of aspects to it that they never even considered - I know I did.

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              18.02.2002 04:10
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              This opinion may offend. As a former member of the regular and terrortorial army (CORPORAL, CORPS ROYAL ENGINEERS) I have come to the conclusion that the whole spirit of the S.T.A.B.s has been taken away. This has happened because of two reasons. The first one is the influx of women into teeth arms, if women want to play soldiers they should, either join the ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS or buy an action man. The efficency of a section / troop squadron and possibly even a regiment, is dictated by it's weakest link. A woman does not have the ability or the aggressive motivation, eg, a woman is not capable of man-packing Milan or Gimpy to a location, or being a panel member of a panel section on a bridge. If women must be employed in the T.A. they should be kept well back in B-ECHLON where they are nice and safe and can't hinder anyone. The second reason is, there are too many people becoming S.T.A.B.s and thinking themselves as regular amy soldiers (A.R.A.B.s). In the past, you became a S.T.A.B. For the beer and the money. Don't get me wrong, Iv'e got nothing against S.T.A.B.s, I used to be one. The T.A. helped win the last TWO WORLD WARs, so if you have any sense, join a regiment where there is no women and lots of and you may just discover what being a S.T.A.B. is all about. Always remember what the unofficial moto of the T.A. is - WE'RE ONLY HERE FOR THE BEER.

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                16.06.2001 15:48
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                Having served in the Royal Corps of Signals for over 15 years I have seen massive changes in both the soldiers and the technology that they use. When I first joined the discipline was far harsher than it is now, you would not say anything unless spoken to, and then it still might get you into trouble! Nowadays the recruit is far more questioning, which can be a good thing, as long as when the time comes they know when to stop the questions and just do the do! We have a lower level of fitness now as well but this is probably due to the computer generation that is now emerging, the days of playing football as a child seem to be dwindling. As for technology, my Corps is now at the forefront of leading edge communications. Gone are most of the cables, and satellite and radio and microwave are the way ahead. All this adds up to a worthwile career in the Royal Corps of Signals, there are places all over the world to be sent, such as Bosnia, Kosovo, America,Canada, Germany,Russia,Gibralter, Northern Ireland,Australia, to name but a few. so if travel and experience of both a different life and modern technology is what you want then come have a look at the Royal Corps of Signals. Finally a few pointers as too what you need to join, and also what you can expect to receive. for the technical trades you will need maths and english, with physics being a distinct advantage. for many of the other trades, driver, storeman, radio op, then just an aptitude for that kind of work is all that is needed. as to rewards, well as a corporal I am on 57 pounds a day, and that is payed 7 days a week, whether i work them or not! but starting wage is about 30 pounds a day, not bad in this unhealthy financial climate. Not to forget 6 weeks paid holiday a year and all the bank holidays too! So go on check out the Royal Signals.

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              • Product Details

                There are over 40,000 members of the TA, providing one quarter of the total strength of the British Army. There are lots of different units with different commitment and various roles for potential members to choose