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Bob Martin Cat Wormer Granules

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5 Reviews

Brand: Bob Martin / Animals Equipment Type: Wormer

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    5 Reviews
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      30.04.2012 17:23
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      A fantastic Bob Martin product!

      Being owned by a cat (or at least that's how it feels!) means that we have several things that we need to do monthly to keep her body in prime condition. We treat her with flea prevention products (to make sure she stays flea free) and we use a dewormer to ensure that she stays healthy on the inside too. Our cat does not go outside but I understand that cats can pick up worms at any time so I am always going to treat her just like I would an outside cat (this includes having all her vaccinations done too).

      Bob Martin is a name that I have not always had success with but when it comes to worming tablets and treatments I have used them on and off over the past 18 months with my cat only knowingly having passed a worm after use on one occasion. Because my cat has been healthy and gained weight (despite a heart problem) we have returned back to using Bob Martin time and time again.

      In the past we have used tablets because I feared that granules would not work but when my cat took her dislike of tablets even further and threw one up a moment or two after eating it I decided to look at some of the other options available to me. These granules stood out to me and for £3.90 in my local Sainsburys store for 3 months supply (for my lightweight cat) I decided that this was a very reasonable price and went ahead with buying them.

      The idea behind these granules is very simple. Weigh your cat (mine weighs around 5-6lbs) and then using the guideline on the back of the packet to tell you how many sachets you should be using. As my cat is on the cusp of the second level I decided to stick with the lower dosage of one sachet. This was then very simple to use. Just open the sachet, sprinkle it on to 1/3 of the food, feed to your cat and then once they have eaten that allow them to have the rest of their food. Obviously this is a very simple concept and I ensured that my cat was kept occupied while I was preparing this just in case she could see something different going on (I may be crazy - I don't know!). I then sat her usual bowl down on her food mat and she set about eating it right away just as she would normally. She did leave a little bit of her food after a few minutes but then about 20 minutes later she returned to this and finished it all off (even licking the bowl clean). I then followed the directions on the packaging and allowed her to have the other 2/3 of her dinner. She picked at this for a couple of hours, like she usually does, before finishing this off too.

      Overall we have been very pleased with these granules. Our cat appears to have quite a delicate stomach and because of her heart condition she sometimes can have problems eating all of her food and putting on weight. She can also be incredibly fussy and sometimes will turn against much loved brands of cat food for completely no reason and despite having lots of variety for dinner every day she will turn her nose up at food randomly and decide not to eat much for a day or two. I did worry that these granules would put her off her dinner but she ate very well each time we needed to use these granules and despite worrying the first time when she didn't eat all of her dinner she has not turned her nose up to a meal containing these once.

      Our cat has regular visits to the vet and our vet seems confident with the products that we are using to keep our cat in tip top condition. We have had no stomach troubles when feeding our cat these granules and they are very simple to use once a month. The price of these granules seems reasonable to me and while they are towards the higher end of deworming products available in our local supermarket our cat does not appear to have a problem with worms so if she is coming in to contact with any nasties it seems to be keeping them at bay.

      I would have no hesitation in recommending these granules and will definitely use them again in the future for my fussy little eater!

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        06.08.2008 14:32
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        dont waste your time or money

        Well as I have 5 cats - 3 of those are rescued cats I know only too well how important it is to worm your cat on a regular basis - especially now we have a new baby in the house. Worms are horrid things (ive had them as a child), i cant imagine how bad they must be for a cat especially how easily they are caught from rodent, birds, rabbits (in my cats case), which your cats love to bring in the house.
        Ive tried these granules on all of my cats and ive tried everything to make my cats eat the food with no success what so ever! The cats know as soon as you put the food in front of it. Not that my cats are particulary fussy but they will not touch any food that has been tampered with. So in my opinion its just a complete waste of money and id recommend a wormer in tablet form or drops on the back of the neck (2 of mine savage me when i try to get the tablet down so use drops)

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        30.07.2008 18:54
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        No use at all as the cat couldn't eat them without being sick!

        As you probably know we have been adopted by a stray adult cat who is now called Mew - mainly because I asked him what his name was and he said 'Mew'!

        Anyway the other day we noticed white strands on his fur near his bottom. We realised that these were worms although what we didn't realise until we did a bit of investigation that cats need to be dewormed regularly - we're still learning feline husbandry!

        I took a look at the products available in Asda and chose Bob Martin Dewormer Granules at £3.78 for a small box containing three sachets. I was familiar with the name Bob Martin and assumed that this would be a quality product.

        The box has changed since this product was set up and is now pale blue with a purple silhouette of a cat on the front with the words 'Bob Martin easy to use Dewormer Granules. Just sprinkle on your cat's food.'

        1g of the granules contains 225mg of fenbendazole which is apparently the active ingredient which will kill roundworm and roundworm eggs inside the cat.

        The information on the back of the box made it sound really easy to use. There was also an information leaflet inside which gave the same instructions but the writing is bigger and easier to read!

        Firstly we had to weigh Mew to make sure that we gave him the right dose for his weight. I did this by getting on the bathroom scales holding Mew in my arms and again without holding Mew and then I just subtracted one weight from the other thus finding out that Mew weighed 11 pounds.

        Cats up to 5 pounds need one sachet, cats between 5 and 10 pounds need two sachets and cats over 10 pounds need all three sachets. It was going to work out expensive if we did this every three months as it is suggested on the box. Still, if it works, it's worth it for Mew.

        The instructions on the leaflet inside the box tell you to sprinkle the whole dose - three sachets in our case - onto one third of the cat's normal food ration and to mix it up. I thought from this that the granules would be brown in colour and maybe flavoured in some way so that the cat wouldn't notice them. How wrong I was! The granules are white so the small amount of food covered and mixed with three sachets of these granules looked awful!

        Mew was not impressed and I can't say that I blame him!

        Credit where it is due Mew had a go and ate a bit of his food with the granules and within minutes he was sick! Again having looked at the amount of granules compared to the amount of food I am not surprised really.

        We just threw the rest away and will take advice as to what products are out there on the market that will work and that the cat can eat without making him ill.

        We did put some fresh food out for him but he was very wary and didn't actually eat any of it today - mind you he did go out and catch himself a mouse instead!

        I shall be writing to Bob Martin to get my money back, but in the mean time if anyone knows of a product that works please do leave me a message. I would be very grateful.

        By the way the one star given is too many in my opinion!

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          23.03.2008 08:42
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          RECOMMENDED xx

          Have you ever tried to give a cat a tablet? I have and I still bear the scars, so I decided I needed to find a different way to make sure my old cat Guinness, did not suffer with any unwanted visitors in his guts!

          Guinness, you see, is a prolific hunter. He loves nothing better than a good old stalk, pounce and play with his prey, before eating it down - every last scrap. I am not kidding you - he eats every last morsel and this is the reason I have to be careful with worm prevention.

          I decided to try a wormer granule that is available to buy in Sainsbury's. I was not really very optimistic as I had had experience with Bob Martin products before with mixed results. However, nothing ventured nothing gained and all that so I popped them in my trolley.

          When I got home I followed the instructions at dinner time (Guinness's not mine!) and sprinkled on the sachets of granules to about a third of his dinner. I was sceptical that he would eat it as he seems to detect anything foreign in his food and refuse to eat, looking at me with big eyes. But I was completely shocked and taken by surprise when he went to his bowl, had a quick sniff and wolfed the lot down. I happily gave him the rest of his dinner feeling quite triumphant and unhurt for a change.

          Bob Martin recommends you give this treatment to your cat every three months, and we have been doing so for quite a while now. I am pleased to report there are no symptoms of any worms in my old hunters belly and he is certainly not off his normal food or anything else he chooses to consume to supplement his diet!

          These cost me just under a fiver for three sachets and he has two every time he is wormed but as this is only every three months it is still economical and for me the best part is that I do not get scratched to pieces trying to get a tablet down his neck that he really doesn't want me to be putting there.

          The granules offer protection from roundworm and roundworm eggs, so if you were looking for protection against other worms like tape work for instance, these are not the best thing. Bear in mind this is a medicinal treatment and therefore should be kept away from children and used with care while administering it. Wash your hands afterwards and try not to breath in any granule dust when you are sprinkling it on your cat's food. If you are at all worried about your cat though I would suggest a visit to your vet to be on the safe side.

          These granules are perfectly OK for kittens aged 3-6 months as well so if you wanted to start your little moggy early on worm prevention, these will do fine.

          For a wiggler free tummy, I have found these to be just the job.

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            01.10.2007 20:35
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            Not as succesfull as i'd hoped they would be, next time i'll stick to traditional methods.

            Just after we moved into our new home we saw a new addition to the family, we were finally allowed to have pets and so as a surprise my mum bought us Marty. A cute little tabby kitten. He was only 10 weeks old and hadn't had the best of starts in life, but he was part of our family now and we would look after him properly. When he reached 3 months old it came time for worming Marty and so we looked for a suitable product to do the job.

            Why worm?
            It is important for the sake of your cats' health to worm them. Many cats infected with worms will not show any signs, however, a lot of worms can cause weight loss, vomiting or diarrhoea, irritation around the rear end, and failure to thrive particularly in kittens. Roundworms are very common in kittens although Tapeworms are more common in adult cats. Roundworm larva can also infect humans, occasionally children who ingest the eggs can suffer eye damage or blindness as a result of the worm larvae moving through the body causing damage to the tissues. Tapeworm infection is less common but can occur as the result of accidentally ingesting a flea that contains the larvae of a Tapeworm.


            Bob Martin De-wormer Granules-
            Bob Martin worming granules is a treatment for cats over the age of 3 months, specialist treatments can be found for younger cats and particularly small kittens however this one is not recommended. The box consists of 3 sachets of the treatment and are intended for use over a period of 3 days.

            The wormer is in granule form, a fine white powder designed to sprinkle over or mix in with your cat or kittens food. One sachet is to be used every 24 hours until the treatment is complete. Instructions are supplied both on the box and in the form of a small leaflet to ensure proper use of the treatment.

            There is quite an amount of packaging to the treatment considering it is only for a course of 3 days, the sachets are individual and alongside the leaflet come in a card box which could contain at least 6 of the treatments and still have room left over. Considering the instructions are printed on the box the leaflet is not exactly necessary. It is advised that you try not to come into contact with the granules and wash your hands after dealing with a sachet.


            Price & availability-
            The granules are available from pet stores and super markets as well as many online stores. I purchased Martys course of treatment from Asda for £3.39 but prices do vary.


            Our Experience-
            I had never had to treat a cat before, although I've had cats before my mum had always taken care of it, Marty is the first pet we've been able to raise in our own home. Because of this I waited until he was old enough to have the treatment and then followed the 24 hour interval instructions, putting his first treatment in his supper, I chose this meal because I knew he would not be able to get out of the house during the night, that way if he produced any worms I would be able to monitor it, I also knew that he was more likely to finish off his food at that meal time ensuring he took the whole round of treatment.

            I tore open the sachet adding the granules to his food and then mixing them in completely so he would not see them. He nibbled the first of the food but soon turned his nose up at it wandering off to his bed, I presumed he was simply not hungry and left him to it, yet the next morning the food was still there. I didn't want to give him a fresh meal because I knew he would not get his treatment and I couldn't add another sachet so soon, so I mixed a little ham and fresh meat into his dish in hopes that he would finish off the rest of the previous food. I had no luck though and he managed to eat the ham and leave the rest.

            I decided to seek a little advice and was told to not feed him until he was due his next treatment and so poor little Marty went the rest of the day without food. Supper time came once again but there was no change, he obviously knew the granules were in the food, I'd mixed it in well and used a lamb and gravy cat food for him (his favourite) but he just wasn't interested. The third treatment went the same way, he'd get through about ½ the dish through pure hunger but would not complete the dish.

            Through all of this I changed his dirt tray completely after every use so I could keep an eye on what he was producing (nice job eh!) as well as ensure any worms that might be produced were immediately disposed of. I know he took at least some of the treatment in as there was a distinct change in the dirt trays contents, there were no worms but then he probably didn't have any in the first place, still you have to treat them just in case they might.

            Once the treatment was finished he went back to his usual eating habits, clearing his meals 4 times a day. No matter what I had tried, to get him to eat the food with granules in, I didn't succeed. The poor little guy had been reduced to one meal a day for those last 2 days so it's no wonder he was so hungry yet he simply would not finish a meal containing the granules, I hadn't even increased the portion sizes I had given him exactly the same as he'd been used to. They are meant to be easily disguised but my little Marty was smart enough to detect them, I'm sure we would have had far less trouble with the traditional tablet form of worm treatment then we did with the granules. I will leave him a few months and the try a different form of worm treatment, it is advised cats are treated every 3 months anyway, this time though I'll be sure to try a different method.

            If the granules had worked and not been detected then this could have been a great form of worming treatment, simple to administer with minimal distress for the cat, however they weren't as "invisible" as I'd hoped and Marty probably ended off worse off by using this product. Overall I would not recommend this form of treatment, I have heard there are drops which can be used for worming as well as the traditional tablets and I would use those rather than the granules if I was to go back and do it all again.

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