Welcome! Log in or Register

Canac Activity Ball

  • image
4 Reviews
  • Use only dry food
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    4 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      19.10.2008 20:31
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Great for amusing hyper dogs

      We bought one of these for our Springer spaniel puppy when he was about 6 months old and he loved it. We fill the ball up every morning with his dog food (James Welbeloved dry food) I bought a funnel to make filling it very easy. Our dog then spends the next 4 hours well I am at work trying to get his breakfast out usually when I arrive home he has successfully emptied the ball.

      Before we bough our dog one of these balls he was getting into mischief while I was at work chewing shoes pulling stuff out etc. the biscuit ball seems to have given him something more positive to focus on while we are out. To be honest the dog biscuit ball has made a huge different to our dog as we were running out of ideas to stop him destroying stuff while we are out.

      When I am home at the weekends I still use the ball and he spends hours rolling it around to get the treats out it is very amusing to watch as he using his nose and feet to control the ball.

      This is the perfect thing to have if you own a dog that gets easily bored and need to be kept busy.

      The only thing I would say is look at the size of the whole compared to the food you are using, as some biscuits are bigger than others are. The whole in our ball is about the same size as a 2p. Also if you force treats in that are to big they will get stuck inside the ball and stink.

      This ball is worth it's weigh in gold if you have a hyper dog please get one!!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        06.09.2007 23:22
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Great dog toy, a must for any dogs toy box!

        Treat Ball, great invention let me tell you.

        It's a average sized hollow ball that you fill with your dogs favourite biscuits, place the little stopper (which has 2 holes in the sides for the treats to fall out of) into the ball and watch your dogs enjoy.

        My Dogs love it, it releases the treats as they bat and nose it around but the good thing is that it isn't too easy, so your dogs won't have a pile of biscuits as once fall out, and it isn't too hard so they get bored, very clever!

        The toy is very safe aswell, the stopper is tightly secure by you so theres no choking hazard, they can't crunch or chew pieces of plastic of, infact I've had mine about 6 months and there isn't even tooth damage, it's put up which being smacked around into walls and fences, and it's fine, believe me my 2 dogs have really put this toy through the endurance test!

        Like I said before the stopper is securly placed in by you, so theres no chance of your dog getting his or her nose stuck in the whole! It's a very safety concious toy!

        Not that this toy needs it often, but when it does need cleaning it's easy, just take the stopper out and give it a shake, wipe the outside, and it's done!

        Great price aswell, I paid £5.00 for mine from tesco, but I have noticed that they have gone down to £3.99, fantastic price, this is not the kind of toy you'll need to replace it's very hardy!

        My dogs love it, they spend a long time playing with it so I would reccomend this toy to any dog owner for £3.99 give it a try to see if your dog can find a favourite toy in the treat ball, like my two have!

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          29.05.2002 22:52
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          22 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Skittle and Mokee. Means nothing to most of you (unless you're in the habit of reading my opinions, or you happened to read my profile before reading this!). But say Skittle or Mokee to me and you?ll wish you hadn't! Mention my dogs and you'll have to sit there pretending to listen as I drivel on for hours about how a photo of Mokee has won the readers pets competition on some website or other this month (and won enough food to keep her and her 'canine' sister well fed for ages, I'll have you know!) Or how Skittle has finally learnt to put her toy in my hand when we're playing fetch instead of dropping it in the mud at my feet (thought it was a brilliant idea when I taught her it, soon began to see the error of my ways the first time she brought me her ball covered in, erm, shall we call it 'doggy mud...') Pity my poor husband, you don't have to read my opinion if you don't want to, he's stuck with listening to me twitter on about my dogs all day every day... So, you've gathered that my dogs are really very special to me. I love them to bits and want only the very best for them. So, last year when I was made redundant and had to take a proper job (ie normal office hours instead of the shifts I had been working) I was worried sick about how my two girls were going to cope on their own all day. Thing is, Mokee is a little bit, shall we say, dopey... Think somewhere between Santa's Little Helper (from the Simpsons) and Digby (the biggest dog in the world) and you're at about the right level of intelligence (but WAY too big, she's only an ickle dog, you know!) I knew that so long as she was with Skittle she'd be perfectly happy wherever they where and what ever they happened to be doing. She's very easily amused! Skittle, on the other hand, is a Border Collie. Now, to those of you who have never owned one of these beautiful dogs, that comment probably
          means very little, but anybody who has ever owned a Collie knows that they need constant mental stimulation as well as a very physically active lifestyle. Being locked in a house all day with nothing to amuse her just was not going to work for Skittle, no way no how. Enter the Canac Activity Ball... I'd been looking for one of these for a very long time, ever since reading a marvellous opinion on this very site written by an incredibly intelligent young lady called Rosie (who types very well, considering she has no opposable thumbs!) Now, although Rosie's experience of the Canac Activity Ball was not the best, I felt sure that this item (for I feel that calling it a toy does not do it justice) would be perfect for Skittle and Mo. I finally tracked down a Canac Activity Ball in my local pet store two or three months ago, only to find when I got it home that the ball they are selling nowadays bears very little resemblance to the Canac Activity Ball of yesteryear (other than the fact that they're both balls and both made of very hard plastic, of course?) The ball that Rosie described and that I myself have seen in the past has quite a complicated internal mechanism described very well in SueMagee's op, so I won't go into it again here. Suffice to say that it didn't work particularly well. Food would often get stuck inside the ball and the external locking device could very easily be removed by an intelligent dog (or even an unintelligent dog, with enough brute force) and chewed, therefore rendering the toy completely useless, never mind endangering the dog. The new Canac design, however, has taken the idea behind a treat ball back to it's most basic level. Gone is the intricate, treat-delivering mechanism which didn't work very well anyway, and in it's place are two holes. Yes, that's right, the Canac Activity Ball is actually a large, hard plastic ball with two holes in it, and believe it o
          r not it actually works very well! The basic idea behind the new, improved Canac Activity ball is that you put small treats inside the ball through one of the holes, you then give the ball to your dog and off they go. Easy. In fact, so simple that I think Canac may very well have achieved perfection with the new, improved Activity Ball. Take one dog, give it a ball full of treats, dog plays with ball and eats treats. Marvellous! However, When I first brought this home and poured in the free bag of treats that every Canac Activity Ball comes supplied with, I did wonder if I hadn't just made quite an expensive mistake. £8.99, whilst not being a lot of money for a toy if it works, is an awful lot of money for a toy that my fickle dogs take one look at then ignore (and it's happened in the past, believe me, the Kong Toy I bought them for Christmas was treated with utter disdain, and now languishes, forgotten, at the bottom of their toy stash, I never did figure out why!) However, I needn't have worried. Once Skittle figured out that this new plaything didn't just smell of food, it actually gave you food when you pushed it with your nose, she was away! That was when I discovered the unusual side effects of the Canac Activity Ball. You see, the thing about Skittle is that although, like all Border Collies, she?s incredibly intelligent, she's also got some very odd eccentricities. One of these has always been that she enjoys vacuuming. Of course, it's me that's actually doing the vacuuming, not Skittle (she's clever, but she's not THAT clever) but Skittle likes nothing better than to 'encourage' the vacuum cleaner by prancing about in front of it barking at in a playful way. The Canac Activity ball, it appears, reminds Skittle somewhat of the vacuum cleaner. So, gentle reader, I'm sure you can picture the scene (or should that be imagine the racket?) when Skittle plays with her activity ba
          ll. Of course, the ball doesn't always give Skittle treats when she wants them, that's when she attacks it with tooth and claw (basically rams it into a corner and scratches at it like she's trying to dig her way in, barking all the time) yet still there isn't a mark on it. My skirting boards, however, are telling a different story... What with the prancing, the barking, and the ramming of the ball up against the skirting boards, the Canac Activity Ball is not the quietist of toys for Skittle to play with. In fact, I would go so far as to say that I wouldn't allow Skittle to play with her activity ball whilst I was in the house, it's just too noisy. The blurb on the box says that the Canac Activity Ball "stimulates and exercises dogs mentally and physically. Helps behavioural problems through play and exercise. Relieves Boredom. Encourages natural foraging instincts, blah, blah, blah" OK, so they harp on about it a bit, but it is actually true. I've seen this toy keep Skittle occupied for the best part of an hour, trying to get the treats out of it, and she'll keep going back to it time and again until she's removed every last one. The blurb continues on the front of the box "Canac Activity Ball, the fun exercise toy for dogs. Play with the ball and watch the treats fall out. Highly recommended by Animal Behaviourist, Dr Peter Neville". Who? (I didn't know who Dr Peter Neville was either). Further investigation revealed that he is actually a well-respected Animal Behaviourist in this very country, if you want to read any more about his qualifications and decide for yourself if you should trust his "recommendation" of the Canac Activity Ball you can do so on his own website www.pets.f9.co.uk However, I did think it a little odd that as an Animal Behaviourist who "recommends" the Canac Activity Ball he's selling a very similar, but essentiall
          y different product on his own website, which he also "recommends". Hm, think I'll leave that one right there... Anyway, on with the opinion. The Canac Activity Ball is available in two sizes. The large one, which I bought, is perfect for my Border Collie and would be fine even for very large breeds of dog. I'm sure that even an Irish Wolfhound would struggle to get this ball into it's mouth, it really is quite large. However, if you have a toy or miniature dog the Activity Ball is also made in a medium size, perfect for small yapper-type dogs! Skittle and Mo's Activity ball is half blue and half red, the same as the ball on the Canac packaging, but if this colour-scheme doesn't fit in with your décor, the ball is also available in other colour variations such as green and red. The ball is made of very tough plastic and I don't think you need to worry too much about leaving this with a destructive dog, as there are no longer any moving parts it is now virtually indestructible. There are no warnings on the packaging that the dog shouldn't be allowed to play with this toy alone, and I can understand why. My two have been left with this ball every day since it arrived in our home and they haven't even managed to scratch it. You can fill the Activity Ball with any treats that are small enough to fit through the holes. I've found that most brands of complete dog food work just fine, but I'm sure that if she could talk Skittle would recommend canine choc drops (never feed your dog chocolate designed for humans, it contains ingredients that are harmful to dogs, even in quite small quantities!) I wouldn't recommend this toy for use outside of the home due to the very nature of the toy, as it's for use with the dog's food, it really should be kept as clean as possible. If, however, your Activity Ball gets dirty it can be easily washed in the sink, although cleaning the inside is a li
          ttle tricky, as the ball does not come apart. I recommend half filling it with water and just swishing it around, or a bottle cleaner with a bendy wire neck also works very well. I wouldn't even like to guess about whether it?s dishwasher safe or not! So, Skittle loves her Canac Activity ball, I can go to work happy in the knowledge that she'll be entertained while I'm gone, but you may be wandering what Mokee is doing all of the time that Skittle is barking around the house like a lunatic with her Activity Ball. Well, fear not, gentle reader, although Skittle would never allow Mo to play with 'her' activity ball, Mokee doesn't mind a bit, as she's able to trot around the house behind Skittle picking up all of the canine treats that Skittle has missed, as she's too busy prancing after the Activity Ball. See, everybody's happy! So, you see, the activity ball has been a great success in this household, and I would have no hesitation at all in recommending it to anybody in a similar situation, and neither, I suspect, would Skittle and Mo!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            10.06.2001 22:59
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            13 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            • "Use only dry food"

            It all began with the curtain hooks. Sorry, perhaps I should introduce myself. My name’s Rosie, and I’m a Rhodesian Ridgeback. My favourite snack used to be curtain hooks. I once ate 32 by chewing them out of a curtain whilst SHE was out shopping. I didn’t mind telephone cabling, if I couldn’t get the curtain hooks. For some reason they took exception to this, but I can’t think why, and they had a word with a dog trainer. “She needs to work harder for her food”, the trainer said. Well, I was offended. Do they not know how hard I had to work to pull those curtains down? When telephone cabling is stapled into the top of the skirting board it takes same getting out, I can tell you. “You need to make her mind work harder”. Obviously there was no understanding of the planning that had to go into doing all this work, and then being fast asleep in the dog bed and looking innocent when they came in. “What she needs”, they were told “is a treat ball”. Well, only a human could make more work for themselves, so that they could make more work for me, when the simplest thing would have been to buy curtain hooks and leave me a packet when they went out. No, they had to go out and get a treat ball. Now it isn’t like a proper ball that you can get your teeth into and puncture. This one is very hard plastic, and it’s definitely too big to get into my mouth, so it is very big. There are two holes in it, at opposite sides, and there’s some sort of wiggly channel in between. Your human puts treats into one of the holes, and closes the twist stopper and then you have to roll the ball around the floor to get the treats out at the other side. To start with it was quite good fun, but you can only have fairly small, dry treats otherwise they get stuck in the mechanism, and frankly I got tired of it after a while, once I discovered that I could achieve the desi
            red result by standing still, putting my paw on top of the ball and rocking it too and fro. It started me thinking . You see, to make certain that you’re not going to get fat (humans are obsessed with that aren’t they?) they have to reduce the amount of food that they give you at meal times by the same amount as they put into the treat ball, and there’s no point in giving the ball after a meal because no dog’s that keen to work after a meal are they? So what they do is give it to you before the meal, and let you chase it around for 15 minutes before they give you the rest of the food. It didn’t strike me that I was getting a very good deal out of this. Now, what you need to do if they give you one of these treat balls is this. Firstly you need to make use of the nuisance factor. Pick an evening when they’re both looking a bit frazzled, and when they put the ball down, knock it round the skirting boards. When you’re out of sight you can even give it a good kick against a door. It makes a wonderful noise. With luck the people from next door will be round to see if there’s a problem. They’ll soon get tired of the racket, and they’ll put you and the ball into a room where you can’t readily get at the skirting board. This is fine. Wait until they’re out of sight, and kick it behind a chair. Go to them and whinge that you can’t get your treat ball. Humans are not particularly intelligent. You can do this quite a few times before they realise that you know what you’re doing and it’s much more fun than pushing a ball around the floor for food that you were going to get in any case. The final trick is a little bit naughty, and I’ll leave it up to you as to whether you think you ought to do it. Wait until she’s getting the evening meal ready, and he’s sat down with a drink watching the news. Settle down somewhere quietly, and hold the
            ball with your feet. Use your teeth to turn the plastic stopper ANTI-CLOCKWISE and then eat the treats as they come out. Finally go into the kitchen with the stopper in your mouth, and start crunching it. She will have some choice words to say to him, (I’m sorry, I can’t repeat them on a family site) and he will start chasing you round trying to get the stopper out of your mouth. This is much more fun than just playing with the treat ball and much better mental and physical exercise for you and for him. The snag is that you can only do this once unless they really are stupid. The next day you’ll be back to getting all your food in your bowl. Do I still eat curtain hooks? Well, no. When you’re young you do eat some junk food don’t you? It’s only as you get older that you realise that you need to eat a healthy diet, and to watch your weight.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
              More Comments
          • Product Details

            Hardwearing interactive treat training ball / plastic ball that can be filled with treats

          Products you might be interested in