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Mikki Guillotine Nail Clipper for Cats and Dogs

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10 Reviews

Manufacturer: Mikki / Type: Dog / Cat Grooming

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    10 Reviews
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      12.07.2012 22:46
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      Fixed our problem!

      As many of you may know from reading my reviews me and my best mate share a dog. She went out and bought Daisy the beautiful rescue poodle but Daisy splits her time at night between us and most days she's in the company of both of us.

      As a result of this I get poo picking up duties and bathing and so on if she's here and the other week me and my mate noticed that she had a problem with her claws. They were very long and slightly rough at the ends and we think she'd been chewing them as her due claw was hanging and beeding. First off I wrapped it in bandage for a couple of days and bathed it but the claw definetely was far too long and digging into her pad so something had to be done with it.

      So off me and my mate went to Wilkinsons and we stumbled upon these clippers we had never heard of before priced around the five pound mark. There were a few different sized clippers and these ones are for long claws for dogs and cats.

      The Packaging:

      These come on hanging red cardboard with a photograph of a dog and a cat on it and see through plastic over the clippers. We are told on that, that they are 'M' Mikki Guillotine Nail Clipper 'For Regular Use' and that as I have previously mentioned that they are for long claws. On the back of that cardboard we are told a little bit about the product and given guidance on how to use them (and this information is also given in foreign languages) and contact details for Mikki Pet Products are given.

      The Clippers:

      Well these clippers are not too big and I have small hands and they are a great size for me to use and quite comfortable. They are mainly black plastic and the underside of them is raised and ridged red rubber to give you a bit of grip. Basically the clippers are an all in one with an upside and underside and you squeeze them together after putting the pooches nail is the silver blade first which is at the end of the clippers and there is a coil that as you squeeze meets meaning that the blade raises and is meant to cut the nail.

      Of course with any cat or dad you need to be very careful and confident. You have to avoid the 'quick' as this contains blood vessels and with darker nails you can usually locate the quick by it getting darker on the underside of the nail and you need to avoid that like the plague, on clear nails you can cut more confidently as no blood vessels are there apart from in the paws of course.

      However. On the ends of Daisys nails I found them to easily chip off the nail but the thicker the nail got the harder it got to cut them and it took some real squeezing from me and I was rather concerned for Daisy and her comfort. It took time and effort and I'm pretty sure she didn't enjoy the experience one bit at all. You can easily remove the blade and replace them (though I haven't seen any blades I can buy for this) but all in all although I did manage to trim her nails with no mistakes made on my part I was concerned and did find it hard work and felt that I needed a sharper blade so I could faff about less and save her distress.

      As I say though these did the job for us but if I could go back in time I wouldn't buy them again and pay more for something better!

      Google if interested!

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      14.06.2012 18:43

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      Nice design but useless tool

      I purchased these for around £5.00 from my local pet store thinking that this seemed a bargain compared to the usual £25-£30 that you would pay at a doggy groomers, however, they was £5.00 for a reason, the packaging was very simple but eye catching and looked quite professional, the design of the clippers is very sturdy and strong and also makes you feel like you are using pliers rather than nail clippers, however, the one thing that should be the best part is the worst, the actual blades used to cut the nails I find are painfully blunt they tend to bend your dogs nails back as the blades close in together and leave you hacking at your dogs nails rather than cutting them, they are quite hard to use you have to apply alot of strengh to squeeze them closed over the nails get and then they dont work.
      These looked great and I thought they would be ideal for my EBT and OTBulldog as they have quite strong nails, however after wrestling with my dogs for quite sometime, I managed to attempt clipping their nails, I failed horribly, not due to me but due to the product, the design looks like a good idea but I had to try three times before it even cut a little bit of the nail but after looking closer I saw that they split my dogs nail rather than cut them leaving my dog in dis-comfort.
      I have to admit I do use these on my Yorkie and they have been brilliant for him, they work wonderfully he has thin nails so they cut them very easily and I manage to cut them quickly to avoid dis-stress for him, I thought he would try to escape whilst cutting his nails as he normally would but he doesnt seem to mind them at all, however my main reason for buying these were my other two dogs as Toby wear his nails down quite well himself and generally only needs his cut once in awhile.
      These nail clippers really should be aimed at certain nail types they are great for small dogs with thin nails but really very bad for medium to large dogs with hard naills.

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      14.01.2012 21:42

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      I think these are great, it makes cutting my animals (cats & dogs) nails so much easier and much cheaper than having to take them to a groomer! It's completely safe for your pets and very quick.

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      06.10.2010 15:17
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      This is a useful tool, but only if you know how to use it, and for small to med. dogs.

      Some years ago, I had a pair of staffies, male and female, but the female had suffered a broken toe shortly after birth. Because of the way the toe healed one nail did not make contact with the ground. This meant that I needed to trim this nail regularly. As I worked in a pet shop at the time, I picked up a set of these clippers, as this was the brand my shop carried. I have also groomed dogs in the past and used far better clippers, but unfortunately I can not remember the brand name. However professional clippers, for a grooming studio will be far more expensive as well.

      I found these clippers perfectly adequate for my purposes. However I was only cutting one nail each time instead of 16-18 so I imagine this could be why the clippers lasted me longer. They were bought when my dog was a pup and given away with her when she was four and the two staffies decided that my home was not big enough for both of them. After almost losing the two dogs to a horrible fight, the vet suggested another client who was looking for a staffy and we decided re homing one was the only option.

      I found the best way to use these clippers was one quick very forceful snip. They did require strong hands, and if I had the dog now I would be unable to do this. The clipper has a small hole you slip over the nail and when you squeeze the handles together it works like a guillotine and snaps off the nail. this is meant to be easier than the scissor types, but I found it more awkward, perhaps just because I was used to another type, but I found it harder to judge the exact spot of the nail with these. I was fortunate in that it was a white nail that needed clipping which makes it easy to see the quick. The clippers need to be kept perfectly clean and dry as any dirt will dull the blade, not to mention be a source of potential infection if you should clip to far. I wiped mine down with alcohol after use.

      While I found these adequate, and at the price I had no complaints, I was using these for a medium sized dog and a white nail ( which are generally easier to cut). I think this product would be totally useless for large dogs such as the Weimaraner shown, in fact I think it might be dangerous at you would end up more or less chewing through the nail with these. Had they been marketed only to small or medium dogs I would have given this five stars, as it is I am only giving it three.

      **********************************************************
      Some general tips on nail clipping:

      I would prefer to wear the dogs the nails down through exercise, however sometimes this is not possible, especially with elderly dogs. If the dogs nails do not wear down properly, they must be clipped or the toes will become splayed out damaging the foot. If you are unsure how to do this, please, see a vet or groomer. Most will show you how to properly clip the nails for a small price. I do know of one case where a dog died from subsequent infection, and also suffered a great deal of pain when a well meaning owner cut the nail far to short.

      If the dogs nails are badly over grown, do not attempt to fix this all at once. Instead tip the nail ( taking just a tiny bit off) wait a week and do it again, gradually the quick will recede, and you can reach a more acceptable length. If in doubt, better to leave the nail a bit too long than to cut too deeply. That said a small amount of bleeding is common, still I wouldn't like my nails cut to the point of bleeding and I am certain dogs do not like either.

      If your dog really hates having its nails cut, make a daily routine of it, using the clipper next to the nail to make the noise and offering treats without actually clipping most days. Then if needed clip only a couple of nails at a time and wait for the dog to settle before clipping more.

      Finally if nail clipping remains a nightmare, many people manage to keep the dogs nails in order with emory boards like people use to smooth nails. It may be worth a try.

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        02.10.2010 15:11
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        Easy to use but understand what you are doing

        It used to immensely frustrate me having to take my animals to the V-E-T-S (we don't mention the word 'vets' in our house because it can frighten the animals!!) each time they needed their nails clipping. Two big dogs and a smaller Cocker Spaniel, booking an appointment, traipsing them all down in the car, clip, clip, clip, that will be £30 please.

        So eventually I thought enough and went out and bought a pair of these clippers from Amazon for just under £5. I did a lot of research about nail clippers in general and there seems to be 2 different sorts. You get the basic set which is like a pair of pliers where you squeeze the handles together and that brings 2 blades together to cut the nail. The other is a guillotine affair, like these Mikki ones, where you slot the nail into a large hole and squeeze the handles together which brings a blade up to close the hole and cut the nail (rather like the guillotines of years gone by that the French used to be-head people). Of the 2, this guillotine method seemed to get the better reviews, although to be honest there didn't appear to be much in it.

        So what do you get with these Mikki clippers? Well, they are pretty well made and have lasted me a few years now. The metal is black and the handles are apparently 'ergonomically designed' for comfort, which I suppose is true because they are slightly padded and nicely rounded to fit into your hand making them comfortable and easy to use.

        OK, now the tricky bit is actually cutting my dog's nails with them. So the idea is, read the instructions, select the nail, slot it through the hole, line up, squeeze the handles and cut. Easy!! When I take my animals to the V-E-T-S to have their nails clipped and they will just sit there nicely and even put their paws up like their having their nails done in some doggy salon. So this should be a breeze for me to do at home - so I thought!!

        But why is it that when I dare to even open the drawer that has these nail clippers in, they all run off in different directions never to be found. Every time they need to have their nails clipped at home we have to go on some sort of pre-planned combat mission routine, pre-locating the clippers in some room near their beds and then wait until they fall asleep, whereupon we creep up on them and slowly start to clip. OK, the Cocker is quite good now, probably because he is 13 and can't be bothered to move, and the larger female just sort of gives up the chase once we have her cornered and lies there to have them done.

        But with my other big Deerhound, it's a different story again. Whilst he's brilliant at the V-E-T-S, we normally manage to get maybe one, possibly 2 nails clipped as he slowly wakes up in a doggy haze to the realisation of what we are doing, whereupon, he suddenly realises in a panic, lets out a yelp and scarpers (it's a bit difficult to try and hold down a dog the size of a small horse!!). So cutting his nails becomes a long term plan of doing one or 2 when ever we can and have to keep track of which ones we've done.

        OK, I seem to have dogs at both ends of the scale in terms of how they feel about having their nails cut, but these clippers seem to make the job easy to do and they have remained sharp through the years, which is another important feature to have and maintain when you cut animal's nails.

        The only real advice I can give to anyone wanting to cut animal's nails at home is to learn about the nail because it is all to easy to try and cut off too much of the nail in one go, thereby cutting into what is known as the quick of the nail (rather like the pink bit of your own nail) which grows part way through the middle, and causing the animal quite some pain. If you do this once, it may well put the dog off having its nails cut next time. Luckily I haven't done it yet, but I know people who have accidently done this and it isn't nice for the animal.

        When we do their nails, we try and take off little bits each time, check where we are, and then cut a bit more off. If your animal has clear or whitish nails it is fairly easy to see where the quick is in the middle of the nail. But if they have dark nails it becomes more difficult, and it may sometimes help to look at the nail from underneath to see where the actual nail is and begins and ends.

        But overall, these can save you a considerable amount of money over what you will pay at the V-E-T-S to have them done. You just need to get your animals used to you doing them instead of the V-E-T.

        Highly recommended.

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          01.10.2010 15:40
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          We weren't impressed.

          Our doggy Tara has thick coarse nails that curl at her claw and although we take her on regular walks they seem to grow very quickly. When her nails get to a certain length they start to make a noise on our wooden floors - and this goes right through me. My boyfriend used to have a set of clippers for Tara, but he couldn't find them. He kept saying "Claire, be patient, I'll find them eventually." But one day, in desperation (because the sound was grating on me), I went to the pet store to purchase a new pair of clippers.

          I bought a pair Guillotine nail clippers from our local pet store for around £5.00, but they seem to be quite widely available and you can pick them up on Amazon for £4.20.

          When I got home my boyfriend said he'd clip Tara's nails (hallelujah), but he asked me to hold her because she doesn't particularly like the process and it's important that the dog is still when their claws are being clipped because otherwise the clippers might slip and damage the paw.

          My boyfriend placed Tara's nail in the clippers and pressed the two handles together, it seemed to take a lot of force to cut through the nail and when it did cut Tara's nails went flying across the living room!

          After using the clippers my boyfriend complained that they were pretty difficult to use. He has been cutting Tara's nails for 12 years - so I think it's fair to say he's experienced at doing this and from an observer's point of view cutting through the nail did seem tough, so there's no way I would recommend this product to a novice (like myself) because I would not feel comfortable using them.

          The Guillotine nail clippers are advertised for dogs and cats, but I can't imagine getting a cat to sit still long enough to have their nails clipped with a pair of these. Also, I would not recommend these clippers to anybody that has a large dog because cutting through our staffie's nails is difficult enough - so if your dog's big then I think this product would be a complete waste of time.

          I can only give Guillotine nail clippers two stars, because for me, the negatives outweighed the positives. If you have a small dog and you're experienced in clipping their nails then maybe you should consider this product, otherwise - steer clear.

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            27.09.2010 10:56
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            Good for me but probably not for most owners

            Although I take my dog Molly walks every day this doesn't keep her nails short enough and they still need to be trimmed on a regular basis.
            I decided instead of continuing to fork out money to the vet to do it for me that I was more than capable of managing on my own so I set about buying a pair of nail clippers.
            My method for choosing them wasn't very scientific as I just bought the first pair that I saw in pets at home.

            They are called the Guillotine nail clippers and are made by a company called Mikki. I have no idea if they are exclusive to pets at home but I haven't seen them for sale anywhere else so if you are looking for them then it is probably best to go straight there for them.
            The price of the clippers was just under £5 which was good as it meant that they were costing me less than it would to get Molly's nails clipped once with the vet.
            The clippers are made of two plastic handles with the 'guillotine' at the top of them. To use them you just have to place the nail inside the hole and squeeze and the guillotine part will chop it off.

            It sounds incredibly easy and to begin with I was extremely confident but when I went to use them for the first time I chickened out. I have heard horror stories about people clipping their dogs nails at home and cutting through the blood supply so I did a google search so better familiarise myself with the correct way to do it.
            That done I plucked up the courage to use them for the first time.

            Sitting Molly on my knee I placed her nail in the hole and squeezed the handles together. The squeezing takes a surprising amount of force to be able to cut right through the nail and the first few times it took me a couple of tries to actually make it all the way through it.
            I absolutely hated using this style of clipper in the beginning as it made me even more nervous having to put her nails in a hole and not being able to see exactly where I was cutting them. If I had put more thought into it I would definitely have got scissor clippers instead as I just think that they would be better for inexperienced people and allowed me more control in what I was doing.

            Molly absolutely hates getting her nails done and although she will sit for it she spends the whole time shaking. I think that if your dog will fidget or pull away then these would also not be right for you as you need to be able to make sure once you have the nail in the hole that it doesn't move just as you are squeezing the handles together so that you do not accidently cut too much off.

            With use and practise I have grown to quite like this style of clipper and I now make sure that I do her nails on a regular basis. Because I am so paranoid about cutting the quick and causing her pain and to bleed I literally cut the tiniest amount off the top of them every time rather than wait until they have grown long.

            These clippers are recommended for use on both dogs and cats but I wouldn't envy anyone the job of trying to manoeuvre a cat who doesn't want to sit still to position its nails in the hole.
            Also although on the packaging that they came with there is a picture of a large dog I wouldn't really think that these would be suitable. My sister has big dogs and I know how long and thick their claws are and I have enough trouble squeezing them through Molly's nails and she is only tiny and her nails aren't even all that thick.

            Buying these clippers has definitely saved me time and money in vet's bills and I do think they are quite a good product but they are certainly not a great one as there are too many limitations with using them.
            I would only recommend them to people who have small dogs and have either the experience or confidence to use them otherwise I think that another type of clipper would be best suited.

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              07.07.2010 22:20
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              Recommended.

              My chihuahua's nails are so long that he would probably make most women very jealous! Like many small breeds of dog, because he's so light, his claws don't get worn down in the normal way through walking on hard surfaces. So, every few months or so, much to his disgust, I have to clip his nails for him - which I do using the Mikki Guillotine Nail Clippers. In the past I have taken my dogs to the vets to have their nails clipped, but as my present dog has clear nails, I'm able to see the nerves underneath and so can safely clip them without any risk of causing him any pain or damage.

              I bought these clippers for £5.29 from Pets at Home - which was the mid-range price for the clippers that were on display.

              These clippers are relatively small - the dimensions being 21 cm x 13 cm x 1 cm and, when purchased, they were in a plastic packaging which was easy to remove.

              Using the clippers are easy - particularly if your dog is the size of a large hamster as my dog is!! Its often easier to do it with two people so one of you can hold the dog and the other can clip......but if you're doing it alone, then its easier if you wrap the dog in a towel so that he can't thrash around too much. In order to clip the nails, you simply rest the claw you're going to cut on the part of the blade that has the little cut out part removed - and you then squeeze the clippers together in the same was as you would scissors. I find the clippers to be very sharp and they cut the nail cleanly each time without any jamming whatsoever. The clippers also seem to be very precise and so this gives me more confidence when I'm using them.

              The handles of the clippers are shaped like pliers and have a soft grip on the underside of them. I find that they are perfectly comfortable for me to use. I do generally prefer clippers whose handles are shaped like scissors as this design usually makes me feel as if I have more control when I'm actually cutting the nails. However, the plier design does work well also.

              The only non-pleasant thing about using these clippers is that as I cut the nails, the removed part tends to shoot off across the room! For this reason, I tend to clip his nails outside whenever possible because then I don't have to spend time hunting for nail clippings around my lounge!

              Although my dog clearly doesn't like having his nails clipped, using these clippers the whole experience is quick and painless for him - and so his distress level is kept to a minimum.

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                04.04.2010 10:15
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                Not suitable for big dogs with thick claws

                Once upon a time several very long walks a day were all that were needed to keep my dogs claws at a sensible length but as she's become older those walks have become shorter and like elderly mens eyebrows they've started to sprout out of control. The simplest way of dealing with this is to trim them regularly. My options are rather limited either I pay my vet £20 rather too frequently or I trim them myself. Fortunately she has clear claws which means I can see precisely where the blood supply to the nail is. With a dark clawed dog this is nigh on impossible to see. Cut the nails too short, you also clip the blood supply, distress the dog and get an awful lot of blood everywhere. It can take over ten minutes for the claw to stop bleeding, longer if the dog is very distressed and insists on pacing up and down.

                I've had plenty of practise trimming claws over the past few years, so much so in fact that the rivet holding my clippers together worked loose and the clippers had to be replaced. Pets at Home didn't have any similar clippers in stock so instead I succumbed to the temptations of the Mikki Guillotine clippers, after the rather substantial "Deluxe Nail Clippers" that these were replacing I was more than a little sceptical that something suitable for cats, dogs and small animals would be strong enough to go through the very thick nails on my rather large Samoyed but since the picture on the packet included a Weimaraner and the hole within the jaws of the guillotine was large enough for the claw to fit through I decided to give them a try anyway.

                The clippers are simple enough to use. Simply poke the dog (or cat or rabbit) claw through the hole and squeeze. Orf with the claw. In reality life's never that simple. First placate 30kg of dog, place claw through hole in clipper and catch clipper as dog shakes foot and clippers fly across room. Bribe dog with chew bar and repeat. Assuming your dogs claws grow straight you simply insert the claw and squeeze and the trimming is spat across the room. If on the other hand the nail is twisted (as is common with elderly dogs) then you have to nibble away at the claw a little at a time because very few dogs are patient enough to allow you to feed the clippers over their claw in much the same way you do the fairground game with the metal hoop, wiggly wire and beeper.

                All went swimmingly well for the first few clips but a surprising amount of force was required to get the guillotine to go through the claw and on more than one occasion it jammed mid way through the cut, distressing the dog who is usually very patient and is used to having her claws clipped regularly. I hadn't quite finished the claws on her font paws when the guillotine mechanism stopped working. Fortunately Pets at Home exchanged it without question for a pair of the more substantial Deluxe Nail Clipppers.

                I can only conclude that these are not suited to large dogs with thick claws, but they are much easier to use than the scissor version.

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                18.02.2010 14:49
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                A great item if you have the courage and patience to use it.

                I bought a dog and while I had done my research I wasn't entirely sure about dogs needing their toe nails clipped, but they do. My other half and I went to Pets At Home to have a look at nail clippers. The breeder had showed us the guillotine style clippers and told us these were easier.

                In Pets At Home we found a guillotine styles nail clipper by Mikki, suitable for both dogs and cats. The clipper cost £4.49 and I thought this was reasonable considering how long a product like this should last. But we'll see if it stands the test of time, and my dog.

                The guillotine nail clipper comes in a plastic and cardboard packet, which shows the product and has the directions and instructions on.

                The packet is fairly flimsy and most of the clipper packets were broken but the product inside was fine. Instead of the packet being clued is was merely stapled together, which I understand in this day and age with costs etc but it does look cheap and like I said, all the packets were broken. It isn't the type of thing you could buy for someone.

                The product itself is very sturdy and is literally 2 handles, it almost looks like a nut cracker but instead of the nut cracker at the end it has a small loop with a guillotine slice blade attached.

                You would be able to fit your fingers in the hole but perhaps a small child could, so I would suggest keeping this item away from all children.

                The opening / hole where the nail is placed to be guillotined off is a reasonable size for a dog claw and is not too tiny you'd struggle to place the nail in.

                I must hold my hands up and admit I do not even attempt to cut my dogs nails, I don't like the thought of it, and knowing me I'd get the quick and hurt him.

                My other half is in charge of the nail trimming and he tends to do it when the dog is asleep or chilling out, although if he is just chilling, he sticks his nose in the way.

                You can place the nail as far in as you want then proceed to push the two handles together until the guillotine slides up and cuts the nail. We do a tiny bit at a time, and were told if you don't cut the nails the quick gets bigger within the nail.

                Luckily we've had not quick snipping (touch wood) and hopefully won't, we do this a few times a week and literally take off a tiny bit. The dog is fine with it, although a nosey little mite.

                The blade is quite sharp and I wouldn't recommend running your finger over it, but all in all, unless you can fit your fingers inside the hole, it is relatively safe.

                The guillotine clipper leaves nails trimmed although possibly sharp which can be seriously annoying, but I would recommend this over paying at the vets for your dogs nails to be cut. I think this purely just for the price aspect although if you are less confident or your dog won't sit still, maybe the vets are the better choice. If you handle your dog all over from a puppy then he/she should get used to it. Since we've had our dog, we have constantly been all over him and he lets us do what we want to him.

                The blade is black which can be a tad annoying if your dog has black nails but it is quite easy to see the difference between the nails and the guillotine.

                This product is very easy to use and I would recommend it for trimming nails.

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