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Pedigree Chum

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12 Reviews

Brand: Pedigree / Food Type: Dog Food

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      12.03.2014 13:05
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      A matter of personal choice

      Pedigree Chum:

      There are a lot of rumours about Pedigree Pet Foods Products and I know when I was growing up it was considered "rubbish" and was certainly a food my mother would never have considered feeding. However the bigwigs at Pedigree decided to "up" their game and an improved product together with an extensive advertising and sponsorship campaign brought them to the fore of domestic dog and cat food.

      Under review here is Pedigree Chum Original the tinned foodstuff that caused all the rumours and controversy all those years ago. With any tinned dog food the consumer needs to bare in mind that a large part of the contents is water and it is essential to both ensure adequate quantities are fed and that a mixer is included in the diet. Tinned dog food with very few exceptions is not designed to be fed as a complete diet.

      Following extensive sponsorship of dog shows and agility classes Pedigree has become a well-known feed among owners who partake in those sports. Due to being available on almost every supermarket pet food shelf this product is also popular amongst consumers. Recently Pedigree have a TV campaign due to their support and sponsorship of the Dogs Trust Charity.


      As we know the pitfalls of any processed foods are many and that the term "animal derivatives" means that the product contains literally any kind of animal product. Obviously these tend to be parts such as offal, ground bone or pigs ears that are the cheapest. In common with most animal feeds the dog food contains the parts that are not used for the human production line. However, Pedigree Chum is known to contain rather a lot of Kangaroo Meat. That it is worth transporting Kangaroo meat from Australia is a travesty in itself, but the use of Kangaroo parse is not an issue for me, as it is better to feed it to animals than just burn the unwanted carcasses. Likewise the tinned product contains rather a lot of cereal product these days and this to, tends to be by-product or not quite good enough cereal from/for the human food chain. Likewise the oil content in animal feeds tends to be that that has been skimmed off from the better quality "human" grade product.

      Pedigree do try hard to ensure that their feedstuff is adequate for the needs of our best friends and they add minerals and vitamins as well.

      Ingredients & What Pedigree Say:

      "Original: Meat and Animal Derivatives (42%, including 4% Beef), Cereals, Fish and Fish Derivatives, Minerals, Derivatives of Vegetable Origin (0.5% Died Sugar Beet Pulp), Oils and Fats (0.5% Sunflower Oil).

      Our Nutrition contains:

      Calcium to support healthy bones
      Natural fibres to help keep his insides healthy so he always feels at his best Zinc & sunflower oil containing omega 6, known to support healthy skin & a shiny coat Vitamin E to help support his immune system, so he's ready for anything

      Daily feeding instructions:
      Body Weight (kg): 5, Number of cans/day: 1
      Body Weight (kg): 10, Number of cans/day: 1 3/4
      Body Weight (kg): 20, Number of cans/day: 3
      Body Weight (kg): 30, Number of cans/day: 4"

      From http://uk. pedigree.com/food-and-treats/ wet-can/can-loaf


      My Own Experience:

      My own experience of Pedigree Chum has been quite favourable, we had a Cinnamon Trust dog staying with us for 9 months and the strict instructions were that he had to have Pedigree Chum to eat. Naturally these days the bad old reputation has gone, but in many dog minded people the memory is long and it is not otherwise something I would have tried. However, the little guy did well on his Pedigree Chum and Coop Mixer and I found that my own dogs quite liked it too. He never had a bad tummy, his coat and eyes were shiny and his energy levels where correct. I used to feed my dogs mostly complete dry kibble and bowing down to my husband's idea that it was not fair to just feed them dry kibble some soft or tinned meat as well. One of the tins I sometimes use is Pedigree Chum which I buy occasionally when it is on offer. Again, I never have a problem with tummy upsets or anything else when I feed it, but I do only give about one eighth of a tin per dog per day. They love the smell when I open the tin and the tins are provided with a useful pull can to make them easier to use.

      Packaging:

      The Pedigree chum tins are available in 400g and 800g sizes and are spotted by the distinctive yellow paper outer and the red Pedigree logo.

      Price and Availability:

      A 400g tin is 55p from Asda with a 6 pack being £3.00 as mentioned these are widely available from supermarkets.

      Conclusion:

      Following extensive sponsorship of dog shows and agility classes Pedigree has become a well-known feed among owners who partake in those sports. Due to being available on almost every supermarket pet food shelf this product is also popular amongst consumers. Recently Pedigree has a TV campaign due to their support and sponsorship of the Dogs Trust Charity.

      Today I don't think Pedigree Chum is any better or any worse than any other animal food, certainly Chappie has the inside advantage of being the brand that vets recommend, but of all the others, apart from the very cheap varieties seem to be much of a muchness really. I have used this for several dogs large and small and they all like it, so that is a positive testament in itself. Personally, feeding dogs is a bit of a minefield and each family has to work out what is best for them.

      I would recommend this food for the way we feed it which is as an occasional treat - see it as the human equivalent of something like a Pizza. Yes, it's quite good for you, but there are better meals out there!

      Stars an average 3/5

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        07.03.2014 22:40
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        Not ideal as a complete diet, but can be part of a healthy diet.

        I have heard some real horror stories about pedigree dog food, and I know a lot of people hate it. I could tell my own horror story as I was once given a dog very near death in large part from a pedigree chum only diet. The poor dumb owner had not realised how much of this food was water, so the dog was literally starving to death on one tin a day ( and I suspect some days this was forgotten altogether). He was kept outdoors with no shelter so needed more calories to fight the cold as well. I didn't keep the dog. He hated women and never took to me but within a few of a weeks of a proper diet he was well on the road to recovery, within 2 months he was rehomed fit as a fiddle. I honestly don't know how many of the horror stories you read online are true, but I do not believe this is balanced or healthy diet - so why would feed it to my dog? In short, I think most things are OK in moderation. My dog does really enjoy this, and it is easy to keep a tin in the cupboard for the occasional time when I don't have any real meat to add to her dinner. My dog is always given dry mixer, with various table scraps including a small portion of any meat cooked in the house that day, or perhaps a good serving of cheese. At times I have meat bought specifically for the dog - often liver, kidney, heart or chicken leg quarters which can be bought already cooked at 8 for £2 at a local butcher and have enough meat to do two days in pinch.

        Tora gets on average two tins a month of this. She might get a bit more when we go to the caravan, or when we have had a lot of hospital visits, but then she might go two months or more in the winter without a single tin. If this fed only occasionally, she does seem to really enjoy it. I would usually only feed her a half tin per day, as she is not a huge eater, and she always has some people food, plus dry food, so when she does get this, it is usually two days in a row. Anything over three days and she seems to take offense, lifting the chum out of the dish and depositing it on the kitchen floor to show her disgust, but she isn't big on many foods too many days in a row. My first dog of my own, which I got at age 14, had a half a tin of this every day and was happy enough with it, but he didn't have as much to choose from. I worked odd jobs and spent most of my pocket money to see to it that he always had some meat with his dinner, and thought I was doing a really good thing. he died of cancer at age though, so maybe I wasn't. Tora is an exceptionally fussy eater - and all of my other dogs have enjoyed the odd tin of this as well, so I do think it is something most dogs used to dry food would see as treat.

        I know many people will disagree with me - as this isn't a popular food among doggie fanciers, but I do feel this is fine as occasional treat, or the odd quick meal for a dog. I do not think any dog should have this as their primary source of nutrition. I'm not one for listing ingredients, but in this case I feel it is important so here goes. the ingredients given are for the chicken in jelly recipe, as this the one in my cupboard at the moment. All the jellied recipes are basically the same though with the only change being whatever flavour the food is meant to be will have a minimum of 4% that type of meat. So where does the other 96% of the food come from?


        Meat and animal derivatives 42 % - minimum chicken 4%

        Legally the term animal derivatives allows a manufacturer to use any type of meat, and it will usually be what the supplier can get cheapest - but it is not all meat - it can include any by product of the slaughtering house as well by law. To be honest - I don't know exactly what by products are used, and I doubt many other consumers do either, but it could be innards, hair, hoof, bone, heads hooves etc.. Pedigree claims that it only uses fresh meats, and uses this term to allow them to use "the freshest meats available". In reality I suspect it the cheapest meats available, but they point out - no animals are slaughtered for the production of pedigree. It is made from the left over parts humans don't want. Now that isn't to say it all bad. I often buy heart as most people don't want to eat it anymore and it can be sourced for very little money, but still makes a good occasional, if very rich pet food. Tripe is fine for dogs as well, but Tora doesn't like it. The problem is - we really don't know exactly what is in the tin - but that is probably true of the sausage and bargain burgers we buy for human consumption as well. On the plus side, many people may feel more comfortable feeding their pet a meat that did not directly cause the death of another animal. On the negative side - many of us do feel uncomfortable feeding the dog what is in effect, garbage.

        Cereals - derivatives of vegetable origin: Again, this is usually the waste products from human food production

        That is really all there listed under ingredients. There is a very minimal amount of sugar beet pulp (0.7 %) and of sunflower oil ( 0.5 %). I was really surprised that there were no preservatives listed - but then I noticed the additives section just across from the ingredients. T I immediatly suspected all teh long and awkward sounding chemical names of being awful perservatives, but they all turned out to be mineral supplements, like copper, zinc and iron. There is one other additive 1960 milligrams of cassia gum added as a gelling agent, but there still were not any preservatives. Now I've read a lot of nasty stuff about the preservatives in pedigree tinned food, and I know there used to be other chemicals at one time, but this tin doesn't list even one. I spent ages looking this up, and Pedigree no longer uses any preservatives in their tinned food. So everything on the web in this regard is either dated or hearsay. Of course it isn't nearly as bad as the old story that they were using dead cats and dogs - also complete rubbish.

        Look and smell - for some reason when I was pregnant - this smelled delicious. I never did yield to the temptation to try it, but it smelled quite nice and meaty. It was probably something to do with the fact that I was seriously anaemic, to the point of having IV iron supplements, but it smelled lovely. My father used to really enjoy sandwiches made of this many years ago ( my mother maintained that he would eat anything while drunk and always demanded everything in the house - she might as well save a few quid as he certainly drank the money up fast enough - he never knew what she fed him, but years later asked if my mother still got that lovely tinned sandwich meat and didn't understand our laughter. He wanted to know the brand so he could buy it himself. But whether the recipe is the same or not - I don't know - nor if it would have tasted nearly as nice sober. I do know it was sold under a different name then.

        Now without the influence of pregnancy, I don't find this appealing. But it isn't a horrible smell and it really doesn't smell much different from some of the sandwich pastes my husband eats. It is a bit jellied looking, and it doesn't look as nice as freshly cooked meat, but it isn't bad, and the smell is not overly powerful. I would note that if you feed to much of this though, the smell the dog produces later may be very powerful indeed. Too much tinned food does lead to gas.

        So overall, I don't think this food is nearly as terrible as it has been made it out. It does have a very high moisture content, so a dog would need a lot more tinned food than dry - and they will poop more too. I do have my reservations about the quality of animal derivatives, but this is on all the tins of dog food we have tried. I have also seen many dogs with every tooth in their mouth rotted away from a tinned food only diet, and no matter what anyone says, I will never believe this a complete and balanced food without any additional food. I feel a good quality dry food should form the main portion of a dogs diet, with additional table scraps and meat. But dogs do enjoy tinned food far more than dry, and I think a balance can easily be struck. Adding a small amount of tinned food gives the dog variety and a much more enjoyable meal than dry alone. I would never recommend that anyone feed a dog a diet of 50% or more tinned food, but if no one in the house ate meat, I'd be happy enough to feed this much more often, and as an occasional treat, I see nothing wrong with this.

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          04.08.2013 01:47
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          A dog food worth trying out.

          I'm reviewing our Pedigree Chum Dog Food.
          This present lot cost me around £6 for a 12 tin pack.
          ________________________________________

          ***WHY***

          When we first decided to adopt a dog we discussed food with friends and relatives who had canines to get an idea of the best food, food that was potentially bad, and what worked for them.
          Out of about 8 people we asked most use this brand and have healthy dogs and just the one gave it a thumbs down as disagreeing with his dog, so we had decided to choose a dog and then consult the people at the Rehoming Centre regarding what to feed her or him.
          We chose Kizzy/she chose us and between us we chose Pedigree Chum as her wet food.

          ***USING and MY OPINION***

          This comes in a 400g tin with a ring pull for easy opening.
          The multi-packs contain variations in flavours . Generally you get Chicken ,Lamb, and beef and our 12 pack was 6xChicken.....3x Lamb....3xBeef.
          It smells in varying degrees, depending on the content. I find the chicken one just a little bit less nasty regarding odour , but I just don't like the smell of dog food in general and prefer hubby doing that job where possible.
          It does look and smell meaty though, and has a fair gravy content too, but it DOES have grains in it and this is something that bothers many people.

          We asked to speak to the vet at the rescue centre regarding this 'grain content' issue as we didn't want to give Kizzy something bad for her, but he was unavailable so we spoke to the lady in charge and she assured us that Kizzy had been eating a canned food of similar content to Pedigree Chum mixed with kibbles and had no digestion issues whatsoever. She explained that the grain content in some canned food gets "dealt with" further down in a dogs digestive tracts than a human's, and that this is why some dogs can't digest canned food containing grain/cereal things to bulk it out. Their upper digestive system can't handle it and they chuck it up.
          Not sure how accurate this is considering the lady was not a vet, but the fact that Kizzy was thriving on their similar brand after major surgery to remove her dead puppies was good enough for us. Lecture over.

          We give Kizzy one can per day divided between morning and evening meals and add a handful of dry food to it. She is a small dog and this suits her fine. I hate seeing fat unhealthy dogs overfed and unable to have the fun with other dogs in the dog park .
          Along with a tiny bedtime dry food snack around 10pm (I dislike the thought of her going to bed hungry) this routine works well for us and apart from a small issue of us overdoing the treats and causing a weight gain just over a year ago Kizzy has had a clean bill of health on each check up.
          Her coat is unbelievably shiny. So much so that it's hard to get pictures of her indoors because the lights bounce off her shaggy shiny coat, and her teeth and little navy-blue button eyes are perfectly healthy.
          Her poo is just poo. Never runny, and she has never been constipated to any noticable degree, so the Pedigree Chum is keeping her internal bits and bobs working just fine too.


          Would I recommend this ? Yes. But you must take advice from whomever you got your dog from. They will know what works for it. If you get a puppy then try this and monitor the puppy carefully. If it doesn't suit the pup's digestive system then they will throw it back up pretty darn quick and you might need to use a wet food not bulked out with grains.
          But for us, yes, it works well ...............so in fairness I must give it 5 stars.

          Thank you for reading~~~myloh

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            15.07.2012 00:23
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            Rich tinned food

            I have a boxer mix dog who is 8 years old. We give her dried food as recommended by the vet but as she has gotten older she seems to enjoy them less and less and often leaves half of it in her bowl. We decided to add half a can of tinned food as suggested by a friend to see if that encouraged her to finish her dinner. We bought Pedigree Chum as it is a reputable brand and only wanted the best for out pooch. The side of the tin says it has all your pet needs to stay healthy and fit. Perfect.

            I bought a mixed pack of 6, lamb, beef and chicken with vegetables 400g tins which was 3.00 pounds. Very reasonably priced I thought, from Asda.

            Ruby scoffed her dinner, she loved the half a can mixed in. The tinned food looks nice, dark and rich, thick gravy and a meaty smell. I placed the other half in the fridge, which kept perfectly for the next day although chilled the gravy went a little solid.

            The problem began on day 2. Her 'toilet' was very runny. I thought I would continue feeding her the Chum because she really loved it and I believed the change in her diet would settle down. But each day she got worse, she farted all day and when she needed to 'go' she didn't have much time. After 6 days and a few 'accidents' indoors , I had to stop giving it to my dog. She was appalled at this and didn't eat her dry biscuits for a while.

            I feel this food is just too rich for some doggy tummies. Maybe buy a small amount at first and build it up, just to see how your pet reacts.

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              29.04.2012 15:53
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              A good product for other dogs but not mine it seems! However the price is good and the size isn't ba

              Pedigree Chum

              So a few months ago we needed to get dog food for Lola desperately but couldn't find any shops open (as it was Sunday at about 5 o'clock. Luckily though I noticed one of the corner shops open and dived in. The only dog food they had available was, you've guessed it, pedigree chum! I grabbed a original flavour one and paid about £1 (I think!) and headed home to feed my dog. Here are the results:

              Size

              I have to say I was pretty surprised at the size for just £1 as it was not extremely thick but pretty tall. It didn't have a lot of space when you opened the lid either which pleased me as some food I have brought does! As it is wet food there was a bit of liquid but not too much and about 90% of the can was real food, another good point!

              The Can Itself

              As with most Pedigree products the label was the signature bright yellow with the little red ribbon (? can't remember what the little red thing on it was, its like what your kids win at a sports day?) and a picture of a cute black dog, who I must say looked very like my little lab-collie cross! The can is pretty pleasing to the eye and can straight away be recognized as dog food so I was happy!

              My Dog's Reaction

              Once I had got home and been greeted very excitedly, I opened the can and although I didn't agree, she sniffed at it and liked the smell! I scraped it out into her dog bowl and she set about chewing it up and eating it. At the time she seemed to enjoy it and that was good enough for me I guess. Although, like I say it did stink a bit! There was a generous amount to feed her completely and she looked very content after finishing it!

              A Few Hours Later!

              However, at about 8 o'clock she got up and stood in the middle of the front room. Me, my other half and my daughter didn't really take much notice of it to be honest as she does things like that sometimes! Fast forward ten minutes and I was kneeling on the laminate trying to wipe up some very runny sick and she was in the garden puking again! At the time we weren't sure if this was the food or not so decided to just stick her back on the normal food we give her.

              About a month later though we were in the same position but at my friends house. We ended up having to get some more pedigree chum because we had no other options. A few hours later she puked up again so we haven't brought it again!

              You might be wondering why I have still given this 2 stars bearing in mind it made her sick! Well a lot of my other friends feed their dogs pedigree chum and it goes down fine. Also the size is pretty good and not too pricy really. I think it just doesn't suit my Lola to be honest!

              @IzzyInTheHouse
              *Also posted on Ciao under the same name.

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              19.02.2008 18:37
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              A good quality wet dog food that the canines all seem to love

              We have two wee dogs in our household. Our old lady is a 12-year-old Japanese Spitz (pure white) called Snowy, and the newcomer is a 2-year-old Jack Russell Terrier called Pepper. (Spots)

              We love the two of them to bits. It's amazing just how faithful a dog is to its owners, and how they repay any kindness shown them about ten times over with the affection they show you.

              What to feed them is a constant bone of contention (not a dog bone though, heh, heh) between myself and my wife. She prefers that dry dog food. You know the type of thing. Round wee bits of hard meat flavoured biscuit (called Madra) that for all the world looks like sheep droppings.

              Now I wouldn't fancy surviving on that kind of diet, so by my reckoning the dogs probably get sick of it as well. Although, in fairness, they do seem to gobble it down OK.

              So I'm forever buying them little treats, like hearts from the butchers, and "wet" dog food, which basically just means meat in some sort of flavoured gravy. You are actually spoiled for choice when it comes to the selection of wet dog food available on the shelves of the local supermarket. Pal, Cesar, Brandy, to name only three of the most popular here in Ireland. But the one my own wee treasures enjoy the most is Pedigree Chum.

              It's a bit dearer than most of the other brands, but I reckon that's because it's the market leader and the best quality brand available. Not only that but you can buy it in a whole different selection of flavours.

              Original
              Beef Chunks in Jelly
              Chicken Chunks in Jelly
              Chicken With Sunflower Oil
              Lamb Chunks in Jelly
              Lamb & Rice Chunks in Gravy
              Rabbit Chunks in Gravy
              Tripe Mix

              When you open the tin the meaty smell hits you immediately, and you can visually see the large chunks of meat surrounded by the jelly type gravy. At this point my two dogs are generally going berserk to get their nashers into it, so it must taste great. (At least, it must taste great to dogs; if you think I'm actually going to taste it personally in order to write a dooyoo review then you're sadly mistaken!)

              My doggies don't care what flavour you put down in front of them. In fact, they wolf it down so quickly I'd be surprised if they even get the chance to taste what flavour it is!

              That said, I was surprised to read on the tin that it actually only contains 4% actual meat. The rest is made up of a mixture of vegetables, fat, cereals and minerals. Quite how they manage to get it looking quite so meat like in appearance and why the dogs go crazy for it is something of a mystery!

              Prices vary, but I'd generally pay somewhere in the region of 70 cents to Euro1.10 for a 385 gram weight can, which I then split between the two dogs. (Cheap enough) Of course, you can also buy it in plastic bags, multi-packs, etc which can bring the price down a bit.

              Recommended by me, but more especially highly recommended by my two wee dogs.

              **********

              © KenJ February 2008

              **********

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                11.12.2006 18:45
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                not worth the money

                we have recently bought a staffie puppy and she had already been weaned onto pedigree chum, so we decided to keep her on that.we took her straight to the vets the same day to get wormed.only after a couple of days we noticed that she was eating her own feaces.so we took her back to the vets thinking she maybe had worms.they confimed she never and that its because shes constantly hungry that shes eating her feaces.they told me that pedigree chum meat doesnt fill a puppies tummy very well, and to try dry complete food.and if that doesnt help then to give her pineapple (as dogs dont like the taste of pineapple in there feaces after its been digested)we were really dissapointed as we wanted to keep her on this meat

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                  04.10.2006 11:19
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                  A good quality dog food for all ages of dog

                  We have recently bought a puppy. She’s eight weeks old, a Jack Russell terrier and we have called her Pixie. She had been weaned onto Pedigree Chum Puppy food, so we continued to buy this for her, as it was what she was used to. We didn’t want to upset her delicate puppy tummy by changing it to something else.

                  We also have an old Jack Russell X Chihuahua called Katy. We buy her various types of food, as she gets bored after a while. She’s on Winalot at the moment. She does like Pedigree Chum, but it’s a bit more expensive so we don’t buy it for her very often.

                  We shop at Asda and they sell a pack of six 400g tins of Pedigree Chum Puppy food for £3.40. They sell a similar thing by Butchers for £2.58 but the tins are only 300g ones. Winalot sell 400g tins in the puppy range, but only in packs of three tins for £1.58, so in comparison, the Pedigree Chum version is good value.

                  Pedigree Chum Puppy comes in three different varieties in the six tin pack – original, lamb with rice and chicken with rice. They all look similar when you look at the food itself; they are generally a pinky kind of mush and not at all appetizing looking! But then, I’m a vegetarian adult human, not a meat-eating canine baby.

                  The real test comes when the food is given to Pixie and she loves it. She has around a tin a day or a bit less, which I usually share out over the day. The side of the tin has a little chart printed on it, which illustrates how much you should feed your puppy, depending on its age and size.

                  The tin itself is very informative actually. As well as explaining clearly on the front that it is suitable for puppies from the age of six weeks up to a year old, the back (which is rather crowded) explains the benefits of the food.

                  They claim it is ideal for puppies and contains calcium (to help teeth and bones), vitamin E and minerals (for natural defences) and protein (for muscle growth). Although they are rather small, the packaging also contains two useful telephone numbers and website addresses for a Careline and to send off for a free Pedigree Chum puppy pack.

                  Overall, I am very impressed with Pedigree Chum puppy food and would definitely recommend it. There are only a couple of things which annoy me about it. One thing is that it isn’t stocked by as many shops as I would like it to be. (Only the big supermarkets seem to have it, not the smaller corner shops.) Also, as most of us shop weekly, why is the dog food only available in packs of SIX? Why not sell it in packs of seven tins, to get through a whole week?

                  Pedigree Chum also has other foods in their puppy range. They sell the pouches, chunks in jelly and the complete variety. You can find out more about all these here - http://www.uk.pedigree.com/products/puppy.asp

                  Their website is also useful for finding out more about raising a puppy and helping it to be healthy. You can join their Puppy Club and receive newsletters where you can follow the progress of puppies at various stages of life. You can add your own information and photos about your own puppy too.

                  The only real problem I have with feeding pixie the Pedigree Chum Puppy food is keeping my other dog Katy away from it! We put their feeding bowls in different rooms and Katy’s food is blocked off from Pixie, but it doesn’t work so well the other way round! So, another vote for Pedigree Chum Puppy from Katy too! A big PAWS UP from us here.

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                    23.04.2006 19:44

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                    Good product - if your dog isnt as fussy as mine !

                    Here we are with our little dog - a cute Yorkie called Dizzy.
                    He's just over four - but for about 2 years he's been completely spoilt regarding food - his interest in dog food has been zero.
                    Preferring cat food, or human food (a favourite is shepherds pie)- Dizzy has grown rather rotund (those less polite might say he was just plain fat).

                    So, off we go to the vet who advises a stricter diet - no treats and nibbles - and a lower calorie food.
                    My next stop was to the pet supermarket, and the dog food aisle, where I disocver that Pedigree Chum comes different varieties for different dogs.
                    Special puppy recipe, standard proper dog recipe and older dog recipe etc...
                    Well, I never !
                    Arms piled with the version that is specially designed for 'less active' dogs (that means those that are lazy buggers, or just too lardy-arsed) - I come home and try my very best to pursuade the dog to eat it.
                    Not a chance.
                    I am sure its a lovely recipe, ideal for the fatter dog, but mine wont touch it.
                    Perhaps if I mixed in some shepherds pie.............?

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                    19.03.2006 17:10
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                    A good product as far as I could tell

                    The time had come to change from the puppy food to something a bit more substantial for the latest member to our little family. During her formative months she had been ever so keen on Pedigree Puppy formula mixed with Pedigree Complete mixer, so we naturally assumed that the jump to Pedigree Dog Food would be no problem.

                    You can buy these tins separately for around 49p per can, but as usual there are deals to be had by buying in multi-pack. 6 cans for £2.69. They come in a variety of flavours; the one we chose for Tasha on her first venture was the Chicken variety.

                    The tins containing the meaty feast have a label which is a not so bright yellow colour with PEDIGREE in white lettering emblazoned across the top with a red circle behind the middle letters of the word. The bottom portion of the labeling is a pretty green colour with information on the flavour.

                    On opening the can there is an instant hit of meaty smell which actually smells quite inviting, although I did stop short of participating. As with most dog food it all seems to be packed ever so tightly together. Breaking it up into decent sized portions with a fork I couldn't help notice that there were so fairly hefty chunks of meat in there along with what appeared to be rice. There was a medium amount of that jelly stuff and a clearly visible amount of congealed gravy looking stuff. Now to me the appearance was not overly appetising, but it did smell good, have I already mentioned that must be getting carried away here?

                    The consistency was very good at least it looked to be, it did not seem to dry and the moist chunks I thought were definitely going to please my little puppy friend. For about 3 weeks she appeared to be enjoying her dinner times as we changed from variety to variety, then for some reason she decided she had had enough.

                    We changed to a different brand and she ate her meals again, we has since tried her again on pedigree but NO she won't have any of it. To me the product seemed to be great value for money and Tasha obviously agreed.......................at least for 3 weeks she did. We are probably spoiling her a bit rotten and she perhaps expects something better but from what I saw and smelled Pedigree did seem to be a very good product.

                    I know that if I have had the same meal regularly over a period of time then I do tend to get a bit fed up with it even to the point of no longer liking it. So perhaps in the future Tasha will again partake of what to me seems a very reasonable meal for a cute little puppy dog.

                    The product has nutritional additives to provoke health in your canine friend, but it is up to the individual to ensure the health and well being of their canine companion.

                    We do use other pedigree products for our little friend and she seems to appreciate the quality of them, I have however no reason to believe the quality of this product is inferior to the others so it must be simply a case of TASHA being a FUSSY LITTLE BITCH. This in no way of course alters my affections towards her, she is a wonderful little puppy and a good friend.

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                      26.01.2006 11:18
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                      Well known dog food and can be trusted

                      Ever since our Border collie dog Chloe came to live with us at 9 weeks old we have given her Pedigree Chum. It started off as Pedigree Chum Puppy food and we moved on eventually to the adult version, which is what I will review now.

                      I always buy the variety in gravy for Chloe. This has got nothing to do with what she likes unfortunately. It has everything to do with the fact that I find it a lot easier to get out of the tin, and break up in her bowl. I have to do this fairly quickly as with a cat and a dog, meal time are a little tense between the two, until they both have a bowl in front of them. Even then, one is outside and one is inside! Anyway in the words of Mike Reid - I digress!!

                      I buy these tins of dog food in packs of 6, although Sainsbury’s have just started to sell the gravy variety in packs of 12. There is not a massive saving in buying the bigger pack but it is much easier to lug it indoors in bigger packs, so I have actually started to buy this one. However Sainsbury’s also have the packs of 6 on offer at the moment so these are my choice until the offer ends.

                      In the packs of 6, you get three different flavours. Two of each kind and all are in gravy. The flavours are Chicken & Game, Beef & Poultry and Lamb & Poultry. They cost £2.65 although are on offer for £4 for 2 packs.

                      The tins are all the kind that has the little pulley thing on top so you do not need a can opener to get into the tin. I love these tins. Beware though as I find when you are pulling the last bit of the lid off, the gravy will always slop out onto your fingers. Yuk.

                      The chunks of meat are a nice size in these tins. They are all cubed shaped and surrounded by thick rich looking gravy. The gravy is set enough so that it goes all the way down the tin and does not all sit at the top leaving dryer meat chunks at the bottom. Chloe has half a tin in the morning and half a tin in the evening so this is quite a nice feature of this meat.

                      I have to say the smell of these is not exactly nice. But what do you expect from a tin of cold meat and gravy!!

                      The taste test as done by my lovely dog is as follows:

                      7am put the food down on the floor.
                      7.01am the food is pretty much gone.
                      Chloe is licking her lips and wiping her nose all over the hallway carpet. She seems happy and full and I think she enjoyed it.

                      The tins themselves have a lot of information on them with regard to feeding guides, ingredients and claims of excellent nutritional value as it was developed with vets.

                      All in all, the food does seem to be good for Chloe. Her coat is always shiny and healthy looking and she has never suffered any bowel or digestive problems. (Except when she eats wet wipes or something!!)

                      I would recommend this food for your dog as it is a tried and tested brand and for me a trusted one.

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                        24.12.2000 16:22
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                        I have tried(not personally you understand!!), most varietys of dog food but always seem to come back to Pedigree Chum. I think as a trusted brand that it is a lot better for my dog and my dog seems to agree. Certain other brands of dog food are left in the bowl, where as Chum goes down in a couple of minutes, Its available in lots of flavours now, rabbit, lamb, tuna,chicken, lamb and rice, chicken and sunflower oil.Or there are my dogs favourite, meaty chunks in gravy.This is particularly good if your dog has a mixer with their meant as it coats the biscuits and makes them more appealing. It is available in either small tins, medium or large and although it is a little more expensive than others I feel that it's worth it.Some other dog foods seem to give my dog an upset stomach but Chum never has.I like to think I am giving my dog the best quality dog food as she deserves it and any dog owner would want to keep their dog happy and well nourished.

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