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      25.11.2001 17:20
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      how many times have I seen it. People go out and spend all their hard earned/borrowed cash on a lovely brand new drum kit, get it home and then realise they've only got an old set of ten pound chinese cymbals to accompany it. Actually I have done this myself but realised when I was gigging and someone said my "brass" sounded crap that I needed to sort it out. Since then I've realised that you really want to be spending approximately 2/3 of what you spend on the drums on the cymbals to have a decent overall sound. It is not until you record that you realise how obvious a cheap set of cymbals is. Cymbals come in a large variety of makes, materials and sizes. Essentially the cheapest cymbals are made of brass which can be picked up quite cheap, are generally durable but don't sound too hot. The next up are alloys called B8 and B12. B12 is better than B8 due to its composition. However the best cymbals are bronze made. Different construction techniques exist. On the one side is Paiste who have a very high-tech computer designed approach and a corresponding very clean sound. Zildijan and Istanbul pursue older more hand made techniques with possibly a fuller, more complex sound. Which sizes of cymbals depends on what style of music you play. For general use probably a pair of 14" hi-hats, 15" and 18" crashes and a 20" ride makes a good compromise. Second hand cymbals can be absolute bargains assuming you check them well. It does make it more difficult to have a matching set though and having cymbals that match is quite important I think. Go and play the cymbals with your drumkit before you buy them. Either bring your drums into the shop or borrow them for the day. If they won't let you do this, go elsewhere. For the record I have a set of Meinl Reference Class Cymbals which give a very clean and modern sound to go with my Remo Encore kit. DONT NEGLECT YOUR C YMBALS

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        16.08.2001 21:06
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        Right, So you've spend your cash on a lovely Purple Sparkle genuine 60's throwback Ludwig... got the Ringo wig.......forgot something matey?! Cymbals - Don't forget these babies....Good ones can make a Average Kit sound Great and Bad ones can make a great kit sound bad - geddit?! Which brings me on to the cymbals I use. I have a 8 yr old Premier Apk Fusion Kit, which I'm the first to admit is well past its 'replace me' date...but what keeps it going strong for the amount of gigs I do is the cymbals. i currently use 13" Ziljian A Customs Hi-hats (these are lussshhh!), 8" A Custom Splash (Very Sweet), 14" UFIP Crash, 16 Zildjian Crash and a 20" Custom Ride. The UFIPs are nice but my next task is to get Zildjian all the way round the kit....they cut through like a knife through butter, whatever sort of music you play, from jazz to rock (and I Do!) If you can afford it, I'd recommend Zildjians anyday....save up for 'em - don't just get what you can afford at the time! Zildjian A Custom - Crisp cutting sound - Good general cymbal for most types of music Zildjian K's - Darker Sound but still suitable for most types. Like i say - Cymbals can make a huge difference, but the only way to choose is to go to a drum shop....and hit 'em! Don't forget to take a cymbal of your own if your have one so that you can get a good idea of what a new cymbal really sounds like.....oh yeah, and never pay the price stuck on the cymbal - haggle and see if you can get a couple of sticks thrown in as well! Bum tit Bum bum bum tit ;oP

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