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      30.08.2008 19:14
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      I have always wanted to learn the drums so when a guy at my work said he was selling his i thought why not give it a try. **My experience** Before buying it off him i decided to check online and make sure that i was getting a good deal ,which i did!! The brand i purchased from him is called premier which i found out is one of the more famous ones. I got everything i needed apart from a snare drum (which i bought separately)and i paid £200 altogether . My kit contains 10 drums Including Stands, Pedals and Solar Cymbal Set ,everything you expect to find really.Having looked online i could easily have paid about £900 and when i think about the fact i got free lessons as well i was extremely lucky!! I would say that this is one of the best purchases i have ever made the only problem i have is that it takes up so much space,so maybe if i bought a new one i would go electric as they take up much less space **In general** This is a really good purchase to make,it is so much fun and it helps my hand /eye coordinating that is really bad. If you are worried about the noise the guy i bought it from (who's a sound engineer) suggested filling the drums with pillows and that to make them less noisy. I would also say unless you have a lot of money they are better to buy second hand,instead of a cheap new one.I have seen people buy cheap new ones and they aren't as good as mine

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        01.05.2008 18:53
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        Something to get you into music

        Getting started! If you are looking to buy a set of drums to start practising on then you want to keep a few things in mind. If you are serious about learning it is allways worth spending that little bit extra money in order to get a kit that will last you for a while. Sometimes with cheap kits that cost around £150 - £200 you are going to find that not only is the build quality poor but the overall sound will be terrible and may put you off playing! I understand that for people like students or parents investing in a kit for their children money is an issue. To solve this you could look on ebay or a similar site. Here you can pick up a second hand kit for half the normal price. Even though the kit is second hand if you look for makes like Pearl or Mapex and make sure it has been well treated, you shouldn't need to worry. A well made kit is quite a durable thing. Make sure with the seller that the skins on the shells are in good order also. These can be quite pricey (£20 each!) and could explain something that looks like a bargain. Also it may be worth asking about the stands for the cymblas. These too can be expensive things to replace but are essential! This brings me on to cymbals. If you are buying second hand chances are you will get cymbals included. Some bundles of new kits also come with cymbal sets. Sabian have budget sets that whilst are cheap, they aren't the greatest sound. If your just starting out this shouldn't be a problem. I personally started with a Sabian Solar set and have upgraded over the years when I could afford it. Speaking of my kit I have a Mapex M series (the fusion version). It cost around £550 new with the starter set of cymblas included. It is a great kit. im still using it now 5 years on and I have only had to replace the bass drum skin (which was my fault). There is a deal on with Mapex kits at the moment where you get a free fourth tom. Normally a kit only has 3 toms (hi tom, low tom and floor tom) and you could always put the free one back on ebay if you found it wasn't essential. The snare is a very important bit of the kit and with the mapex you get a very good one. It has a great sound and you wont really need to upgrade it until you get serious! If you are looking to spend quite a bit of money I would put it into the cymbals. This way you could choose your own and find the sounds you like. Drum stores normally have second hand cymbals. Again just because its second hand isn't a bad thing. Sometimes after a bit o use a cymbal actually sounds better. Say you had a cymbal starter set which included a 16" crash, 14 " hi-hats and a 20 " ride, you could invest in an extra 18" rock crash. You can never have enough cymbals as they really open up your options whilst playing or improvising!. I hope this helps anyone looking to buy a kit. Drums are a great instrument. If you find guitar a pain to learn or you just like hitting things then dums are for you!

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          09.05.2007 15:43
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          I would recommend thie TD3KW it if you have the money to spend on a practice kit

          The problem with all reviews is that it can be a justification as to why one bought it! However I would not hesitate to get rid of it if I thought it was not right for me, so read on and take this entirely at face value, but remember it's from MY perspective. Hi, decided after 40 years not playing to get over the transition from military to rock drummer. Found a studio and a good tutor and booked lessons. Told him, want enough to bash out a solid rock beat and a couple of neat fills first, 3 lessons, and we worry about technique if I like it. Done. Expected acoustic kit but he had a Roland TD3 in his studio, a tandem pair in fact, one for us both. Bitterly disappointed as I had tried some pads a long while ago and found them dead as s***. He put the headphones on me, said bash away and WOW, man, it was like the beach landing scene in Saving Private Ryan! I could not believe it. After the lesson I surfed e-bay but they were selling used for nearly as much as a new kit, there are some mugs around.... Knocked that on the head and mail ordered one x TD 3KW from Rocking Rooster at £599 (good firm). It came so welllllllllllll packed it was a pain, everthing tripple wrapped in plastic plastic and boxes in more boxes. Took an hour to set up the "scaffolding" and get the pads screwed on and connected, plugged in the 'phones and away we went. After a couple of days I worked out how to use the synth controls and set up a perfect couple of kits for me, one rock and one jazz. The snare sits where it should on a separate arm between my legs, 3 toms nicely positioned and set up for fusion or rock at will above and side of where the 22 bass would be, hi hats and foot pedal, kick pedal (had to buy the beater and a throne seperately, forgot that so played night one standing up) and a crash and a ride. The scaffolding is well made, plastic coated and the clamps once set are immovable, uses a neat key tightener. The snare tension is tunable like the real thing, and electronically you can set the attack and decay profiles of the cymbals to get them just right for your style of playing.(optional, as it all comes with a general purpose setting and a master reset in case you screw it all up). The triggers and volume on the pads / cymbals are individual too, so you can decided how hard you want to hit the thing to get sound out of it. Snare has Rim, centre and edge shots. It has an extra input to the audio module, and I am going to add another general purpose pad so I can get either a cymbal, tambourine, cowbell or tom out of it as needed.That will be £90 for pad stand and cable. Then I learned how to feed my Mp3player and PC / DVD Tutor into it, and get the output into my 100W gaming speakers. What's good about it? Well, everything!! Sounds right, feels right and I can practise into the early hours hitting the pads as hard as I like and only annoying myself. No regrets in buying the electronic version at all despite both my tutor and friends telling me to go acoustic with deadening pads. Sorry purists, bit I need hundreds of hours on this thing and it does the job perfectly. Am now looking for an acoustic set as well. Research tells me it's got to be a Yamaha stage custom, used at around £500. I guess I am lucky that forking out for another kit is not too much of a problem and do understand people that have to make a choice for one or the other. I will keep the Roland at home and use it daily, the acoustic kit will not be set up in the house, it's only needed for gigs, and then only really for show as I could quite happily play on the Roland.

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            27.03.2007 16:08
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            There seems not to be an aftermarket powerhoop upgrade for Sonor 2005 line.

            Sonor 2005 all birch set sounds great but would stay in tune better with heavier hoops. The 10" tom has got 5 tuning lugs and the floor toms 14" and 16" 6 tuning lugs. The aftermarket triple flanged 2,3 mm steelhoops "PowerHoops" have minimum 6 holes for toms and 8 for floor toms. The upgrade for heavier hoops for Sonor 2005 owners is virtually impossible. The basic difference between Sonor 2005 and 3005 is the choice between birch and maple but the Sonor 3005 owners have also the possibility to upgrade for heavier hoops! Jazz players have a choice in 2005 range because Gibraltar makes 10" 5 hole? powerhoops and a 14" 6 hole hoop but not 16" 6 hole for us wanting more power.

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              26.12.2005 10:59
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              Most bang for your buck:)

              The Mapex V series is an awesome package for an intermediate level drummer. It's genuine basswood shells are by no means cheap or of poor quality, and when combined with the right skins, i.e REMO pinstripe ambassadors, produce a warm, resonating tone that rivals any Pearl Export, Tama Swingstar or Sonor Force. Out of the packet its hardware is functional, durable and looks great. The shalimar cymals are not so great. The pedal is responsive and with fine tuning becomes very quick. The wooden snare has a wide tuning range, from highly sensitive to an ear splitting crack. Standard with REMO UX drumheads, the snare and bass, in particular the bass, produce an unrivalled sound within the price range, the toms will need to be tuned well to perform their best with these heads. The plasma laquer looks awesome, and so do any of the coverings.

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                24.03.2003 04:55
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                • "nothing else...."

                OK, Let's get one thing straight here, I am by no means an experienced or good drummer (in the grand scheme of things) having played for only one month (todays date 23/03/03). This review is about the drum kit I am using, a Stagg/Pulse (same brand, sometimes different labelling on drums, mine are Stagg) PAO-L 20. This kit is excellent value for money. It comes, like most beginners kits, with a snare (wooden), 20" bass, and 3 toms. The drums seem to have a good finish and worksmanship looks good, especially when you consider the price. They give a nice sound (to my inexperienced ears) and look nice as well, featuring as they do chromed lugs and hoops etc. My kit came with a pair of 14" hi-hats (obviously) and a 16"crash cymbal. These are not brilliant, but on the other hand sound good compared to cymbals found on other kits in this price bracket. They feel nice and are very solid. One of the things I will probably add in the near future is a ride cymbal as this was something the kit didn't come with. The hardware is solid double braced fare and is sturdy with the exception of the hi-hat stand which can wobble around a bit under violent playing. However I put this down to my kit being on carpet, which is not as suitable as a hard surface like concrete. The drum throne is a standard round one, nice and padded. Not too good in the height adjustable stakes, but will be OK for anyone 5ft8 or over. Another thing I may add soon is different throne, as, although my current one is comfortable, I prefer motorcycle-style ones. No instructions came with the kit but in all honesty I never felt that I needed some to refer to anyway, such was the simplicity of assembly. The kit came with a pair of sticks, which are not great qualtiy but OK for practising with on pillows etc. when your mum has had enough for one day. The shop also threw in another pair, by Performance Percussion (5A type) which although f eel nice, have begun to splinter around the bottom and the tip has split in two on one stick. I find this rather dissapointing. I am now using Vic Firth 5AN (N for nylon tips) which both play and look good. Just experiment to find your preferred stick type/make etc. Overall, I would highly recommend the Stagg PAO-L 20 drum kit. I paid £300 for mine which I consider to be exceptional value considering the amount of stuff you get with it. I wouldn't think twice about recommending it to anybody, despite some small niggles (which pale into insignificance when compared with the rest of the kit). I would also recommend the service of Eric Lyndsey's music shop in catford, South East London. They were knowlegeable and friendly and full of good advice. Good job lads! I hope this review is found helpful by all. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- It's now 16/5/03 and I thought it would be a good idea to give people a bit of inforamtion as to what they may need buy in the couple of months after they first take up the drum kit. 1) A ride cymbal/crash cymbal. If your kit came with a crash then buy a ride, if it came with a ride, buy a crash...simple! You will need the other sort of cymbal quite soon, but it is possible to practice ride technique on the bell of a crash cymbal. If you don't know what the difference is between the sounds, here goes....a crash cymbal makes a loud sound, often used to end fills or sections of a song, we all know what it sounds like. A ride cymbal makes a "ting-ting" sound. It's used like a hi-hat would be, for kepping time. Price - £100 2) A metronome. Not an old fashioned one used by boring old pianists...a decent drummers metronome should have crotchers, quavers and semiquavers as well as triplets and you should be able to change the tempo. These are very useful for playing along to loops, and for harder grooves. Price - £3 5 3) A decent snare. For the first couple of months you won't notice anything, but soon after you will begin to hear a "buzz" sound after you hit your snare. A good snare should have an instant attack (the crack sound) and an instant decay (it shouldn't buzz for half a second after a hit). You will really notice the difference of a new snare. Price - £100 4) Not as important as the above items, but will make for a generally nicer playing "environment", is a new throne. I personally find the motorcycle/tractor style seats the most comfortable. At first you may entertain the idea of a throne with a back rest but as your playing posture improves, you will realise it's not really necessary. Price - £50 All this wil set you back roughly £300 which is a lot. The first thing to go for would be the cymbal followed by the snare, but you should aim to get all the kit sooner or later. It's a lot of money I know, but it's worth it in the long run. I hope this has been a useful addition.

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                  30.03.2002 00:22
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                  • "you have to pay to be good"

                  Drum kits are my life. Every one that owns one and plays it a lot comes to realise it becomes a way of life and makes you feel happier and more creative. Drum kits also helped develop my style of music playing and my musical taste. They make you truly appriciate amazing drumming in a track. Whereas before it would go unoticed. Furthermore They keep you busy maybe during an otherwise boring day. They make me feel alive. And its great being in bands and getting more friends because of it. And truly feeling appreciated.

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                    01.09.2001 18:58
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                    mapex drums are an up and coming company who are playing with the big boys of drums; pearl, tama, and premier. i recently got a mapex mars pro drum kit. It is fantastic and comes in a range of colours(depends where you shop) mapex, like lots of other kits, now use arms and clamps that don't don't go into the drums so they are not dampened... ...a nice earthy big sound. the mars pro kit consists of 5 drums, boom stand, and straight stand as well as bass pedal, hi hat, and snare stand. the bass pedal consists of a turnable top which has three different effects; plastic, felt, and wood... one of the benifits of going for a mapex mars pro is the wood snare. With the right head, its fantastic... usually these more expensive kits don't come with cymbals although deals are available... all harware is double braced and is really junky so you needn't worry about it falling over or breaking... so...if you need a decent kit, go buy a mapex...your local band instrument shop or drum store should have or be able to get them... hope this has helped in some way...

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                    21.08.2001 20:41
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                    OK, So you've had enough (or you mum has!) of Pots and Pans bashing....you know you want a kit, so what now?! A Drumkit in its basic form can cost you from £50 secondhand all the way up to £4000+, but which is right for you, and more importantly, your wallet! Right, lets start at the bottom. My first kit cost me £100, it was second hand, knackered and made up of about 3 or 4 different kits...it didn't look or sound great but for me at the time it was perfect because i was learning. If i'd bought a kit, played a bit and got bored, what have I lost?? Not a lot my friends! So if you have the uncontrollable 'urge' to beat the skins, start steady, you can always upgrade later! Beginner kits (New) Start from as little as £150....and to be fair they aren't a bad place to start. The workmanship and sound won't be great, but hey, usually you get the stool and a couple of cymbals thrown in for good measure so its a good start! Makes such as Pulse and Cannon cater nicely for this section of the market, and if you do go shopping, remember to pick the salesmans brains....chances are he'll know about as much as you! ;o) Also, see what else you can get thrown in...a couple of extra pair of sticks or money off some sound deadening pads may be a wise investment, for you and your neighbours?!! For the same amount of money, you may be able to pick up a better quality and much more durable kit. Check your local rag and bargain pages etc, or the national Rhythm magazine for all sorts of types of kit. Your main players in this sort of market will probably be your Premier/Pearl/Tama etc, so shop around, and be prepared to barter again........and don't be swayed by the colour.....close your eyes and listen! Overall, if you can, i'd say try the second hand market first....chances are the drums will be a bit beaten up, but don't let that put you off....its what they so und like remember! You should also get the extras mentioned above (i.e. Cymbals, Stool Etc) If you're feeling lazy, pop down the music shop....and haggle!!

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                      29.06.2001 03:49
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                      • "My Cymbols"

                      My Kit I have recently purchased a drum kit. A kit by Pulse Percussion, it was a cheaper kit but needless to say it does the job (makes the noises)with a bass, 3 toms, a snare a hi-hat and a cymbol which is a crash and ride. The cymbols aren't "top Notch" but for now they do the job. While the drums are great. All i need to do is replace the cymbols and i have a great kit. Problems My mum- being a mum- likes to keep the noise level down so i have time guidlines and they are preferably when shes out. I think that some drummers are underappreciated. How many drummers can you name? Summary I think drum kits are a great thing and i would recommend them but only if your willing to try hard because its not as easy as it always looks. In conclusion THE DRUMMER MAKES THE BAND the stats below are for my kit

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                        27.03.2001 00:10

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                        I bought a REMO Encore 5 piece powerkit 10 years ago for £500 new. The best thing about the drums has been their durability. I have gigged this kit on a regular basis and have only had to replace one bracket ever. Whilst being a very heavy piece of kit, the strange "acousticon" shells made of reconstituted woods are sturdy despite some early worries in the press about their strength. The sound quality is punchy and the drums sound very good with single coated heads and some slight damping. They are very loud. The one problem is that with the unique "powersnap" lugs (that enable drumheads to be changed without removing the tension screws)In the studio if one drumhead is removed (especially bass drum), there can be big problems with parts rattling. I would recommend both this drum kit and similar ones made by REMO today especially as a second hand purchase.

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                        05.02.2001 03:25
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                        I own a drum kit and I would recommend them to an age to a child of 8yr as they would be able to hold and get the feel of a drum kit and will be able to understand what is what. The drum kits I would recommend are Pearl and Yamaha as they have a perfect feel and good sound to suit any keen drummer. The reason why I recommended these two different types of drum kits is because I have owned both types and they are very good and can give a really good studio sound unlike other drum kits. If you or a young child were interested in buying a drum kit, I personally would go for Pearl or Yamaha. The drum kit you should not buy is a Mirage or any other drum kit, as they do not have good quality sound so just go for Yamaha or Pearl. other drum kits are still very good, but just not as good as these ones. trust me, i have been drumming for years and i know what is good and what is not, so i hope you like my opinion. thankyou

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                          14.12.2000 06:18

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                          Since I bought my latest drumkit The all new Peavey Radial Pro. I've had much the same response. What the f**k are they? Then I let them know what they sound like, then drummers ask where they can get a set. Imagine if you will going into the studio with say, Phil Collins and sitting at the mixing desk listening to the drums being recorded all the effects have been added and the drums sound out of this world. Right got that? That is the sound you get from these amazing drums without all the effects, the processing. They are just so resonant. These have become the drums of choice in many studios purely because they are so easy to record!!!! Just stick a mic anywhere near them and they sing out loud crisp and clear. If you want hear them in action them check out www.tweekyswind.co.uk where they have been recorded using modified mobile phone microphones into a home made mixer on my bands demo. Oh, and book the band for your pub, wedding, or summer barbeque. You know it makes sense!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Later Paul.....

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