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Meinl TMT2

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£34.96 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
1 Review

Brand: Meinl / Drums & Percussion Type: Tambourine

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      17.05.2010 23:45
      Very helpful
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      Get an LP Cyclops if you want a resilient tambourine

      I bought this to add to the percussive sounds needed for my drum kit. I play a lot of different styles of music and a tambourine gives more feeling than an adolescent boy during the last dance at the school disco. What I mean is a tambourine can add subtelty, dymanics, softness, brightness and layers to a simple drum pattern without rattling around the kit trying to produce something new or stunning. (Not sticking it up a girl's jumper).

      Simple. I'm not asking for much. I'm asking for a robust piece of kit with a shiny chink when I strike it.

      What did I get?

      Shiny chink? Check.
      Robust? Nope.

      The plastic striking surface is grooved to add an extra sound while scraping - a guiro. Handy apparently.

      But this surface barely lasted a few gigs - around 50 strikes maybe? It split and eventually 3 or 4 pieces broke off including the pin and jingles of one section. Not only that but the holding bracket that attaches to a percussion mount (a pin if you will) weakened and began to sag after a few strikes. Pretty poor resilience then.

      Ok - I can sometimes play a little heavier at times but it's poorly engineered if the mounting bracket is one piece of metal welded to the tambourine itself. Why not have two? To add to this it's not a light piece of equipment.

      I've since moved on to a Latin Percussion Cyclops - which is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Hey and guess what? Two pieces of metal as a mounting bracket so no sag and a striking surface that hasn't shattered in over 50 gigs. Oh and it's noticeably lighter in weight. Seemples.

      MTL

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