Welcome! Log in or Register

Boots Adhesive Wound Dressing 8cm x 6cm

  • image
1 Review

Brand: Boots / Type: Dressing

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    1 Review
    Sort by:
    • More +
      07.05.2012 21:27
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A useful dressing but watch out for skin reactions.

      When my children were small I decided that it was about time I put together a well-stocked First Aid kit. Although they are now much older and less likely to fall off slides and rollerblades I still think it is a good idea to have a selection of First Aid items to hand as you never know when you may be faced with an emergency.

      I saw the Boots Adhesive Wound Dressings and decided to buy the pack of 5. They are now being sold for £3.19 in most branches. They come in a slim green box with a picture of the product in use on the front.
      Each dressing is separately packed in its own sterile sachet which is really useful for popping in your handbag or the glove-compartment of the car as accidents can happen anywhere. The sterilisation has a 5 year life so you have the peace of mind of knowing they will not rapidly go out of date.

      The packet says that these are suitable for larger cuts and grazes and the size is 8cm x 6cm. I think that this is rather misleading as although the complete dressing is 8x6 the actual area for covering the wound is only 5cm x 3cm which does not actually seem much bigger than the largest plasters that you get in multipacks and I think this information should be made much clearer on the packaging.

      The dressing pad itself is made up of a product very similar (if not identical) to Melolin. It has a shiny, low adherent film that covers the injury without sticking to most wounds. This is then backed by an absorbent layer which is great for soaking up the blood or other moisture from the wound and drawing it away from the injury itself. The whole dressing is then held in place by an adhesive mesh that sticks on the skin. This has a good centimetre of so around each edge which gives a really good adherence.

      Using the dressings is really easy. After cleaning and drying the wound you simply open the paper sachet and then pull off the backing and apply rather like a large plaster. You have to be careful not to stretch the knit too much or the skin wrinkles and becomes uncomfortable. Gently smoothing the edges onto the skin after applying the central dressing over the affected area works well.

      Once in place the dressing is really flexible, it doesn't feel stiff and even when on knees or elbows it allows for sufficient movement. It can be left in place for a couple of days and then replaced if needed. The dressing acts as a cushioned protective layer as well which prevents further pain and injury.

      Once in place the dressing does not come off until it is removed on purpose. The adhesion is very strong and even though the adhesive backing can look a bit grubby and furry after a while it still doesn't peel off accidentally. I have even got the dessing wet and it has still remained very formly attached to the skin.

      Removing the dressing does take some force. The manufacturers claim that this is a low allergy adhesive that is strong but gentle. I will certainly agree that it is strong and it is a bit uncomfortable to remove. It is easiest to do by holding the skin very taut and then pulling after eventually managing to lever one of the corners up.

      The main problem I have had with these dressings is reaction to the adhesive. I do not have sensitive skin and have never reacted to any adhesives on plasters. However after wearing one of these dressings for 2 days after a minor op on my leg my skin became rather red and sore where the adhesive was and stayed itchy for a couple of days after removing it. My son had one of the dressings on his elbow after a skate-board accident. Within 24 hours the skin under the adhesive and around the area came up in yellow headed lumpy spots. The doctor said it was an allergic reaction that had got infected. The wound itself was perfectly clean and I was shocked by how quickly his skin had erupted. The manufacturers warn that people with fragile skin or dermatological conditions may have reddened skin or skin damage from using these dressings however neither I nor my son has ever had any skin problems so I think that is not entirely accurate.

      Although we have had quite extreme reactions to these dressings I still keep some at home as they are really useful for dressing more awkward wounds and are quick and easy to use in an emergency. They adhere really well and help protect the injury. However I now watch the area around the adhesive very carefully and remove the dressing as soon as I notice even the slightest reddening.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments