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Compeed Hydro Cure System

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5 Reviews

/ Type: Plasters

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    5 Reviews
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      17.07.2013 07:26
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      worth every penny

      My feet never take kindly to new shoes and you just have to love getting a blister after wearing them for a short space of time, Ideally you have to change your shoes but this is not always possible if you are out and don't have access to a spare pair. This is when my friend gave me a Compeed Blister Plaster and I must say they worked wonders and they are now a regular item in my handbag for any eventuality.

      The Compeed Blister Hydrocolloid plaster that I buy are the medium plasters, there are five in the packet. Each plaster is 4.2cm by 6.0cm and they are oval shape to work with the shape of the blister. They are not like your usual plaster they are a clear colour so that they if they are seen through your shoes you can hardly notice that you are wearing them.

      Instead of a fabric inside the plaster there is a gel that is there that helps to cushion the blister so that is does not rub and cause further damage when you are wearing your shoes. It has a hydrocure system built in that allows the plaster to absorb the moisture that is coming from the area and creates a cushion to relieve pain and stop the pressure that can build up with a normal plaster.

      These can be placed anywhere on your foot where you have a blister, be it on your heel, the most common place for a uncomfortable blister, on the side of your little toe or even on the base of your foot. Wherever there is a blister these great plasters will help.

      I thought that these would not stick to your heel and would peel off after a short space of time, but I was wrong the adhesive that they have lasts well and it does not come off until I try and remove it when I take the shoes off at the end of the night, Unfortunately the plaster does not have special powers and the blister is still there.

      There are a range of Compeed Blister plasters and they come on a range of different styles and sizes to suit, they retail from anything from over £4, but if you shop around there can be some great offers, such as my last purchase was buy one and get another half price.

      I have to say that there are a god send they are expensive at just under a £1 a plaster but they are worth every penny. Especially when you are on a night out and are trying to enjoy yourself the last thing you want is to have sore feet. These also help as it can ne dangerous taking you shoes off in a blub or a party as a glass could have been dropped and broken and that would cause far more problems with you feet than just a blister.

      A must have for any girls handbag, especially if you are a slave to fashion and are wearing shoes that are far too high or uncomfortable.

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        24.03.2011 20:40
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        Well worth using

        A few years ago my now-husband and I were flat hunting. We booked an appointment to see a new flat and as the weather was nice, decided to walk the 20 minutes from the city centre to meet the estate agent.

        And I made the mistake of wearing brand new high heels.

        I don't think I need to describe the pain of the blisters that developed, but wow. I have never ever experienced pain like it. The skin on the back of my feet, and on the sides of my big toes, were rubbed red raw, weeping with blisters, and bleeding. As soon as we passed a shop, I purchased some plasters and applied nearly the whole box, but by then the damage was done - the plasters wouldn't stick to my sore skin and rolled off.

        It took *months* for my feet to recover, and since then I have never, ever worn a new pair of shoes without first protecting my feet with Compeed Hydro-Cure. I can then wear them with confidence, stretching the shoes and wearing them in so I don't always need to use the plasters. Also, if I am to wear a pair of very high heels for a special occasion or I know I will be doing a lot of walking, I put these on as a bit of added protection.

        They are so much more than plasters, though. They are gel padded, and very soothing, protecting bunions, toes, backs of feet - they'll pretty much stick and stay anywhere on the foot. They're quite discreet, too, and so you can still go without tights or socks, or wear open-toed or strappy shoes without it being obvious that you have foot protection on! They are ever so slightly moisturising, too, so when you take them off rather than a sticky patch like when you take an elastoplast off, you simply have a well moisturised foot, rather than a dry callous.

        There are many different types of 'bunion cushions', 'gel insoles' etc but I do find these the most discreet and decent in price - a pack of 6 (I would use four out of a pack in one go however) is £4, or if you shop around online you can sometimes find them £3 - £3.50. It's always good to keep some in stock.

        So, to summarise, it's not something that I use every day but for 'special shoe occasions', new shoes, long walks, or those with a job that keeps you on your feet, or if you have bunions or even existing blisters, I can fully recommend the Compeed Hyrdo-Cure System as a great way to ensure your feet are well looked after!

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          03.11.2009 13:43
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          A must for the outdoorsy.

          I spend a fair bit of my free time in the countryside, generally running up and down the fells of the north. When I started hiking in the hills, I used to take a huge amount of kit with me, staggering around like a desperate Duke of Edinburgh student under a rucksack the size (and weight) of a small elephant. I spent a huge amount of money on high tech gear, thinking that if I spent cash, I'd get quality.

          However, over the years I realized that I didn't need or even use half of it, and that with a little bit of resourcefulness, I could get away with travelling an awful lot lighter, and buying an awful lot less. I'll still invest in quality products where I think an item is absolutely key, but I also know where to cut corners. With outdoor gear, you can sometimes end up paying an awful lot of money for something that is really not much better than a low-end value job.

          So why do I regularly shell out for the expensive and high-tech Compeed? Does it not cause me pain to spend three quid on six fancy plasters, when I could get a whole role of fabric strip from Tesco for about 60p? Quite simply, I buy it because nothing else works as well. I've road tested this product on many long runs, including a couple of bruising mountain marathons, and it really does do exactly what it says on the tin.

          There's nothing worse, when you're running or hiking than getting bad blisters. If you don't take fairly sharp action, what starts out as a bit of a warm, rubbing sensation quickly becomes an agonizing tender patch of flesh, which hurts with every step you take, drawing your attention away from both the scenery and distracting you when you need to take important route-finding decisions.

          Compeed is less a plaster and more a healing system designed specifically for these situations. In the cardboard packaging is an attractive turquoise watertight plastic box (useful for campers). Inside is a pack of small, thin plasters. As I mentioned previously, they cost around three quid each and come in three sizes: small, medium or large.

          You apply Compeed just like a regular plaster, but unlike elastoplast, it doesn't simply sit on top of your skin and prevent friction. Instead, it bonds to your skin when you put it on, covering it with a clear, translucent layer, like a small, shiny bubble. This keeps the wound sealed from further abrasion, immediately cutting down on pain and annoyance and preventing dirt and infections from starting. It also means the plaster doesn't fall off every two minutes, even if, like me, you run in wet Walsh trainers.

          But it's after this that the magic begins! Compeed draws a small amount of moisture from the wound, forming a cushion around the blistered area. It's like having a pain-free blister on top of the real blister, reducing pain and inflammation. In the longterm, the dressing really does seem to speed up the healing process (by up to 20% according to the product website), by ensuring that nutrients and moisture are evenly distributed at the wound site. I have found that it also reduces scarring, though I can't explain why this is the case. Maybe it's because the locked-in moisture means that you don't get an annoyingly hard scab forming.

          But while this is a must for anyone into extreme running or hiking, it isn't just a product for the outdoorsy. It has a multitude of other uses, not least because it's attractively clear instead of being the horrible flesh-colour of other dressings. For instance, I've used it as my secret helper in situations where I've wanted to wear ultra-uncomfortable high heels. I've also used it at a wedding to patch up a bride's scratched arm for photographs - and you couldn't even see the dressing on the photos.

          In short - this is a must-have product for anyone doing long walks or runs. Five stars.

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          03.07.2009 01:35
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          Essential kit to prevent blisters.

          My current part time job requires me to do a lot of walking up hills in awful boots, and so it is inevitable that eventually I will feel hot spots on my feet from where the boots have been rubbing against my skin. These hot spots eventually turn into blisters.

          For those of you that don't know what a blister is - a blister is a pocket of fluid between two layers of skin. It is essentially where the two layers of skin get pulled apart and get filled with fluid. The fluid is a component of the blood (lacking blood cells and clotting elements) called serum, which I would imagine acts as a protective barrier against the wound.

          There are numerous treatments on the market to treat and prevent blisters, but I use compeed. Compeed is a blister relief system (although it can be used as a blister prevention system). It works as a second skin - instead of the boot rubbing on your skin it will rub over the smooth surface of the compeed plaster. You can get them in medium (5 plasters in a pack), small (6 plasters in a pack) and also 'for your toes' (8 plasters in a pack). Medium are obviously for larger blisters such as the massive ones that you can get on your heels, small are for smaller blisters and the compeed for your toes are (drum roll please) for blisters on your toes. Each of the three types retails for around £4. I bought mine from Sainsbury's for £3.90. In boots they were £4.00.

          One complaint about the boxes of compeed that you can buy is that you can only buy one size at a time. There are no mixed boxes. I don't know if this is a ploy by the manufacturers to make you buy a box of each size, but I feel that this needs addressing. If you want all 3 sizes it will set you back about £12!

          The packaging of the compeed is a turquoise plastic box surrounded with a cardboard border which displays the product information. The packaging certainly stands out which is excellent as it means that you can find it easily whilst shopping. The plastic box is very good as it is water resistant - you wouldn't want a sudden downpour to destroy your expensive compeed plasters! The instructions for use are displayed clearly on the back of the box. The packaging is also recyclable. As a bonus they are manufactured in the UK (we have to support our economy!) by Johnson & Johnson.

          I personally would not use compeed to prevent blisters as they are far too expensive. Instead for prevention, I tape up the areas of my feet that are prone to hot spots with 'zinc oxide tape' which is available from many places including boots. Zinc oxide tape is also expensive (about £4 for 8 metres), but a roll will last a lot longer than a pack of compeed. Another prevention method is to wear 2 pairs of socks. The inner pair should be thin and the outer pair should be thick. In theory the 2 pairs should rub against each other and not against your foot, but in practise does not completely prevent blisters. So I would recommend using the zinc oxide tape as well as two pairs of socks. It's also worthwhile remembering that new boots will give you more blisters than 'worn in' boots will.

          The methods of prevention that I briefly mentioned above do not always work perfectly, and so I use compeed to treat the blisters. Compeed instantly relieves blister pain and secures itself to your foot. I always pop the blister (using a sterilised needle or knife) before applying the compeed and remove the flap of skin around the wound (using a sterilised knife). I then treat the wound with an antiseptic wipe (which hurts LOTS) and dry the area around the wound well (do not use any form of powder to dry the area otherwise the plaster will not stick). Then it is just a matter of peeling the back off the compeed plaster and smoothing it over the blister. It's important to note however that the compeed have a peelable layer on both sides of the plaster, so it is best to read the instructions so that you put it on properly (imagine the money wasted if you got it wrong!).

          The compeed repels water, dirt and germs which help to prevent infection. The plaster will stay firmly in place over the next few days, keeping the blister moist which aids healing. You should ideally leave it in place until it falls off, but I find that the sides start peeling off which then gets caught in my socks, so I just peel it off slowly when I deem necessary (and if it's still not healed then I apply a fresh one).

          Its worth mentioning that if I'm not having to go walking again the next day with blistered feet, then I would just wear 'flip flops' (to prevent rubbing) and let the blister heal naturally. It's only when I have to go walking again the next day that I will apply a compeed plaster. With a compeed plaster on a blister it is possible to carry on walking in the same boots that gave you the blister, as the boot will rub against the compeed plaster and not your skin, which means that the blister doesn't hurt. I have tried using normal plasters (the ones used to treat a cut finger) but they don't work at all, so beware.

          If you're seriously into hiking, you're in the military or you're just prone to blisters (my girlfriend gets lots of blisters when wearing high heels), these blister plasters will be a sound addition to your arsenal. If your conscious about how your feet look and want to wear a blister plaster to prevent blisters then compeed are ideal as they are quite discreet and don't draw too much attention (for example when wearing high heels, sandals, flip flops etc). They may seem a bit pricy, but surely £4.00 is better than hours and hours of pain.

          Overall I think that compeed is the best blister treatment around. It's just a shame that they are ridiculously expensive (at about 80p per plaster for the medium ones). I give them 4 stars (it would have been 5 stars if they were cheaper).

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            16.05.2004 03:36
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            I used to frequently suffer from blisters as I do a lot of walking and my walking boots were getting past their best. As I was rather starpped for cash at the time I decided to invest in some blister prevention rather than new boots. I chose compeed because it was reccommended to me by a friend. It works in a similar way to things like secon skin by creating a barrier between your skin and sock thus reducing friction and lessening the chance of blisters occuring. I wouldn't be without this now it is an absolute godsend. I haven't had a single blister since I started using it! You simply apply it to areas where you commonly get blisters before walking or as soon as you feel hotspots developing. At £4.99 for 5 pieces this stuff is certainly a necessity for any keen walker. Highly reccommended.

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          • Product Details

            Compeed is a completely new type of plaster for the effective protection and treatment of damaged skin. The unique Hydro Cure System allows the plaster to absorb moisture from the skin, forming a cushion that provides optimum healing conditions