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Scholl Blister Treatment Spray

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2 Reviews

Dosage Form: Spray / Subtype: Treatment

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    2 Reviews
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      24.04.2011 15:17
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      Blister recovery in a soothing spray

      Blisters might seem irrelevant when you think about them, but for anyone who does lots of walking, plays sport or enjoys exercise knows, these little blighters can really affect your mood and your mobility.

      Blisters are generally caused by the rubbing of skin in sensitive areas, whilst playing sport vigorously or wearing ill-fitting shoes, they generally pop causing a sore, sensitive area of skin which is just as painful, therefore it is vital to stop blisters before the have the opportunity to develop. Scholl created a blister treatment spray for just such situations.

      I bought my bottle in Boots for £3.49 for 100ml, it comes in a blue aerosol spray can with yellow wording and a yellow lid. It is available in all decent chemists and supermarkets but I have also noticed it in shoe shops and in athletic shoe shops, so it is well regarded.

      This was a godsend recently when I got a couple of blisters whilst breaking in my new footy boots, after the game the skin was sore and the fact I had raw skin rubbing really, really hurt. Once I got home, my partner sprayed this over the blistered area, she did so from the requisite distance away and it formed a protective layer over the blister, it was cold, and although I wasn't keen to touch it to allow it to do its stuff, after putting my feet up for 20 minutes I felt much more mobile and less likely to moan and grate about the horrible pain.

      The idea is to keep dressing the area until a protective layer fully forms then it is possible to peel it off, it is good as it stayed solid during my customary hot bath and also didn't just flake off as blisters can be prone to do, this proved excellent, I have about half a can left after my first two blisters so would say it is probably well priced as without it I would have spent a week using inadequate plasters and moaning lots, so my other half things its well worth it too.

      A technological and refreshing solution to blisters I recommended as a team we buy a few cans for matches so players can resolve any blisters before driving home and making them worse afterwards, we now have a couple for games and it has been commented upon a couple of times, how good this feels on the skin.

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      23.01.2002 21:48
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      Imelda Marcos, former First Lady of The Philippines, was reputed to have a collection of around 3,000 pairs of shoes. Well, all I can say is, it’s a good job she didn’t have feet like mine! I hate buying new shoes, because I know that I will spend the next few weeks in agony from blisters. In fact, I would willingly pay some to “break-in” a new pair of shoes for me. About Blisters. A blister is a fluid filled lesion which occurs on the top layer of the skin, and blisters can be very painful. Blisters can occur for a number of reasons (viral illnesses such as chicken pox or shingles, as a result of sunburn, or contact with an irritant) but in my case they are caused by the constant rubbing of shoes (friction.) The fluid in a blister is nature’s way of cushioning the deeper skin tissue against more damage, and the skin over a blister prevents infection from entering. For this reason it is generally recommended that you do not puncture the blister, since once the blister is open, bacteria are able to get in. However, if the blister is very large, or if it had burst anyway, you should gently wash the area and apply a sterile dressing. Recently, I was in London visiting relatives and went off for a spot of window-shopping wearing a pair of new (ish) shoes. Within the hour I was experiencing that familiar soreness on the balls of both feet and ankles which heralds the arrival of a crop of blisters. I hobbled along in pain for a while, before I was forced to detour into the nearest Superdrug in search of some plasters. However, on the foot care shelf I spotted a new product that I had not come across before, and which looked very interesting to a blister victim like myself. It was a blister treatment spray in a can by Scholl. The treatment comes in a 100ml spray (CFC free). The bright yellow top proclaims “NEW! The Plaster In A Spray!” The treatment is described as a &
      #8220;clinically proven spray on dressing, soothing and cooling for the treatment and prevention of blisters.” The spray was priced at £3.49,just slightly more expensive than the blister dressing I had intended to purchase, however, I reasoned that the spray would probably last longer and therefore be better value in the long run. So I hobbled to the checkout, paid up and then set off for the nearest Ladies to treat my feet. As I uncovered my feet I winced at the three huge blisters which had formed. The instructions on the can of Blister Treatment Spray say to spray a short burst into the air to clear the nozzle and then, holding the nozzle 5-10cms from the sore spot, spray upright in 5-10 short bursts, until a covering is achieved over the blister. Then, allow the spray to dry. If you feel it necessary, you can apply further layers. You do not need to apply a plaster. The spray dries into a plaster…clever, eh? How does it feel? Mmm…bliss! The spray is cool and soothing on hot, sore tootsies, and I was able to continue walking with much reduced discomfort. I cannot pretend that there was no pain at all from the blisters, but it was bearable and I could walk more or less normally. On arriving home I applied another layer of the treatment. Here is a little warning. Always allow the spray to dry thoroughly before putting on tights, socks or slippers. I slipped my feet into my slippers before the spray had tried and my feet became adhered to the insoles, and I had to prise my slippers off. The advice given on the can for the removal of the layers of dried-on treatment is to soak your feet in soapy water and peel the dressing away from the edges, or to simply allow the dressing to wear off gradually, which I did. What happened next was amazing. The blisters dried up, just like that. I’m sure they didn’t burst, as I was not aware of any fluid seeping from them. But within a couple of day
      s they had dried into a shell which eventually peeled off the soles of my feet with no discomfort at all. I was very impressed by this new product and intend to keep a can in my bathroom cabinet for future use (I am due to buy a new pair of shoes in 2006!) For those who may like to know, the active ingredients in Scholl Blister Treatment Spray are: Dimethyl Ether Cyclohexane Styrene-Isoprene Block Copolymer Cautions: The treatment should not be used on broken or bleeding skin, and should be immediately discontinued if irritation occurs. Scholl Blister Treatment Spray is NOT suitable for use by diabetics. The spray is in a pressurised can and should be used safely i.e.: keep out of sunlight, do not expose to high temperatures, do not burn or puncture the can, even when empty, and keep out of the reach of children. Do NOT inhale the contents. Scholl Blister Treatment Spray is made in the UK by Seton Scholl Healthcare plc ps. although Dooyoo has put this opinion in Kids and Family,the spray is suitable for all age groups.

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    • Product Details

      A spray on treatment for blisters and sore spots.