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Smith & Nephew Jelonet

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£19.99 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
1 Review

Brand: Smith & Nephew / Type: Parrafin Gauze Dressing

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    1 Review
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      24.10.2012 17:11
      Very helpful
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      I'd definitely recommend these dressings

      Jelonet dressings are made by the company Smith and Nephew, they are available in boxes of various sizes and quantities. The last box I bought contains 10 dressings measuring 10x10cm. I've previously had the smaller 5x5cm dressings and much larger are available. Each square comes in a sachet which is like paper on the outside and aliminium on the inside, it isn't recommended to cut a bit off and use the dressing again as it isn't guaranteed to be sterile but I sometimes do this with minor grazes, although not with open wounds.
      These dressings are available online for between £6-7.

      The dressing is a paraffin gauze which reminds me of net covered in a vaseline like substance. They are designed to act as a primary wound contact layer, allowing drainage to another dressing. It is very flexible which is good and can be cut to size without it fraying. I had lots of these dressings and they lasted me for years but as soon as the last one was gone I ordered more online as I think they are a really useful thing to have.

      I was first introduced to these dressings a few years ago, I will try to explain why the doctor gave me these without being too graphic so you have a better understanding of what they may be used for.

      At the time we had carpeted stairs which I had a habit of falling down regularly. On this particular day my big toe got caught on those awful spiky grips under the carpet which tore a few layers of skin off the end of my big toe leaving it almost flat and a bit bloody and nasty.

      I then went to the doctors and he gave me a box of these dressings, I was able to use an antiseptic cream, cover the wound in these and then put a dressing over the top allowing the wound to drain onto the other dressing.

      Any nasty scrapes and grazes I will cut a piece of this to size and put it on before covering with a dressing or plaster. Due to the greasiness of the paraffin on these dressings you will need a good strong dressing as some plasters just slip off.

      I recently grazed my elbow and had some loose skin and although the graze wasn't serious enough to need a dressing my clothing kept rubbing against my graze causing pain and discomfort so I used this with another dressing over the top to stop clothing rubbing on it and without needing to worry that the other dressing would be pulling off any loose skin when I removed it.

      I have also heard that these dressings have been recommended to people who have experienced cracked nipples from breast feeding. It's also supposed to help breast pads not to stick.

      The dressings can be used for burns, cuts, grazes, skin grafts and ulcers.
      The dressing is not medicated so it can be used with antiseptic or antibiotic creams.

      I have read that these dressings can stick a bit to a wound, I would imagine this is in the cases such as burns and ulcers where the wound may weep a lot. I find with smaller wounds it has the opposite effect and the paraffin on the gauze makes it slippy and stops it from sticking to another dressing. Changing the dressing often should prevent any sticking.


      Overall
      I think these are great, I hate the thought of putting a fluffy dressing or plaster directly onto a wound that is likely to bleed or weep and dread removing them in case they have stuck and I find this adds moisture and is very effective at preventing sticking.

      The thing I really like about this type of dressing is the flexibility, it can easily be wrapped around tricky areas like fingers and toes.
      It seems they are designed for more severe wounds but I use them on the smallest thing and think they're great.

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