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Powerball 250 Hz

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The Powerball 250 Hz is a unique form of exercise. It is made using a gyroscope, which when used correctly can provide resistance training for your arms. It's good fun and durable, although a little pricey.

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      28.10.2014 20:07
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      Fun little exercise ball, not just for sports people. Every home should have one.

      Having heard so much about this I finally decided to get one to see what all the fuss was about.
      So many to choose from I just went with the basic model for £10 but now wish I had of paid a little extra and got one with the LED on so I would of been able see speed and other things.
      At first when I got it out the box I starting spinning it around like I had seen in the videos but nothing was happening, then after a quick look at some Youtube videos found out you need to use the string provided to get it started, put it in one of the little holes roll it round then pull, does not really take that long to get started, just move your hand left to right to get the ball speeded up then if you relax your hand the ball will move your hand/wrist in the right way then you just speed up the process.
      It tires your arm out a bit like when you are mixing a bowel of ingredients when cooking but it's additive and you keep going and the neon light is fun if doing it in a dark room but one bad thing I would say about it is when your are going fast I found it slipping out of my hand and needed to stop to get a better grip.
      These are not just for sports people, if you don't use your arms much or get pain in your wrists from moving that mouse around to much on your computer this is perfect for you as it will help and give you that little bit exercise they need.

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      03.04.2014 14:13
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      • "Good value for money"
      • "Improves wrist strength"

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      • "Technique tricky to learn"

      Awesome once you have the technique nailed

      I suffer from sore wrists so was looking for a way to strengthen them and this has really helped. The Gyro works on the momentum from wrist rotation, to keep the ball spinning. The momentum in turn, puts resistance on the wrist, forearm, bicep and (apparently) the pectoral muscles.

      Once you have the technique sorted to keep the gyro spinning you can do it for as long as your arms are capable. After about 2-3 minutes of the exercise you can feel the burn in your forearms and biceps. I tend to do 10 minutes a day on each arm and that is more than enough to generate enough of a burn to stop you typing and clenching!!

      The Gyro comes with a disk containing different exercises and techniques for using the Gyro and is recommended for those interested in activities such as tennis, squash, badminton, fencing, climbing, guitarists and anything that uses a grip and forearms.

      Overall a great product, I would recommend not knocking it if you can't get the technique at first, took me a while but once you have it down its very beneficial.

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      08.08.2013 00:09
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      Great Product

      When your looking for an advantage in sport you always seek to try and get ahead of the competition and this I think is the solution of the problem. Although many people on here have used this for health reason such as carpel tunnel and RSI, the balls ability to strength the wrist is what I was looking for. And for 10 pounds how could you not simple just give it a go.

      When you unbox the item you get a very simple and easy to understand manual that pretty much explain all someone needs to know. Although myself I didn't need to ready this as all as I was recommended the item by a friend I read it in pure curiosity instead. The box itself include the two starting cords and a very and along with the manuals that's really about it.

      Now unbox the fun really begins as you insert the rope into the power ball and place the rope into the grove while spinning the giro inside to feed the rope around the whole giro . You then pull the cord to turn and produce speed within the ball and then you circulating your hand to try and increase the speed. This will also be encouraged by the led that lights up as the ball increases in speed.

      After all this and after just a couple of weeks I found a real difference. As someone who has particularly weak wrist I also think that this would be great for someone rebuilding the muscles within the wrist and I found that it did great things for me so I would highly recommend it.

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      06.08.2013 14:44
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      A unique piece of equipment which has many uses

      You may be wondering what on earth this 'power ball' is if you have not heard of it before. Well, let me enlighten you! It's a small handheld ball, which contains a gyroscope. The idea is that you spin the gyroscope to reach increasing speeds by performing small circular wrist movements with the ball in one hand. As the gyroscope reaches high speeds and a high RPM (rotations per minute), you feel the force building up in your hand radiating through your whole arm up to your shoulder. This force created is said to help tone your arm muscles and provide a bit of a workout.

      *Design*

      The powerball is available as a regular powerball in amber and blue colours. The regular model is opposed to the 'pro' model, which features a screen on the top letting you know how many RPM you have achieved. The powerball has a rubbery sleeve around the side with 'Power Ball 250Hz Gyroscope' in large bold letters along it. There is a similar design on the top with the motto - "can you handle this?" The outer casing is translucent so that you can see through to a neon coloured gyroscope inside, which spins. The ball has a simple design and is of a reasonably small size. However, I still find it a bit chunky and in fact painful to hold when such a force is created within your hand. The gyroscope comes with a red string with a plastic coating on each end, rather like a shoe lace. This is used to insert into the gyroscope through a little gap in the casing.

      *Using The Powerball*

      To get going at first, you can use the string that comes with the gyroscope to set it off. You insert one end into a little hole within the gyroscope, then turn the gyroscope round to wrap the string around, which sits in a little groove. You then sharply pull the other end of the string to get it spinning. As you become more familiar with the powerball, you can start it manually with your thumb which is a lot more efficient!

      I use slow and large diameter wrist movements to get the gyroscope spinning. As you build speed, faster and smaller diameter wrist movements keeps the speed going up. I found it tricky to purely use my wrist to get it moving rather than my whole hand/arm - a lot of people have this problem when they try it!

      Once it gains speed, you really can feel the force within your hand and arm. It surely helps to improve your grip, but at the compromise of comfort due to, in my opinion, the slightly bulky design. You can feel your muscles contracting to withhold the force in your hand, and this certainly gives your arm a good workout!

      *What is it For?*

      The powerball can be used to simply tone your arm or to improve grip and help strengthen your arm for various sports. The makers claim that the powerball can help with pretty much any sport involving your arms, you name it! Tennis, badminton, swimming and golf are just a few.

      Personally, I tend to pick my powerball up when I'm bored and give it a spin. It's a nice distraction when revising for exams too. It can also distract you from other things since your hand is occupied such as smoking and nail-biting. I find it is a reasonably good stress reliever as you can spin it faster and faster and it really does wear you out! I severely doubt you could gain much muscle with this alone, but it must be good for 'toning' your arms i.e. adding some lean muscle and helping to shed a bit of the fat - purely through the exercise you are doing whilst using it.

      *Tell Me About Costs*

      The regular powerball costs around £10. This isn't overly cheap, nor is it a rip off - pretty standard price for one of those eye-catching gadgets you see around. To be honest, I am happy having paid a little less than this when I first got it. I still use my powerball every now and then, and it is very durable too.

      *Summary*

      The powerball is a unique piece of 'sports equipment' - more a gadget that is both fun and provides a reasonable workout. In reality the powerball can be used for several things:

      * Toning arms
      * Distractions for habits e.g. smoking/nail biting
      * Rehabilitation for arm injuries
      * Something to use when bored
      * To improve grip
      * To help train your arms towards sports

      Taking its many uses into consideration, I think this unique tool is worth considering if you fancy it. I have had plenty of fun with mine, and friends always want to try it when they see it in my room.

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        16.05.2012 20:01
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        A great upper body workout

        My boyfriend bought one of these powerballs and I steal it off him whilst he's at work.

        We bought ours off Amazon.co.uk for just under £10.

        The powerball takes a bit of getting used to. You have to insert the cord into the ball, which can be a little fiddly to begin with. However once you get used to it it is pretty easy to do. You then have to keep the ball spinning using your wrists and arms. The ball is a great upper body exercise. It really helps to tone up your arms and it deals with those "bingo wings" whilst burning off calories. Some of the balls have a small LCD screen but this one doesn't as it's only a simple version. However I don't think i'd have time to look at the screen as all of the time i'm trying my best to keep the ball spinning!

        I can feel a difference in my arms since using this. They're are more toned and less flabby, plus I have more upper body strength. The ball is really durable and long lasting. We've had ours for months and it's still as good as new. It doesn't take up any space and you can take it out and about with you, great for travelling if you fancy toning up on your hols!

        I would recommend these Powerballs for a quick exercise fix. They're available to buy in different colours and styles too. Try one!

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          22.04.2012 23:43
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          Good fun, not much good at training your arms i think

          The NSD powerball is a nifty little gadget, that works on the principles of how gyroscopes work. Gyroscopes are simply just objects that spin. When an object spins, it will continue to spin in such a way, and will carry on spinning in that plane unless another force alters the direction. This principle is used in planes... boats, helicopters, and many other devices, as by having a spinning part that will always spin in a certain direction, then the onboard computer can define that motion of spin as a plan. Aka, in the case of a helicopter, the gyroscope could spin upwards, and using sensors either side of the gyroscope, the helicopte "knows" which way up is.

          Anyway, thats the science about gyroscopes, so what have we got here then?

          This is just essentially a gyrosope, but with a weight attached (not much, i guesstimate about 200g), By holding the device, and moving your hand in a certain way, you cause the gyro to spin. Because of the way gyro's work (see previous paragraph), the gyro will try to spin in a certain way. It is down to you and the muscles in your arm to try to fight the gyros natural path of spin, cause the fatigue in your arms!

          This device is highly addictive and fun, however I am not totally sold on its health benefits. Also the instruction you get given are a bit lame. On youtube there are loads of exercises you can do, which sort of makes it fun, its just a shame they do not give you them when you buy the thing.


          Another disadvantage is the sound, it is sort of a thrumming sound. its not very load, just means you cant say use it when watching TV or on the train, as people look at you....

          Another disadvantage is how fragile the device is. One drop could potentially break the thing, not a nice though when they can cost around a tenner each (for versions without the rev meter.


          The final disadvantage is comfort. Lately my hands have begun to ache when using the device. I think soon i will invest in some gloves to use with it.


          But overall, i do recommend the device. Its just a classic, and its good fun. If you get one with the counter, you can have "battles" with your friends to see who can achieve the highest revs. BUT im not sure i would market this as a fitness device, im not sure it actually does anything for your muscles.


          So in summary, as a piece of fun, its awesome. As a fitness device, i have my doubts

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          28.02.2012 10:18
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          A useful exercise tool that can be fiddly to get going.

          I bought a Powerball for two particularly bad reasons. Firstly, it was a special offer in Maplins one day, and secondly, I had absolutely no idea what it was and was curious. Having a terrible problem with impulse buying, how could I resist. I did not regret it however, as the Powerball has quickly become one of my favourite gadgets.

          The Powerball is a small handheld object, about the size of a tennis ball with the ends flattened. It is made of a strong transparent plastic case, containing a weighty gyroscope. Using a fiddly little cord, you set the gyroscope going and then move your wrist in nice smooth circles. As a result, the gyroscope spins faster and faster, not slowing until you do, and increasing resistance relative to the effort you put in.

          Sounds great, but what's the point? Well, it turns out that this is quite a comfortable way to exercise your wrist and forearms. Not only is the little gadget fascinating to watch, but it's capable of really tiring out your arms once you get it going. Whether you choose to keep things slow or to really give it some welly, the Powerball keeps offering an appropriate level of resistance. You can go for hours on this thing, if your arm can keep it up, just going in smooth gentle circles and you'll still get a decent workout.

          I'm not the best person to talk to on exercise equipment, if I'm honest. I don't use it, I don't buy it and I haven't stepped inside a gym in years, but I know what works for me and since I bought the Powerball a few months ago I've found that my forearms and wrists feel stronger and my grip feels a lot more confident. I can imagine this would be very useful for anyone that works with their hands.

          A few websites I read up on suggested that the Powerball is good as physical therapy for conditions such as arthritis. My Dad has arthritis in his hands and so we have tried the Powerball a couple of times, and the gentle, impact free type of exercises does seem to be helpful. However, as most models have to be activated by taking a fiddly little cord and winding up the gyroscope, then giving it a sharp pull, I find it hard to recommend for anyone with very severe arthritis, unless you've got someone happy to start it off for you every time. My Dad just couldn't get it going on his own before he lost patience with it. You can get an autostarter but these are sold separately and I haven't had chance to try one.

          Higher models come with some fancy features like LEDs, noisemakers and a counter that tracks your speed. This cheap model however does not include any of that, featuring only the basic functions needed operate it. While you won't miss the frilly extras like LEDs, after a few thousand spins you might yearn for that counter. Part of the device's benefit as an exercise tool is that it is quite compelling to watch and to hear just how must you can rev that gyroscope up.

          All in all, the Powerball is a remarkable little gadget. The gyroscope offers great resistance as you use it and it feels comfortable and satisfying to use. The results also seem to be quite positive and you get out directly relative to what you put in. The only problem is getting it going first, a fiddly process that is unavoidable due to the way the Ball operates, but is still a problem when you're talking about a device that is being pitched as an exercise and physical therapy device for people with weak, possibly damaged, hands and wrists.

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            07.12.2011 15:01
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            Builds up arm strength and is highly enjoyable

            I first picked up the powerball a few years back. I was at a friend's house and drawn towards the bright colours and fascinating gyroscopic creation left unused on his table. I picked it up and investigated like a new born ape discovering the world. I was perplexed and confused. My friend looked at me and said "I see you've found my POWERBALL" with great excitement. He couldn't praise it enough. He told me to rotate my wrist to get it going. I tried with great frustration to get the gyro rotating but with no avail. My friend gave a little demonstration and got the ball whizzing around and around with the noise of a small motor bike to accompany it. From that moment I was hooked!

            The next day I was straight to the shop to get my own. I quickly picked up the correct technique to get the gyro spinning, whizzing and whirling. I was ecstatic. A few weeks later of continuous use and enjoyment I noticed I was getting stronger in the upper body. Before then I did not realise it was an exercise ball. How can something so fun be good for you?

            Simply an amazing invention


            additional info:
            It weighs about a kilo. It tones all the way up the up. It does make you firmer and has certainly strengthened my grip. It is a little bit bigger than a tennis ball.

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              08.11.2011 12:31
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              Easy to use, difficult to master and highly addictive.

              This was another addition to my Powerball range that I have collected over the years, which takes the achievable speed range up to a new level, meaning even more exertion through the gyroscopic forces. Originally purchased from Amazon for £20, nowadays, the price has seen the price come down to a more reasonable £10.

              What is it? The Powerball itself is a sort of quirky little exercise gadget. It basically consists of a strong gyroscope that is installed into a ball like casing that is about the size of a tennis ball. Now for those of you who can remember back to the days of having a gyroscope spinning top that you used to spin up and balance on a string or a pencil tip, and the sort of forces you felt with that as you tried to turn it when it was spinning, that is what the effect of a gyroscope feels like - it resists you trying to turn it. Now if you use a heavier spinning top (as you find in this Powerball) and increase the speed (as with this Powerball), those gyroscopic forces will increase, and hence you create an exercise device that requires more force and resistance from yourself to control, and that is pretty much the essence of how a Powerball works.

              How do you use it? The idea is that you get the gyro within the Powerball spinning using the supplied sting. You then hold the device in your hand with your hand facing downwards and your arm straight down and then start to make small circular motions with your hand, as if you were stirring treacle in a large pot. As you do so, you will initially feel those gyroscopic forces resisting your motion. But as you keep slowly turning, you will hear the speed of the gyro increasing (the whirring sound will slowly increase), which will result in more resistance to your circular motion. The idea then is to get the gyro turning at a steady speed and to sustain that speed, whereupon you will begin to feel the effects on your wrist and forearms as you work those muscle groups. If you really want a work out, try to increase the speed of the gyro further, where the forces will increase again, and the makers detail that the forces exerted at speeds of around 15000 rpm are in the region of 40lbs of pressure on your muscles, with the gyro spinning at 250 revolutions per second. Hence, this device is called the Powerball 250Hz because it has been designed to reach those top speeds (some of the fastest in the Powerball range) to ensure that you get the maximum work out.

              The key is to get the gyro spinning smoothly, and that all comes down to technique - just remember stirring treacle in a bucket. If you hear any rattles or knocking, the gyro is slowing down and not rotating smoothly and this is where most people seem to initially fail and give up. They can't quite master the technique and just start to rattle to top around all over the place. But persevere with the technique and the device starts to become addictive as you try to increase the speed more and more. You'll never beat it because as the forces increase, it will become harder and harder to sustain the technique for longer durations, and hence you keep coming back to try again and again.

              What's it good for? Basically anyone who uses their forearms or wrists in sport, such as players of racquet sports, but equally anyone who relies on a strong grip (golfers, archers etc) would benefit from use of this Powerball because it will exercise and work those muscle groups. I do a fair amount of Power Kiting and initially found that the continual strain on my forearms from the constant pull of the kite was a problem. Hence I got into these Powerballs and started to strengthen my forearms and wrists and found that I could sustain the kite pulls a lot longer without strain. Equally it has also proved to be useful when I did have a strain in that it helped me build the strength back up in that muscle and so aided recovery. A further offshoot of using this I found was that it seemed to improve my overall gripping ability. My wife commented that I now seemed to be able to open stubborn jar tops with ease (High level endorsement from Home Command?).

              In summary, class it as a game, a gadget or a serious piece of exercise kit, the Powerball has a serious use, particularly this 250Hz version which takes the whole gyroscopic force issue to a new level. Easy to use, but difficult to master, it becomes addictive as you continually try to beat it, and hence, is a device that you will use again and again. Hence, a 5* recommendation.

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                30.10.2011 13:09

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                Great product would recommend to anyone!

                I have had the powerball for 3 years now and can confirm that it is a useful product. It works out your forearm and wrist the most which is very useful. Depending on how you hold it, you can work out your biceps, chest and triceps with a ball similar to the size of a tennis ball, magical right?

                Depending on how fast you spin the powerball you can tone or build muscle which is very convenient if like me you are looking for a fun way of toning muscles on the weekend after a long week of going to the gym. My forearm is ripped now thanks to the powerball and it also looks leaner.

                The noise that the powerball makes can be annoying after a few uses but if you can get past that then this is a magical product that I would recommend to men and women of all ages.

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                29.10.2011 20:17
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                Wrist training aid

                I think it's fair to say that I've got a bit of a Powerball collection going on... four at the last count, although I probably don't use them as much as I perhaps should. If you're new to the noble art of Powerballing, the Powerball is simply a training aid which can help strengthen the wrists and tone up the muscles in the upper body - it's great for those actively involved in racquet sports, golf, and climbing - plus, there are no batteries required. At around the size of a tennis ball, the device is grasped in the hand and continuously rotated around, thus activating the internal gyroscopic motor. The faster you spin the wrist, the faster the gyroscope spins, making the Powerball quite difficult to keep hold of.

                The Powerball I am looking at today is the 250hz version - the most basic model available which currently retails at Amazon for £9. But how does this version differ from the other Powerball models? The only real difference is the fact that the 250hz doesn't have an LCD screen to help keep track of your performance. The novelty of having a screen is certainly good for Powerball newbies, but to be honest, it's not something which I now use on my Powerballs with screens, so not having one on this model doesn't bother me. Plus, the lack of a screen gives this Powerball a slimmer profile at the top, and because of this I actually find this version easier to hold.

                It should be pointed out that using the Powerball is quite a difficult technique to master - just getting the thing started when you use a Powerball for the first time is a challenge in itself. Firstly you need to insert the little red cord (which is provided) into the Powerball's central rotating ring, and smoothly (but firmly) pull it away from the device. This should hopefully start the gyroscope spinning - and now it's down to you to keep it spinning via a smooth rotating wrist motion. As you become more advanced with the Powerball, you'll find that the cord isn't needed to start it up - a quick flick with the finger will suffice.

                Available in amber or blue, the 250hz Powerball is made from a transparent plastic with a rubber grip section around the outside. Although the outer case is quite tough, Powerballs can be damaged fairly easily; dropping them whilst spinning, or even shaking them whilst spinning can often spell the end for your plastic rotating friend.

                I have personally found that the Powerball has helped strengthen my wrists immeasurably, which has really assisted with my squash game. I also find the process of using the Powerball (for short periods at least) to be quite good fun, so it doesn't feel like too much of a chore. Powerballs are also very good therapy for those suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome and RSI - and I would certainly recommend the 250hz version due to its wrist strengthening benefits and good value for money.

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                  27.10.2011 11:11
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                  A great starter powerball, but you really should go for the Pro!

                  Many of you will be wondering what a "Powerball" actually is, and until a few months ago, I wouldn't have been able to help you. I now own 2 of the strange things, and use them regularly, so here goes...

                  The Powerball 250 Hz is the basic model. I also now own a White Pro Signature model, which I reviewed a couple of weeks after I bought it, but having owned both for several months now, I feel I am much better placed to tell you about them.

                  I bought these on a whim, having heard that they were a good aid for sportsmen and women, and could be used for a 'non-impact' workout, or for therapy for sports-related injuries of the wrist and arm, as well as just being fun. First I'll let you know what they are...

                  <<< About "Powerballs" >>>

                  A powerball is spherical and around the size of a tennis ball, but heavier. It contains a weighted gyroscope, and the idea is that you start the gyroscope moving and maintain the movement via controlled and rhythmic motions of your hand. Following this, you can gradually make smaller, faster movements which increase the rotation speed of the gyroscope, thus generating a greater internal force - it becomes a challenge to maintain higher speeds, and the muscles and tendons in your hand and arm work hard to keep up the momentum. That's the concept anyway...

                  <<< Frustration >>>

                  At first, I really could not get the powerball to 'work'. Holding the powerball firmly in your hand, you start the internal gyroscope by feeding a cord through the ball, winding it up around the internal mechanism, and then giving a sharp tug on the cord to begin the spinning. This feels like a small rumbling in the palm of your hand, and it's now up to you to manually maintain the momentum. The best way to describe the motion is to keep your arm relatively still but to roll your wrist in wide, slow circles, but I am certain you will not get it right immediately.

                  Many times the gyroscope clattered loudly against the inside of the casing and sputtered to a halt, or I thought I had the rhythm but the ball became slower and slower before stopping. You will need patience and persistence, and the help of a few youtube technique videos to get started, but when you do get it right, it's a very strange sensation.

                  <<< What's the Big Deal? >>>

                  Maintaining the motion in the first step, and then you have to speed it up in order to push the powerball further. The powerball really can generate substantial forces, and it won't be long before you increase the speed so much that it feels as if the ball will escape from your hand! It's for this exact reason that some models come wit ha wrist strap to prevent you from dropping the powerball and damaging it, or something else nearby!

                  The principle is very clever; the stronger the muscles in your wrist and arm, the greater the momentum you will be able to achieve, and the greater the momentum, the more strength it takes to keep the ball under control. The way your muscles are stimulated isn't immediately obvious, but soon your arm will begin to ache and you will really feel as if you are working hard.

                  <<< Does it Work? >>>

                  Powerballs were initially developed as a training aid, designed to work various muscles in your hand, wrist, arm, and shoulders. They are also praised for their role in rehabilitation from carpal tunnel syndrome and similar conditions. Thirdly, for those who get the hang of them, it's also a bit of fun!

                  I wanted to use the powerballs to aid a regular workout, to increase my grip strength, and to help my wrist strength and technique in games like squash and badminton. I've been using them most days for a few months now and found the following:

                  - The powerball has helped me tone my arms, and especially my forearms in a noticeable way. To achieve this it's necessary to always push for higher speeds and 'embrace the ache'.
                  - The powerball has not turned me into the hulk; it can help with toning and conditioning, but will not result in you building masses of muscle.
                  - My forearms and wrists feel much stronger and sturdier when playing racquet sports, letting me hit the ball harder with a better action.

                  <<< The 250 Hz Model >>>

                  The major difference between this and the Pro model, and definitely the major shortcoming, is the lack of an LCD display. On the Pro model, the display can tell you the number of revolutions, and the highest speed achieved, which is incredibly useful for making sure you push harder and achieve better results each time. It's also fun to use this as a contest wit friends, and see who can achieve the highest speeds!

                  <<< A load of balls, but which one to buy? >>>

                  Once you get beyond the initial novelty value, some people will embrace the powerball, and others will quickly forget and fall out of love with it. For me, it is a great challenge, and a fun aid to a regular workout, which I have definitely felt benefits from.

                  Personally I would recommend the Pro model with the LCD display as opposed to this 250Hz regular model, but this is a good starting point to test whether you really will take to it...

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                    22.07.2011 12:34
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                    Not useful for serious athlete, fun if you want a gimmick to show your friends!

                    The powerball 250Hz is a hand gyroscope that is fun to use to develop grip strength. The product is mainly advertised for tennis, badminton and squash players, however I bought the product to see if it could aid my grip in powerlifting. I bought an amber coloured form of the 250Hz version which retailed on Amazon UK for £12 a while back, but currently it's on offer on Amazon for just £9.49.

                    Appearance
                    The ball is roughly the size of a cricket ball, made from plastic and weighs around 50 grams. The powerball comes in two colour schemes, blue and green, where the outer casing of the model is light transparent blue, with a green inner ball inside the product and some black banding on the outer casing for logos etcetera. The other form which I actually own, is an orange amber colour and the inner ball is a greeny/yellow colour. There are three logos on both devices, one in the centre of the ball, one on the top of the product and one on the bottom of the powerball. Overall I would say the powerball looks pretty attractive and modern, the ball is a good size to fit in an adult hand and the ball itself is very light.

                    Durability
                    The product was quite durable. The plastic was of a good quality and the inner ball continued to rotate and work well after 6 months of light to moderate recreational usage. I have dropped the powerball a few times onto a wooden flooring and the casing remains strong and uncracked. That said, it is only made from plastic, so if you dropped into onto concrete hard, I would imagine it would get cracked. Another durability issue was that the rip cord/lace attachment that comes with the powerball was starting to fray and wear away from the product, I could not see it lasting anymore than a year or two at best, even with light usage.

                    Usability
                    You essentially rotate the ball in your hand, which in turn rotates in the green inner ball inside the powerball around, you can use the rip cord to start gaining momentum. This is a bit tricky to get the hold of and rotate to a high speed, it did not come naturally to me. The powerball 250Hz is the strongest and fastest powerball that is currently made but even with this, I found it done little to improve my grip strength. The product when you rotate it around in your hand also lights up in bright colours which look quite good in the dark, except lights or no lights, I didn't want fancy extras, I just wanted it to develop my grip strength. I think this product may be best suited for people who never play sport, lift weights or train professionally, even under high momentum and usage for months, my grip strength did not really improve at all with this product. I think most athletes and serious sporting people would benefit more from the captains of crush strength grippers, although the captains of crush hand grippers are difficult to close, my grip strength for the deadlift has went through the roof so to speak and was much more effective than my 250Hz powerball ever was. Overall, I would say the 250Hz powerball done little to improve my strength and time would have better been spent on using my captains of crush hand grippers.

                    Pricing
                    You can't really fault the price of the product at around £9-£12 online if you buy from Amazon. It certainly won't break the bank but I think unless your only a beginner in fitness or play a low impact sport like golf, only they will see any real benefit from the product. You can buy the captains of crush strength grippers on eBay and powerlifting shops for around £20 to £25. The captains of crush are solidly built, made from a metal construction and will last a lifetime. They are difficult to close, but will develop solid, real world grip strength, it is indeed tested and used by world class powerlifters and professional strongmen. Overall, it is good value for money at under £10 currently on Amazon, but I don't find it works at all on serious athletes and would instead advise the Captains of Crush hand grippers to most people.

                    Drawbacks
                    As stated I did not find the product worked for me in improving grip strength, I think the rotating motion that you need to create the momentum to use the product did not come natural and was tricky to get to use until you reach the high speeds. I think the captains of crush grippers and not some cheap low resistance Argos hand gripper develops real world strength, not the poweball. The rip cord/lace attachment that you can use to gather momentum was beginning to wear away and would only last maybe a year until it was useless. The plastic was quite durable, but I think it should be made from rubber or bits of metal which would be stronger should you drop your powerball on concrete. My poweball on amazon was supposed to come with a digital counter, so you know what speed you get to on rotating it, but my powerball did not have this counter so It was dissapointing.

                    Conclusion
                    To conclude, I think the powerball 250Hz was a pretty poor purchase. The overall appearance, colour schemes and the lights that come on when you rotate it were good but I did not care how the product looked, only if it worked. The powerball did not work, and I kind of think of it as a gimmick if your a serious athlete or sports person. Certainly if your a boxer, kickboxer, powerlifter or strongman, there's little point in purchasing it, the Captains of Crush strength grippers produced by IronMind in the USA are readily available on eBay and online powerlifting shops online, they are used by Strongmen who you will have seen on world's strongest man and are proven to be an international measure of grip strength. You can buy them for £20 to £25 and they will last far longer than the Powerball 250Hz's rip cord ever will!. Bottom line, if your after a valid grip strength training device look elsewhere, if your after a gimmick with flashing lights and don't plan on training seriously or play sport at all, then the powerball 250Hz could be a fun investment.

                    © Revo9 (2011)
                    *Note, I am both a member of Ciao and Dooyoo.co.uk under the same username of Revo9*

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                    • More +
                      21.07.2011 10:39
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                      Powerball 250 Hz

                      The first time I saw the Powerball I thought it was the most stupidest thing I had ever seen. I saw a video on Youtube of Japanese people competing with each other and did not see the point of it. But after I heard from a friend of mine who was always using it, I changed my opinion about it and learned that the Powerball can actually be very powerful.

                      The Powerball is a device what astronauts used in space to be able to workout and keep their muscles in shape, since you can't workout in space. They learned that it's not only good for people in space but also for people down on earth. Apparently it does wonders for rehabilitation and toning of the muscles but also reducing symptoms of arthritis and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Now I'm not a doctor or an expert and not going to say that the Powerball actually helps with this. I can only tell you my own experiences.

                      I started using the Powerball because I was getting more and more signs of having Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. My arms and shoulder were becoming painful and sometimes I had this dead acing feeling of my arms. They just felt really restless and sometimes especially when I woke up. I also started to feel more pain while behind the computer and just felt like I couldn't type as much anymore. Since a friend of mine had experienced the same symptoms, I knew which direction I could be heading if I didn't start to change my habits. Now I'm not going to tell the whole long story but in short I bought the Powerball as it seemed to help with these symptoms.

                      I ordered this Powerball from Amazon and it came in small box which contained information about the Powerball itself. Inside you have the actual Powerbal and two strings. They looked pretty much like shoe laces. What you need to do with these laces is that you put them into the Powerball, wrap them around the indent and pull hard and the ball inside the Powerball stars to spin. This is the point were you need to hold the Powerball correctly and do the correct movements in order to keep the ball spinning.

                      In the beginning I thought it was really difficult and for the first four times it simply didn't work and almost gave up. But since them I'm loving it! I'm doing it once a day for 15 minutes for both arms and it's actually 'fun' to do. You can easily do it while watching television! What I like about it is that you control the speed of the spinning. So if you want to go slow then you just make a slower movement. Like a normal workout you don't want to overdo it but after a week I could tell I could handle already a faster speed!

                      Now the Powerball is meant to give you more strength in your arms and relieve symptoms. My experience is that it helps. You don't suddenly become very strong but I had after a week of using it I noticed that not only I could handle a faster spinning speed but also that my symptoms were becoming less. Especially the restless feeling in the arms disappeared completely after (I think about) two weeks of using it and never came back. Also during typing behind the computer I noticed a big difference and isn't painful anymore to type for long time. Now I did change my habits as taking more breaks when I'm behind the computer and I changed the way I sit behind the computer. So I do think it's more a combination of both but for me it actually works and I do see improvement. You can buy this little Powerbal for around 10 pounds, so really good to try it out once.

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                        17.07.2011 01:01
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                        for the price charged, a good investment

                        I first bought the Powerball to try and get stronger without having to go to the gym. The Powerball helped me achieve this, as well as bringing a sense of fun and competition to exercise. The Powerball is a relatively small sphere, with a gyroscope in the center. It comes with a starting cord, which is used to get the device spinning and then this gyroscope is accelerated by rotating the wrist at an exponential rate. As the Powerball spins, faster and faster it makes a whiring sound, similar to that of a jet engine(obviously not as loud). The Powerball is good at exercising muscles in the arm/wrist region and you will gradually be able to reach faster speeds as you get used to it. It also recommend for rehabilitation from sporting injuries. One negative with the Powerball is it takes a while to learn how to get it spinning. Also the centre gets hot at very high speeds and this can lead to blisters on your hand. Despite this, an excellent, innovative and fun product.

                        * i also published this review on ciao under the username pie12345

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