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Kenwood FP120 Compact Food Processor

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£38.99 Best Offer by: tesco.com See more offers
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    8 Reviews
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      09.03.2014 10:00
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      Nice machine

      There are a lot of things I miss about living at room, getting washing done, getting food on the table and all the gadgets that my parents had! One of these being this food processor. If you were ever cooking or making things such as soups, this processor was just so easy to use and did the job.

      It doesn't look amazing, I'll admit, it actually looks very unremarkable. It has a white base with some buttons on for various features and the actual plastic container which is standard. There are a lot more processors out there which can look a lot more stylish in your kitchen.

      Now for the actual job it does. The Kenwood food processor is great if you're making soups, need to quickly mash food together without actually cutting it yourself. It only has a 400 Watt power outage which isn't the best you can get. It can be a little weak if you place a lot of different and difficult food in, however for most it is excellent and gets the job done within a few minutes. It has a one speed plus option to make things go a little faster, however for the energy it must take, there isn't much difference.

      The 1.4L capacity bowl is enough for 800g of cake or 800ml of liquids which isn't too bad. The simplicity of the machine is one of my positives for it though. In one simple step you just put the food in, then connect the bowl to the machine and press the go button. Now I found connecting the bowl absolutely fine but I know my mom struggled with connecting it, it always took her a few goes.

      Overall I would say that the Kenwood Food Processor is a nice purchase for anyone who likes to make different things such as soups. You can buy one for £35 at amazon.

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        05.11.2013 16:34
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        A good processor - but there are better.

        Last year as a wedding gift, my wife and I were lucky enough to receive this model as a gift, and we have certainly given it the works since.

        Why the FP120? Quite simply we put it on our registry as an inexpensive food processor. It is cheap, and a fairly user friendly entry level into food processing. If you're just moving out for the first time and funds are limited, or are not sure if food processors are for you, I can safely say that this is an inexpensive means of trying them out.

        Processing/Quality:
        Generally speaking we have used this for a lot of prep work since receiving it, and it hasn't let us down. It is very functional, and has saved us an awful lot of time in the kitchen! I can attest to the quality as being very high, and it has always delivered good results.

        With that said - even after a cursory glance it's clear that there are other models on the market now that can do exactly what this model can, and an awful lot more to boot. That isn't to nay-say the quality that this product produces... more it's range of functions.

        Reliability:
        So far as reliability goes there's nothing negative to say so far. The product has been user friendly and produced solid results throughout it's use. One annoying caveat however is when slicing or dicing the end piece of fruit or veg tends to get stuck at the top of the machine, rather than evenly diced throughout. Annoying, but it's hardly tarnishing an otherwise decent product.

        Ease of use:
        It has been pretty easy to use so far I have to say. Some of it's attachments would cause bafflement without an instruction guide as their use may not appear clear initially. Once you get into the swing of things with it, it tends to be fairly intuitive.

        Cleaning/Maintenance:
        Thankfully it's all dishwasher friendly. With the blades (particularly on the slicer/dicer attachments) having sharp grooves I would not relish having to clean them by hand. I tend to use it every day, so being able to toss it into the dishwasher is a definite plus. Where you not to use a dishwasher - you may want to question just how much time you'd be saving using it, with the resultant clean-up.

        Noise:
        Well.. it's loud. Thankfully that's not too much of an issue for myself or my wife, but for those whom it would cause problems for it's worth noting. I own a blender too and I have to say that the FP120 is quieter than that, but other food processors can certainly reduce this noise.

        Overall thoughts:
        I would definitely recommend if you can pick it up cheap. Overall I would have to encourage you to assess just what you want to use it for, and just how much time are you looking to save, and how much that is worth to you. As a cheap entry level food processor I give it two thumbs up! For a kitchen guru? Perhaps a better model is in order.

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        06.11.2012 16:08
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        This is cheap but a waste of money.

        My mum became very ill last summer. She wasn't able to swallow solid food. I devised thin soups, smoothies and apple sauce. If the fluids had any lumps in my mum couldn't swallow it down. It was vital that everything was a thin, gentle, liquid. This wasn't working with a hand whisk.

        I had to buy a food processor and fast.

        Size and Price Bracket:

        I found this Kenwood Compact processor, weighing in at 3.2kg, on Amazon. I admit the reviews weren't all as I would have liked them to be but I was swung by the lowest market price and the compact size. All the other mini food processors cost much too much and this appeared to do what I wanted it to do. I didn't feel I had any other choice as there was no competitor to price match with. If it worked, it might not be too drastic to say, it could have been a life saver.

        After placing my order with Amazon I waited anxiously for its arrival. Thankfully, it came in good time. It was safely packed in a box, within a box. The huge size made me think I'd been sent the wrong product or the compact description was a misnomer. After unpacking It was a relief to find it was indeed compact. Amazon, I feel, are very inconsiderate of the environment when it comes to packaging.

        Prestigious name:

        The big, black and bold type on the box reminded me this was a Kenwood. I felt reassured. This make is meant to be the best. Didn't all those cooks and chefs of the past dream of saving up for the crème de le crème? This would mean that we had something of good quality in this little machine or so I thought.

        Conisists of:

        A plastic pusher and a plastic 1.4 l bowl (with a 0.8 litre working capacity)
        Power unit

        Spatula and instructions. The tools are a mix of plastic and steel.

        Accessories:

        The accessories include a stainless steel chopping blade, full volume whisk, shredder plate, slicer plate and maxi blend canopy. These are easy to change over. Just pull out the old piece and slot in the new.
        There is a pusher and a 1.4 l bowl (with a 0.8 litre working capacity) on the power unit with a separate knife blade, slicing plate, plate carrier, whisk, maxi blend canopy and spatula. The tools are a made of a mix of plastic and steel.

        There is also an instruction booklet but this is not good for those who can't read small to medium print.

        However, the machine was very easy to set up and no technical ability is needed to insert the attachment. It stands on rubberised feet which are already attached to the machine.

        Results:

        The Kenwood Compact FP120 has 400 watts. What this turns out to mean in non-technical terms is that this is slow. In fact, I found it so slow that I find it quicker to chop up the vegetables by hand. Mind you if the processor succeeded in chopping fruit and veg or beating things into a pulp I might not complain too much about the speed. It's outrageous that even when I have made food smaller, by hand, the machine still doesn't cut through it, despite appearing to be sharp, and I'm left with not just lumps but big pieces un-chopped even after making the blade whirr around for ages. One has to lift the lid and remove the untouched parts that have been missed altogether by the blade. Nor can the quantity be very high in the bowl or it will spill over the top.

        The safety lock feature does work on this. Unless, the bowl and lid have clicked properly into position, it will not switch on.


        I use this Kenwood so as not to waste the money spent on it. I still stubbornly do, from time to time, hoping it will be fine, but when I dare to use it the burning smell is immediate.

        Mum brought out an excellent Moulinex which doesn't smell of burning, is much more compact, in a small bowl with the power lid on top in one cylinder-like form, unlike this, which is a strange slightly curved and white large design and has a smaller capacity. Sadly the wonderful Moulinex is no longer manufactured.

        I wish I hadn't bought the Kenwood FP120 and that I had returned it but I was too caught up with other important matters to bother do so. From previous experience with Amazon, I am almost certain they would have refunded my money had I contacted them.

        I don't understand why this has good reviews. My experiences, and I have reluctantly used it plenty of times now, are completely negative. Maybe there are a few rogue machines and I have since discovered others have complained of the burning smell so was I unlucky or is there a problem coming to light? My advice can only be against buying this particular Kenwood. I hope there are better compact machines on the market. Let me know if you find it! This machine did not save time or money and leaves me with concerns.

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          25.09.2011 21:12
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          Reasonable but I wouldn't buy one tomorrow

          I have had the Kenwood Compact FP120 for a few years now. Here is my review based on it's initial purchase and the time I have owned it.

          -- Why Kenwood? --

          When I was younger my mum had a Kenwood Chef, and I was always told to be careful with it because it was a very expensive and very good (ie, the best) mixer on the market. So I have always (and I am sure most people do the same) equate the Kenwood name with good quality mixers.

          -- Why the FP120? --

          I feel this was the right choice for myself and my husband as we lived in an apartment with limited counter top space, and the capacity (0.8L liquid and 0.8kg dry) was just right for us, whilst the mixer itself didn't take up too much space. It also has a loop to store the cord - which means it looks neat and tidy if, like us, you don't use it every day or leave it plugged in.

          -- Price and Availability --

          The FP120 is a few years old now and newer models have followed since, which are a higher wattage (the FP120 is 400w, which is 400w less than my hand held stick blender!). I paid around £35 for ours, but should you wish to buy it, you can do so for around £25, there are plenty of new models available on eBay and independent electrical retailers.

          -- Looks --

          The Kenwood FP120 is styled in white plastic, and does (to me, I've moved on to stainless steel, haha) look slightly dated, but it does look very clean, fairly minimalist and of a high quality. The chopping bowl and tube are in a clear plastic.

          -- Use --

          The Kenwood is very easy to use - simply select which cutting plate you wish to use (the Kenwood slices and shreds, it also has a citrus juicer attachment) and then you're away. You can set the mixer to mix or pulse, sadly there are no other options, though as this is a fairly basic model in the Kenwood family, this was expected. It's fine for my uses - chopping onion and carrot, mixing dry cake mix, and so on. Quite basic. It does come with a full instructional manual but it's so easy to use, you don't need to keep it out in the kitchen!

          I'd suspect the more advanced chef might find this slightly limiting. It also has no kneading arm for dough, which would have been useful, but overall as a quality basic mixer, it fits my needs.

          -- Cleaning --

          The components are dishwasher safe which is a big plus and the cutting plates have never tarnished or rusted, though the clear body of the mixer has scuffed over time. The white plastic body and power cord of the unit, which can get splashed with food, can both be wiped down with a damp cloth / cleaning wipe. Neither the unit nor plug have yellowed with age (I have had this mixer a good four years).

          -- Overall --

          I think the Kenwood FP120 was a great, fairly low cost basic mixer back when I bought it, but it's main limitation now is the speed. You can get mixers twice and three times the wattage which can crush ice, knead dough, and even crush nuts for the same and in some cases, less expense.

          I am, however, reviewing this mixer and I can't really bring it down more than one star for the fact that it hasn't dated too well. For it's time it was a good mixer though I must say, now I have an 800w hand mixer which does more than the Kenwood FP120, I won't be replacing the Kenwood with another large appliance mixer if and when it gives up the ghost - I'll stick to the hand blender.

          So whilst I'll award the Kenwood four stars out of five, for it's overall performance, I can't actually recommend it as a purchase now - as you can either buy a mixer which will perform much the same for around £20 these days, or you can spend say £30 - £35 and get a decent mid range mixer which will do much more, faster. Or, you can do as I plan to and save space with a multi purpose stick tool.

          So - whilst the Kenwood FP120 has always been a reliable machine, and never let me down, I don't recommend you buy one now. Appliances rarely age badly (I'm talking white goods here, not entertainment technology) but it's my belief this product hasn't aged too well when you consider my Mum still uses her hand held balloon whisk of 30+ years running - and it's better than modern day ones (in my opinion!).

          A mixed review, which I hope you'll understand - but the Kenwood Chef is still superb!

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            11.06.2011 21:20

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            overall a good mixer, slicer, grater and lasts well

            Definately the appliance for making soup! Just be careful to leave an extra cm or 2 below the line so it doesn't overflow!
            Really easy to clean too so even if you do accidently over fill the mixer you aren't going to be spending ages cleaning up afterwards!
            The different attachments are really good too - I just don't slice by hand anymore because the slicer does a much better job!
            Very quick at mixing and blending, easy to load and unlock, no messing around with buttons and leavers trying to detach the bowl.
            Good value for money and lasts really well (mine is still on the go for over a year and works just the same as when I brought it from the shop!)
            Couldn't be simpler to use and fits nicely away in the cupboard afterwards.
            The sticky pads on the bottom of the blender also stop the machine moving off the work surface when you're not looking!

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            11.11.2010 11:26
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            We bought one of these Kenwood Food Processors as I was having trouble with my arms and was finding it hard to hold things like carrots and onions with one hand and be able to chop them up with the other without slipping and hurting my self.


            The processor had a jug like container on one side that you attach to the rest of it by sliding it on and twisting so that it is in the right position. If you do not have it in the right position it wont work.


            There are a number of attachments that come with the processor, chopping blade, slicer plate, shredder plate, and whisk. The one I use the most is the chopping blade. You have this lid on the top that has a long chimney like thing sticking out of the top and you also have another plastic object that fits insde this chimney. You peel the veg and make sure it is in pieces that fit into the chimney and then you place the other object down on top to push the food down so that you dont get your fingers near the cutters and just press the button and it chops it all up in no time.


            The shredder is good for grating up cheese as again I find this hard to do manually.


            The cutters are easy enough to fit on and take off again and the jug is easy to wash up after so you can get all the little bits of food out easily.


            As for sizes, the jug will contain 1.4L of food so you fit quite a bit in there at a time. The motor runs at 400w so makes it quite capable of chopping harder foods as well as soft foods. The whole thing weighs about 2kg so just a night weight as if it was any lighter it might move about when trying to use it.


            You can buy one of these food processors in Argos for £29.99 so a very respectable price. I would recommend it and give it 5 stars.

            Copied to Ciao under username Harveydog52

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            30.04.2010 18:14

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            Great little blender

            The saying goes 'you get what you pay for' with this great little processor you get that and so much more.
            Not only do you get the processor blades but the Kenwood FP120 comes with a snap in slicers and grater (which are very easy to interchange), a maxiblend canope, a whisk tool and a spatula.
            It comes with an easy to follow instruction booklet, which also contains some interesting recipes to get you started.
            The processor itself blends to a nice smooth consistency, it doesn't miss bits. Having the blend and pulse settings is a nice touch on such an inexpensive model. It has rubber feet that ensure it doesn't move whilst you are blending.
            It isn't the biggest food processor, so it takes up next to no counter space but for a couple or a small family it is the perfect size.
            For a little less than £30 I would recommend this product to anyone looking for an easy to use processor.

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            28.09.2009 00:02
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            A replacement for the Kenwood FP 110 but not as effective or as compact.

            Never ever give away any kitchen appliances to friends unless you know they are going to treat them with respect! That's my latest moto because when I lent out my little food processor out for a cooking charity event what I got back was something that was short of a couple of attachments and a crack on the lid that Kenwood wanted to charge £22-95 for! Whilst I may have hurt my friends' feelings, she could only supply me with a new food processor and this is how the Kenwood FP120 has come to pass. This is a long review!


            Dressed in a mix of white and grey, the Kenwood FP 120 is a direct replacement for the long standing Kenwood FP 110 series, both as a Cookworks version from Argos and of course under Kenwood's long standing model number. An additional model, the FP 126 is the same but decked out in plastic chrome and priced at £30 to £35 just for that luxury. As a replacement to my own FP 110 I was expecting huge strides even though the look is slightly different, my old FP110 felt smaller and this newer design seems to be bulkier than before; clearly Kenwood may be copying other rivals but for compact kitchens, this food processor does take up a little more room than the last Kenwood I had but it still retains the same 0.8 litre liquid/0.8 litre dry food capacity. Smoothened over in grey and white contrasts, the FP 120 is the base starter of the food processor range in Kenwood's family for food prep and at £27-99 (Argos) it seems that the price has also risen since the last model only cost £24-95.


            However for the £30 it cost my friend to renew and sustain our friendship the Kenwood FP 120 has a few surprises in store. For a start due to a new diet I'm on I need a food slicer/shredder daily and my Kenwood has a lot to do even though for me, it's only going to be used by me and me only. Of course it will also be put through more stages when guests call round for dinner! As a replacement to the FP 110 both by its market presence and for my own machine I wasn't surprised to find it has the same "budget" attachments as my old machine and as a result I've managed to swap around the parts I use and the ones that can't be used; not much in terms of the parts you get have seen much change to be honest and still comes with a slicer plate, a shredder plate, the obligatory juice squeezer that Kenwood seem to pass off with every food processor they make (and it's still a hand work out having to hold an orange whilst the spindle flies around removing the zest and pith into a plastic sieve before it hits the open bowl at the bottom) a stainless steel knife blade, a milk whisk attachment and lastly, the piece de resistance a maxi canopy disc that fits over the knife/chopping blade that acts as a double liquid capacity enabled tool which doubles the volume of liquids up to 1.4 litres.


            Certainly for a bigger machine over the "Delia," inspired Kenwood mini-chopper, the FP 120 remains a good idea for those looking for extra food prep tasks over the basic skill of what the mini chopper offers and despite its smaller dry food capacity, the FP 120 looks like it could well be a winner for people looking for a machine that can do a bit more than just chop.


            For a start, the build quality of the FP 120 is slightly disappointing; a fact and a surprise that I found when taking the machine out of the box and feeling the actual design in my hands. Slightly taller and heavier than what I had before, Kenwood have put on block decals and labelling with little thought here, even though the colour scheme is nothing to shout about. Over my old FP 110 the plastic on the FP 120 doesn't feel better; the tactile finishes may feel grainy and soft although this doesn't do injustice to the actual performance, some edges feel like they could break off and I find keeping the top of the Kenwood FP 120 that little bit more difficult to keep clean because of the grey surface. It also suffers from wobbling slightly which could be put down to its wider shape. The main power control only has one fixed speed on offer and then turned anti-clockwise you'll get a Pulse function. This couldn't emulate the single control knob from Kenwood's Chef anymore if it tried. For the most part I prefer a Pulse action anyway and whilst it is welcomed, the large control knob can be difficult to grasp because it doesn't have much of a grippy texture surrounding its circumference despite a few notches set into its design. It also has a weak action to it and doesn't feel particularly well made, almost as if it's a hollow shell. You can guess what I'm going to say next; my old Kenwood had acres more quality than this matt coloured food processor and it wasn't half as difficult to keep clean after food use. Kenwood however have retained the handy cord storage wrap at the rear of the food processor and you get 0.5 metres of power cord and fitted plug to get you started.


            The good news is that this food processor has 100 watts more power than my last and at 400 watts it is of good benefit to have this if, say, chopping up difficult vegetables like carrots or potatoes. The slicer and shredder discs however are much better designed now; Kenwood have finally got rid of the little red catch that had to be fixed at the bottom of the slicer/shredder holding plate on the FP 101 and 110 series that annoyed most owners if it ever got lost, resulting in poorer quality cut food prep, burnt out motors and warped discs. Here you simply align the slicer carrier and drop it in before picking the plate you need and pushing it down into the carrier before locking down. When you're finished all you do is push the slicer/shredder plates out to remove.


            When it comes to slicing and shredding then, the Kenwood FP 120 has no worries; it does this task very well, with each particle of food cut precisely and evenly although it suffers at the end piece of food often getting stuck at the top, a problem that seems to happen with most food processors especially with cheese. The knife/chopping blade is also generally excellent at whipping up liquids and with the use of the additional canopy disc jammed on before putting the lid on to twist and lock to double liquids, the knife blade is an excellent design generally and has an easy to pick up top on it when all is finished. Despite all the user manual advice however I found that whilst the knife blade could deal with onions, I had to keep a watchful eye so that they didn't become blurred up into a paste - whilst the power is there, one lower speed would be welcomed here and certainly it is not the kind of food processor you can rely on and walk away from despite the noise because of the ferocious speed on offer, unless you are a very experienced cook. Even then I would be careful here!


            Where it struggles is with the whisking disc which can't whisk anything other than milk and why Kenwood persist in putting such as a limited tool in as a free tool has often puzzled me; if Kenwood want to remain as a team player in the market for food processors, they really need to rethink some of the tools they give away. Even as it whisks the milk it makes a fine mess when taking the tool out! Full marks though for a clearer gradient in litres/millilitres scale on the bottom bowl and has an easier fitting lid with a food pusher that doesn't rattled about in its holder. Again like my old food processor it only takes milliseconds to drop the bowl on and twist in to lock.


            Sadly although the power is there, noise absorption and vibration seems to have been left out when it came to signing off the final design! The FP 120 is a noisy food processor only somewhat alleviated in the noise stakes if you keep your hand on the control knob in Pulse mode than relying on the fixed speed on the other side of the dial. I find the noise is really trying and as a result use the Kenwood as little as possible or just take that little bit longer using the preferred Pulse function. The FP 120 seems to uprate the power instantly from Pulse to the fixed speed resulting in a lot of whine, grating food and all the while despite the four suction feet on the base, makes the unit wobble a fair bit. All that in my mind doesn't put the Kenwood FP 120 in a terribly good light although granted some buyers may put up with this.


            For accessibility at least the bowl is slightly wider than before, lending a slight soup bowl shape to it. When scooping out food prep I find that the bowl's wider design makes it easier to scoop food out, not just with Kenwood's excellent flexible spatula (of which you get one free with the food processor) but with normal wooden spoons and other cutlery there's no longer a feeling of implements getting trapped to spoon food out. Once the bowl is taken off wiping down the actual machine is also easier than my old Kenwood which is at least a plus point due its' newer softer design here. The lid however takes some time getting used to as it won't always lock and can be pernickety to fit on if you are in a hurry. That means the Kenwood won't start unless the lid locks in properly.


            All the parts bar the milk whisk disk (since it is completely made of thin plastic) are dishwasher safe proof but of disappointment according to the user manual on a top rack only and with a short programme selected! It is just as well the bowl is compact as I had worries it wouldn't fit. The stainless steel chopper knife blades are not serrated either - another downside to Kenwood's cost cutting exercise here. The user manual is basic too only giving a few hints like cutting up food to reasonable sizes and not too small so that the food processor can at least manage what you put into it. No shi* Sherlock there!



            In all intents and purposes Kenwood have done very little to improve on what has gone on before and the new FP 120 isn't much of an improvement to my old cherished FP 110. The fact that it is based on an old drive belt design means there could be problems long term against more expensive "induction" direct drive motors that offer extra strength and less noise. Over the mini chopper if you must stick to brand loyalty, the Kenwood FP 120 will slice and shred to your hearts content and it will give excellent results for a small family not used to baking. But it could have been so much better, Kenwood! Thanks for reading. ©Nar2 2009

            http://www.kenwoodworld.com/uk/

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          • Product Details

            Power: 400 watts / Capacity: 0.8L Liquid or 0.8kg Dry / 1 Speed & Pulse / Maxiblend canopy / Snap in plates for slicing and shredding functions / Includes spatula knife blade citrus juicer and whisk tool / Cord storage / Short name: Kenwood FP120