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23 Reviews

How does Nestle measure up against other confectionary companies?

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    23 Reviews
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      08.03.2010 13:40
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      Not for those with a social conscience

      Nestlé's very aggressive marketing tactics first came under fire in the 1970's when it was discovered that the company was unscrupulously pushing its baby milk products, to the detriment of breastfeeding in third world countries.

      As a result many babies died.

      On a simplistic level, Nestlé employed people to dress up as doctors and nurses to inform new mothers that its baby formula was superior to breastmilk, and since there was a lack of education, this obviously false theory was easily believed.
      Women were given a free six week supply of formula, and by the time it ran out their breastmilk had dried up, and they had no alternative but to continue to buy formula which they were unable to afford. Nestlé had given them no choice in how to feed their babies.

      So to make the product last longer, the ill-informed mothers resorted to watering down the milk too much, to save on milk powder. This, added to very poor water quality, led to many babies getting very sick and dying.

      These tactics by Nestlé led to a worldwide boycott of its products by many people, which continues to this day, due to the companies continual breach of the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes.

      Nestle has been found to ignore the guidelines which state formula should not be given a prominant position in supermarkets, and should not be marketed as an alternative to breastfeeding, among other things.

      To this day the company is thought to be breaching the WHO code, although Nestlé denies this. The company regularly refuses the opportunity to prove that it is now working within ethical guidelines.

      Because of this, many major organisations support the boycott and in the UK, 73 Student Unions, 102 businesses, 30 faith groups, 20 health groups, 33 consumer groups, 18 local authorities, 12 trade unions, as well as MP's and celebrities agree that Nestlé is not doing enough to improve its standards and practices.

      Remember this is not a debate about breastfeeding being better than formula. In developed countries women can make an informed choice about how they wish to feed their babies.
      We are lucky that formula is safe here and can be prepared using effective sanitisation and fresh water.
      In developing countries, however, breastfeeding makes much more sense as it provides immunity, as well as being much, much safer.

      This is only a very basic introduction to the issues surrounding the marketing of Nestlé baby milk, as the story is a long and complex one, with much having been written about it already.
      However I think it is an important one to keep in the public eye, as a company such as Nestlé should not be allowed to get away with this kind of behaviour.

      I, for one, have vowed to boycott all Nestlé products as I was horrifed to discover the true nature of the sinister tactics being employed against vulnerable women and children, but it is very difficult as the organisation is one which has its finger in many pies and has its name on a huge list of everyday products.

      For those wishing to find out more here are some useful links;

      www.babymilkaction.org
      www.babymilk.nestle.com
      www.breastfeeding.com/advocacy/advocacy_boycott.html
      www.who.int/nutrition/publications/code_english.pdf

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        08.12.2007 20:19
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        Chocolate heaven from the chiller

        ** This is a review of Nestlé 'Little Pots Of Heaven' chilled baked cream desserts, a category not specifically covered on dooyoo.co.uk **

        Ever had that yearning for a luscious, decadently-rich post-dinner treat or dessert that's intense enough to stun that craving for an intense chocolate hit without either having to stand slavering (yes, you read right!) over a bain-marie, or worse yet, waiting for some soufflé to emerge from the oven...?

        There is a "new" Nestlé dessert now in the chiller cabinet of your local Tesco (or similar), called "Little Pots of Heaven"; there is a chocolate variety of this dessert which will forever turn you truly to the Dark Side - read on only if you are brave, what I describe is not for the faint-of-heart!

        This chilled dessert presents as a 100g portion in a foil-topped glass jar, with two jars in a cardboard-overwrapped carton for £1.69 (occasionally £0.99 "on offer"). It's a French-made baked cream dessert, available in three flavours: chocolate; caramel, or vanilla. If you didn't gather from the opening paragraph of this review, I reiterate: my focus is the chocolate variety. I have tried all three varieties, and will compare all three later - but for the time being, let's focus on aiming our phasers, set on stun only, at that aforementioned postprandial chocolate craving...

        The two glass jars clink nicely as you undo the cardboard that joins them, separating these Siam-like twins. The gold foil on each jar peels nicely, easily and cleanly back off the lip of the jar, or "pot". What greets the eye is a smooth, set surface of dark, dark chocolate - just begging to be cast asunder by the hard, cold, probing spoon in your hand - I find a small teaspoon, the smaller the better (like a mustard spoon?), suffices here.

        By now, the craving for this luscious little spoonful should have your mouth a-watering, and as soon as the first miniscule dollop hits your tongue, you appreciate 2 important facts: first, the cold, creamy mass, melting, nay deliquescing, over your tongue has an amazing amount of chocolate presence, and secondly, the effect of drawing the spoon out between your lips leaves another layer of chocolate heaven on your lips, which needs more licking to appreciate fully... and so on.

        The texture is smooth, creamy; the taste, intense and sharply chocolate - not overly sweet, nor starchy. The pudding is firm, definitely a baked, firm surface that continues to hold the pudding's form as it is eaten - not sludgy, not slimy.

        The pot, for all its size, takes an awful amount of scraping to ensure that no remnants are left - those of a less fastidious nature have been known to actually try to lick the pot clean!

        Nutrition information is visually presented on the front of the carton, and I will not bore you with it here. Take it on faith - this pud is goood!

        The other two varieties are caramel and vanilla. Both have the same wonderful texture and mouth-feel as the chocolate variety, but the caramel variety has a much sweeter taste than the chocolate variety. The vanilla variety is more akin to the cream-part of a cream caramel or crème brulée, although again marred by that oversweetness found in the caramel variety.

        So, dear reader - yearn no more! Pass by the chiller section in Tesco and drop a pack of chocolate Nestlé 'Little Pots Of Heaven' into your trolley, mmmm....

        (c) pgn! on dooyoo.co.uk, Dec-2007.

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          21.10.2007 13:15

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          Could someone please tell me what has happened to tinned cream? I have been looking everywhere and just cannot find any. My father is 81yrs old and he swears his apple pie does not taste the same. I am one of nine children and we would fight to lick out the can { a habit I just cannot get out of }. Please tell me I can soon get my dad a tin.

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          22.05.2007 14:40
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          Great stuff, but my conscience hurts too much to purchase it

          ~~~~Who are Nestle?~~~

          In 1860 a Swiss chemist by the name of Henri Nestle designed a substitute breast milk formula for a premature infant who proved to be intolerant of his own mother’s milk and common substitutes. Its success led to widespread recognition and the founding of the nestle brand. In 1905, the company merged with the Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company, and together they extended their reach into the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and Spain with the opening of several factories.

          World war 1 brought great wealth in the form of government contracts to produce dairy products for troop consumption, but World War II was not so favourable. Nestle however did not fold. Its US arm gained more contracts for the American troops, most notably its development of Nescafe coffee . Switzerland’s neutrality of course meant it was free to continue to do business with Axis powers, and its subsidiaries in those countries continued to operate in some capacity

          The end of the war saw it expanding exponentially, acquiring such known popular brands such as Crosse and Blackwell in the UK, Stouffer’s in the US, and further diversification by its acquisition of L’Oreal Cosmetics in 1977. It continues to expand and diversify, making it one of the largest corporations in the world.


          ~~~~~~What Do They Make?~~~



          Nestle makes breakfast cereals, dairy products such as evaporated, dried, and condensed milks, food seasoning products, cosmetics, pet food, coffee, bottled waters, confectionary, infant milks and baby foods, “performance” enhancing foods for athletes, and diet foods (through its Jenny Craig arm of operations in the US). There is very little in the food and beverage consumption retail market that they do not have a product for.

          ~~~Quality and Value for Money~~~
          Nestle make their money by holding their products to a high legal standard, though they have been known to lobby politically to have those standards changed. One such effort has been as recent as 2007, with Nestle endorsing a move by the American Chocolate lobby to have the US government allow hydrogenated vegetable oils, known to be bad for the heart, to be allowed in place of cocoa butter in chocolate. They also wish to have artificial sweeteners and other additives allowed. Currently the law prohibits this as items containing these are not deemed true chocolate, and the US government is frowning on hydrogenated fats in general after several studies, with many manufacturers in the US and Europe removing these fats voluntarily from their recipes in the interest of public health. The reason for the lobby seems to be financial; hydrogenated oils are a lot cheaper than cocoa butter, and would lower the cost of making the chocolate. Nestle has a long record of trying to produce taste quality at a reasonable cost, with its brands selling for the market average, rather than high or low end.

          ~~~~Controversy~~~

          Nestle has over the years courted much controversy. The first of the controversies I will mention has been due to the Swiss position of neutrality during the war, and the firms and banks financial dealings with Axis powers. I have no personal knowledge of the ins and outs, but the general consensus is that Swiss banks, and the firms they bankrolled, dealt with tainted money. Whether Nestle had any part of it, or sold products to the Axis people, remains for others to dig and find out if it so interests them. I am making no claims there, but am mentioning the common feeling in several countries relating to the Swiiss, the war, and money in general.

          The second hint of controversy relates to its acquisitions. Companies that had previously had employee and publicly held shares found themselves entirely ran by Swiss nationals, as Nestle only allows Swiss citizens to hold stock. Nestle only trades on the Swiss stock exchange as well, presumably to keep this under tight control. This is a source of ire or many people, as the factories are often extremely important financially and politically in the areas they operate, and locals feel total foreign control to be unacceptable.

          The third issue that has arisen came about in 1977. A review by the WHO and UNICEF uncovered a scandal involving several multinational infant formula companies indulging in unethical marketing. The most serious violations took place in the developing world, where salesmen dressed in doctor’s coats advised the poverty stricken to use their infant milk instead of breast milk. They handed out 6 weeks worth of free powder, which meant the mother’s milk dried up, and then charged the same equivalent price for a tin of milk as they did in developed countries. This meant that people resorted to watering down the milks to make it last, so the babies starved to death in a prolonged fashion. In those countries much of the drinking water is unsafe and poor sanitation is available, so infants fed even properly constituted milks were dying from contaminated water sources and bacteria from unsterilised utensils. Nestle and the other companies were shamed into endorsing a code of professional practice, and appeared to be toeing the line, until the 1990’s when fresh allegations were made by victim’s parents and medical staff at clinics in those countries again, with Nestle's name to the fore. The whistle blowers have also complained of threats made to their persons and families over making the claims.

          Nor is the voluntary code of practice limited to developing countries. The benefits of breast milk over formula has meant that baby milks were to be shown as a second best substitute, yet in the US they also continue to give away free samples and coupons for discounts, while in Europe they have actively lobbied behind the lines to abolish breastfeeding awareness posters and events. Their actions have led to a renewal of the 1970’s boycott, with people around the world boycotting their most successful product, Nescafe. Many others refuse to buy anything “tainted” by the brand, and an entire website exists with a list of all its products, and pictures supplied and verified by the WHO of an infant who died in the past few years due to false information provided to her parents relating to breastfeeding. (You can visit the site yourself, it is www.babymilkaction.org). The current human toll of these practices stand at 400 dead infants a DAY.

          Nestle strongly continues to deny any wrong doing, and to try to clean up its image of the taking advantage of local trade regulation in the developing world by launching several fair trade brands, to woo back the socially conscious consumer. They were, however dealt a fourth blow when it came to light that while Ethiopia starved, nestle was demanding about £3 million from the struggling and bankrupt Ethiopian government as compensation. Oxfam reported that the money was sought from 2002, and is till being demanded, over the 1977 nationalisation of an agricultural firm they owned shares in. After the report, Nestle has continued its demand for full payment, but has publicly stated it will donate part of the funds towards famine relief.

          Nestle has also suffered image problems due to quality control. In Venezuela, they were found guilty of poor quality control monitoring after several tons of contaminated pet food entered the market. Hundreds of pets fed the contaminated Dog Chow, Cat Chow, Friskies, and their local brands of cattle and bird feed, died an agonising death.

          Environmentalists also show a disdain for Nestlé’s hunt of ways to expand. They brought to the attention of authorities that Nestle planned to siphon millions of litres of water from a reserve in order to feed it to its water bottling plant. An ongoing court battle is in place whereby concerned citizens in the state of Michigan where this is to be built lobby for an injunction.

          If those were not moral issues enough, China slammed Nestle for using genetically modified ingredients without proper labelling or authority, and now runs checks to ensure purity of the supply, while the spectre of slavery has also risen to haunt the enjoyment of their chocolate. Many plantations in cocoa growing areas make use of child slave labour, with the authorities admitting that children are often kept on ships offshore at night to prevent escape as well as detection by inspectors. These children are as young as 4 years old, and are often indentured slaves working to pay off a debt that never gets repaid, as food and water are added to the bill along with other expenses. Other children have been sold by the unscrupulous who befriend the paents and claim to have arranged educational opportunities for the child in the US and Europe. The work day is over 12 hours long, and they are expected to work a full adult shift. No education is provided, play time is non existent, and conditions are abysmal. The cocoa from these places is sold to the cocoa exchange and mixed with all other cocoa except organic and fair trade cocoas, so firms buying the “ordinary” cocoa end up with some produced by slaves. Consumers are lobbying nestle and the other chocolate giants to use their corporate might to change the way cocoa is sourced and supplied to help the consumer not support this unethical practice. To date, no such lobbying has occurred.


          ~~~My verdict~~~

          Well, my verdict is one of dismay. I cannot hold them entirely responsible for the slave trade, as they have no way to know where each bit of cocoa comes from, but I do find it odd they can use their political clout as a corporation to lobby for hydrogenated fats but not for change in the cocoa distribution methods. Added to the very real reports by the World Health Organisation and the UN on their continued third world marketing practices and lack of contributions towards reducing costs for those poor and helping to provide clean water and sanitation, I fear all I see is a company who while they make tasty and helpful products, has no moral conscience what so ever.

          It is for this reason we don't buy Nestle products if we can at all avoid it. I have not found this to be an issue however in most things. I drink Maxwell House or Rington’s coffee, and my children eat Aldi or own brands of healthier cereals. Admittedly, nestle make many of the supermarket own brands of cereal, but I still feel this is of help because Nestle still loses out on some of their profit shares. I can buy other chocolates, and use other milks in most cases, or make an acceptable substitute. All in all, I feel this is a company to avoid until they amend their ways, lest I seem to agree with corporate stance on profit seeking at all costs.


          “Evil is when good men do nothing.”

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            12.04.2007 00:53
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            You could do better.

            ** This is a review for Nestle Heaven Milk Truffle Chocolate. **

            Nestle have been doing a big promotion for their new range of Heaven bars lately, with free bars of chocolate being sent out to internet users, taste tests in supermarkets around the country and an advert played on all major television channels. As the UK's most boycotted brand, Nestle are clearly trying to get people hooked on a new range of choccy and back eating their products.

            Nestle Heaven chocolate bars retail at £1.39 each, or you can buy two for £2 at Tesco at the moment. If you signed up for Nestle's "Heaven Can't Wait" promotion online, you might have even received one of these full size 100g bars for free. That's how I got my sample to taste test for Dooyoo!

            The flavours available are dark truffle, milk truffle, hazelnut crème, milk orange truffle and café latte.

            Each chocolate bar is divided into twelve squares of milk chocolate with the "V" symbol from the Heaven logo embossed on each, all wrapped up in gold foil, and inserted into an indulgent thin cardboard box, dominated by a luxurious creamy background. The packaging is a bit wasteful really, but does the job well of looking like "posh choc".

            With the milk truffle version, inside each square of milk chocolate, there are bits of cocoa solids, which give a mildly satisfying crunch and add a richer, darker flavour to the product. The chocolate itself is however distinctly average. It's also worth pointing out, that although this product bills itself as "creamy, Swiss milk chocolate with a gorgeously rich truffle centre and real cocoa pieces", one of the main ingredients is hazelnut. Yes, along with the cocoa pieces, are bits of hazelnut. If you look on the back of the box, it does actually say this in charming size 6pt print, but seeing as it wasn't mentioned on the front in the little blurb, I stupidly managed to overlook this.

            For an average tasting chocolate, the price of my throat closing up and me feeling like I was dying, really was a bit too high to pay. Nestle promised I'd taste Heaven, and if I hadn't taken medication immediately, I might well have done. However, for your average person in the street without nut allergies, I doubt any form of Heaven would be close. Looking beyond my quite obvious new contempt and irrational dislike for the product, it's really just an okay-ish chocolate bar packaged up to look like it's something so much better.

            £1.39 will buy you a 150g twin pack of Galaxy Milk Chocolate, which tastes a damn sight nicer, and is safe for nut allergy suffers (well, in my experience, anyway).

            Not all of the varieties of Heaven contain nuts, but seeing as they're all probably made in the same place, I'm willing to believe that the possible "traces of other nut" described on the back probably are worth being cautious of, if you are a nut allergy sufferer.

            The conclusion?

            If you're not allergy to nuts and someone buys you one of these, it's worth eating. If you have to fork out £1.39... it's not so much. There are quite simply better products available on the market for this sort of money, and the packaging is a bit unnecessary. If you missed the "Heaven Can't Wait" promotion and live in England, it's worth having a look at the following link to find out if there are free tastings anywhere near you: http://specials.uk.msn.com/heaven/sample.aspx

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              09.12.2006 15:16
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              Cereal bar without oats, easy breakfast for people with no time.

              I have eaten Nestle products for many years and used their condensed milk for baking. I am well aware many people do not approve of the way they work, but I can am not judging them on this just reviewing the product which doesn't appear on Dooyooo.


              “Breakfast like a king. Lunch like a Prince . Dine like a Pauper”. An old saying, which really has a lot of sense in it. I always had a “Good cooked breakfast” before I left home to catch 2 buses to school, a journey of about 1 hour, or more if I missed the connection! My Mum believed that breakfast set you up for the day, and then I had school lunch (groans!) and a high tea when I got home, which eventually changed to an evening meal.

              Nowadays breakfast is just cereal or toast for many or even less for lots of people. Companies have produced cereal bars, which you grab and eat on your way, but care must be taken if driving as people are being fined for taking a sip from a can whilst in a traffic queue so the same could happen if you bite into a bar. But you can enjoy them at any time of day, as they make excellent snacks and as they are wrapped fit into a handbag or lunch box easily.

              There are 2 flavours, Apricot and Green Tea or Red Berry. They were launched in May 2004, but so far, I have only eaten the red Berry.

              What does the box look like?

              Bright blue box, with Sveltesse and Nestle logo in red, with a picture of a girl leaping into the air and “liberate your belly button”, plus a picture of the actual bar with pieces of chocolate and a raspberry and Strawberry.. It measures 15 x 12.5 x 4.5 cm and also states in 3 ticked circles that it is under 100 cals per bar, a source of fibre and dipped in chocolate. On the side of the box, it simply says cereal and fruity pieces dipped in a blend of milk and dark chocolate. The best before date on my last box was 05/08/2005 and the instructions are to store in a cool and dry place. There is also the compulsory list of ingredients and nutritional information, plus the link to the Nestle website, which is www.nestle.co.uk

              What does the bar look like?

              Wrapped in a bright blue sealed foil wrapper, with similar picture to the box, it has an expensive, exciting look. Well I’m excited, because it looks delicious! I also know what it tastes like! The bar is about 10cm long, 3.5 wide and 2cm deep. It has a chocolate covered base and the top is a mixture of cream and brown glazed cereal pieces and chunks of red fruits. Some of the pieces looked like pieces of almonds but although it says, may have trace of peanuts that is a safety warning and in fact, there are no nuts in the contents. Only disappointing thing is a few bites and it's gone!

              What does it smell like?

              Opening the packet the first thing I could smell was the rich chocolate, I later noticed the red berry fruity smell.

              What is the texture like?

              A lovely crunchy, rather than chewy texture. Much nicer than the usual cereal bars when I feel I am munching on the cockatiels chew! Or something more suited to a rabbit. The red berry fruits are actually not freeze dried pieces or even dried pieces of fruit, but rather like jelly tots that have had the sugar licked off! The fruit juices have been turned into a jelly, and chopped up into uniform square pieces. The chocolate on the base could be thicker for me though.

              What does it taste like?

              There is an explosion of flavours, the chocolate is quite powerful, and the fruit has a slightly synthetic strawberry flavour but is OK, the cereal has a lovely mix of flavours of wheat and maize, thankfully no oats which can cause havoc with my digestion. They all blend together to give a really tasty snack.

              How many calories did you say?

              Yes, chocolate and only 98 calories. Each bar has 2.5g of fat


              How much does it cost?

              £1.59 at Tesco for 6 bars. That works out at 26.5p each. Not cheap but good to have occasionally if you want a change from a bowl of cereal or to boost a packed lunch.

              Would I recommend them?

              Yes, I still have other types of cereal bars in the cupboard but I admit these are the ones for me at the moment.

              Will I liberate my belly button as the packet advertises?

              Wait and see after my next holiday review!

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                24.07.2006 12:40
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                Tasty, yummy, delicious and good for dieters

                I've just rediscovered these after years of not having them and I have to say that they are far better than I remembered. The taste of them is so unique.

                I'm doing the Slimming World diet and I'm allowed 28g of Shreddies as my 'Healthy Extra' alllowance every day which I have with semi-skimmed milk (approx 190ml).

                I've found Shreddies very filling and stop me eating anything else until lunchtime. If I eat Shreddies for breakfast it's normally at around 7.15am and I don't eat lunch until 12.00noon and have no desire to snack in between, however, they are so tasty that I could eat the whole damn box rather than my measly 28g but nevermind - we have to suffer for our health I guess!

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                  19.10.2005 19:47
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                  nestle - just plan nasty

                  Hello people of dooyoo

                  its got to be said that all of you know your stuff bout nestle and its great to see that im not the only one thinks they suck.

                  Their ethicscore rating speaks for itself and the baby milk thing is in excuseable.

                  I was glad to see that FINALLY they have got a Fairtrade product in the shops but they are along way from winning themselves a place in my shopping basket. They need to adress all issues enviromental problem, moral issues, expolation of human and animal before they can be trusted

                  Hopefully if we all continue to boycott them they will listen

                  keep spreading the word peeps
                  you all rock

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                    01.10.2005 12:54
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                    Chocolate and nuts together makes this a nutty treat.

                    I popped into the garage intending only to pay for my diesel, and there staring at me was a bar called 'Nuts'. Being a chocolate and nuts lover, I just couldn't help myself and found I was paying for one despite having already had some chocy today. Oh well bang goes the diet. There's always tommorrow.

                    Nuts.

                    The packaging is very eye catching, it's a yellow packet with 'Nuts' across the middle in red, so it stood out very well from the other chocolate bars on offer. It was almost shouting at me to be purchased.

                    The bar is very similar in shape and size to a mars bar. The nougat is very soft and is a pale creamy colour. Over the nougat is a layer of caramel, and the whole thing is covered in milk chocolate. The nuts are more or less whole and are inside the layer of nougat.

                    The taste.

                    The first bite was at first quite sweet, I noticed how soft it felt and thought I was going to be disappointed, but once I got chewing it , I could really taste the peanuts. They were also quite crunchy as they were whole.
                    The chocolate is just like the chocolate of a mars bar, making the whole bar delicious. I nearly didn't get to save any for home so I could write this!

                    They can't really be compared to a Snickers bar as they are a whole lot softer. The nuts are crunchy but not in a hard way like a Snickers is. I think because the nougat is so soft, it makes the feel of the whole bar seem softer.

                    Cost.

                    As I say, it was bought from a garage, so haven't compared to other places, but I paid 40p for this bar, which considering how much I have enjoyed it, I would say was a good buy.

                    Nutrional Information.

                    There is a lot of information on the packet in both English and Dutch I presume about the ingredients, but it dosen't mention anything else. There is no information about calories or fat content etc.
                    They are made from the looks of the packet in Amsterdam. The packet says:

                    'Nestle Nederland BV. PO Box 12365. 1100 AJ Amsterdam, Holland.

                    I would definetly buy these again if I see them. If you like chocolate and nuts, you will love these.

                    First written for Ciao under my ciao name of Craggsy23

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                      22.08.2004 20:40
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                      Dear Nestle, I feel there are some things I need to get off my chest. I don't like you. In fact, I hate you. There, I've said it. And now I've said it, I think it's time I told you exactly why. ? I hate you because your children's cereals are so expensive. Currently, at Tesco, a 375g ? 12 serving ? pack of Honey Nut Cheerios costs £1.63. A pack of my usual cereal, Weetabix, also a 12 serving size, costs £1.24. A Weetabix serving is not only 20% bigger than a serving of your offering, it is fully 25% cheaper. Why is this? ? I hate you because your children's cereals have so much added sugar. The sugar content of Honey Nut Cheerios, for example, runs at over a third of the total; 35.2% to be precise. Only one twentieth of a Weetabix biscuit is sugar. Why are you trying to rot my teeth? Why are you trying to rot my children's teeth? ? I hate you because your cereals are too salty. A recommended serving of Honey Nut Cheerios will pump half a gram of salt into me. I'm only supposed to eat six grams of salt in an entire day. Honey Nut Cheerios are a sweet breakfast cereal, why do they also need to be a salty one? Why are you trying to up my blood pressure and put me at risk of a multitude of health problems, including strokes? ? I hate you because you pretend your cereals are healthy by going on and on about their added vitamins. What is the point of an over-processed food that then adds synthetic vitamins to replace what was lost? Why don't you just admit that supplements are only necessary for people who eat crap like the cereals you produce all day every day? I would rather get my vitamins BEFORE they've been manufactured OUT of my food, thank you. I'd
                      rather eat them as I am supposed to ? in foods in which they naturally occur. Please don't try to fool me that your products are healthy, because they are not. ? I hate your cereals because they have so many peculiar and horrible ingredients. I understand that a honey and nut flavoured breakfast cereal will contain cereal grain, honey and nuts. What I don't understand is the need to include a swathe of unpleasant sounding extras, to whit: Partially Inverted Brown Sugar Syrup, Partially Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil, Trisodium Phosphate, Flavouring, Antioxidant, Tocopherols. What are these items? ? I hate you insist on continuing to market your baby milk formula in the developing world in ways which contravene an internationally agreed code of conduct and which put babies' lives at risk. Why do you think it is ok to flout international codes and why do you have such a total disregard for human life? Don't the poor and the powerless count? Don't babies lives matter to you? They matter to me. ? I hate you too because of the way you treat coffee farmers across the world. Millions of people are out of work by your refusal to trade fairly or to concede any ground at all. Why do you think it ok to bully powerless people like this? Why do you destroy businesses? Why does your range not include a Fair Trade coffee so that your customers can make their own choice? ? I hate you because you misrepresent the unfair way you do business and the suffering you cause real people. I hate the way you employ marketing and advertising men to spin the truth. Why aren't you using the hundreds of thousands of pounds you spend creating these smokescreens to benefit the people you are mistreating and bullying? ? I hate you because it is so darned difficult to avoid buying your
                      products. You have your sticky fingers in just about every slice of the pie, don't you? It's maddening. And the rate at which you buy and sell brand names is just plain ridiculous. You're into coffee, chocolate, cereals. You're into petfood. You're into soft drinks. I don't want to buy anything you have anything to do with and I resent the fact that you're making it so difficult for me. Are you intent on world domination or something? ? I hate you because your promotions are designed to blackmail parents into buying a nutritionally poor, ridiculously sweet cereal for their children's breakfasts. What is this Box Tops For Education scam? Why does a begging note to purchase your unhealthy cereal appear on the school newsletter sent from our headmaster? I have already saved 39p by buying a HEALTHY cereal, Weetabix, for my children's breakfast and your token is worth only 10p. It's a scam, not a bloody donation! I'm sending my children in with the money, not a cut out from your box top. ? I hate you because your last freebie, The Pro Football PC CD-Rom, caused me to have a row with my son in the middle of the supermarket. I rarely argue with my son, and I resent the fact that your advertising campaign and your sneaky choice of freebie caused my son to be determined to buy a packet of your Honey Nut Cheerios. I made him buy it with his pocket money. ? I hate you because the fact that I made my son buy your Honey Nut Cheerios with his pocket money, caused me to have a row with my husband in the middle of the supermarket. He said that at times, I take ethics too far. Too far? Goshdarnit, as far as you are concerned, I don't take them far enough. ? I hate you because, having bought
                      Honey Nut Cheerios with his pocket money, my son discovered the Pro Football PC CD-Rom to be utter crap and to add insult to injury, he didn't like eating them because they are so sweet they "made his teeth ache". Damn and blast, but I hate you, Nestle. You suck. Unkind regards Disgruntled of Devon Capital letters courtesy of: http://www.chuckleweb.co.uk/fixit.php

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                        05.06.2004 04:09
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                        Smarties Since I was a small kid I have loved those sugar crisped treats known as Smarties and I recon that this is as popular with kids as Calpol is. ~ Boring Bits. ~ *Nutrition Information: Energy: 1933kJ/460kcal Protein: 4.1g Carbohydrate: 73.5g Fat: 16.6g *Ingredients: Milk Chocolate (57%) (Made up of: Sugar, cocoa mass, cocoa butter, dried skimmed milk, butterfat, whey powder, vegetable fat, lactose, emulsifier (lecithin) flavouring) Sugar, Wheat Flour, Modified starch, Colours (E171, E104, E124, E110, E122, E133, E120), Glazing Agents (Carnauba wax, beeswax), Flavourings. *Contact Information: Web: www.nestle.co.uk Post: Nestlé Consumer Services PO Box No203 York YO91 1XY England Phone: 0080063785385 (UK % ROI) ~ Health. ~ NHS recommends the following guidelines to requirements daily in take: *Calories: - Women: 2000cals, Smarties provide 23% of this. - Men: 2500cals, Smarties provide 18.4% of this. Well as a snack it provides with a 5th of your daily calories this does not really leave much room for your other 3 meals. But if you are not getting a lot of time to eat then provides you with a nice high percentage to keep you going. *Fat: - Women: 70g, Smarties provide 23.7% of this. - Mean: 95g, Smarties provide 17.5% of this. Again about a 5th of your daily guideline Lets compare this to another snack food, the healthier yogurt. I am using a ?Co-op Greek Style Natural Yogurt (made with cows milk) 150g pot? so it is not even low fat an d its using proper full fat milk. Using the same 100g measurement: Type: Yogurt (Smarties) Energy: 580kj (1933kj) Calories: 140 (460) Protein: 5g (4.1g) Carbohydrate 7g (73.5g) Fat: 10g (16.6g) As we can see Smarties are not the healthiest option around. ~ Advantages of Smarties.
                        ~ *Hyper Effect: Smarties are jammed packed full of colours and flavouring as well as sugar, it?s enough to get any child hyper and running around like a mad freight train. If you see this has an advantage is another thing and from an 18-year-old point hyper is fun, who does not like to see kids having fun? Also for older people it contains sugar and chocolate, which helps release certain hormones that make us happy, it?s a legal high. *Taste/Texture: Smarties give that great crunchy effect mixed with the softness of milk chocolate. Really have got that right mix of sugar shell and milk chocolate mix. *How you eat yours? Everyone has a personnel way of eating Smarties if it be pouring a number on to your hand and popping them into your mouth, pouring out an amount from the tube, or eating them one-by-one. I personally pour the whole tube into my mouth and them that way. *Those little caps: For those who do not know with each tube you get a little top thing that is made of different colour plastics they each contain a letter I think they idea is you collect as many as you need to spell a word, I don?t know I?ve never collected many of them because I eat too wider range of chocolate, but id like to hear of anyone?s words. ~ Price. ~ Around my local newsagents I have to pay a big 40p for a packet of these but you can pick them up for 30p at newsagents easily plus you can pick up multi-packs of 4 for 99p so about 25p a packet, great value. Also from ?Pound Land? you can get very big tubes like novelty ones for a pound, I do not know how much these normally retail for but they are bigger and fatter, about 5 normal tubes. ~ Nestlé ~ This is a really big turn off for me; no matter how good the chocolate is I just have morals. Nestlé go to third world countries and give the mothers free powdered milk just enough supply so that the natural source is unused and they run dry, once this bi
                        t is used up they then bleed them dry with the pricing of the powdered milk that they can not really afford so a lot of children die as a result. My school used to have a lot of Nestlé vending machines but these got boycotted so badly that they couldn?t make a profit from 2,500 hungry students with a rubbish dinner hall. ~ In Short. ~ A great chocolate if the Nestlé thing does not bother you. ~ Disclaimer ~ If you decided you are going to like Smarties from my review and you do not you can not ask me for a refund or any personnel repayment. **Thank You** Take Care © David James Clark DavidJamesClark@hotmail.com (any question e-mail or add me to msn messenger or 44(0)7733107699)

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                          06.07.2003 21:02
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                          Oh come on, you didn't think I meant anything other than a caramel filled sponge cake did you? Well after my nightmare with the unpleasant and chalky tasting Rolo Ice cream bars I tried a while back, you’d think that I wouldn’t be daft enough to try out another gimpy Rolo gimmick would you? Well you’d be wrong because I am, I suppose I’m either as thick as two short planks with an appetite for punishment or I just believe in giving everything a redeeming chance (Choose your own version). Anyway, I wandered through the local supermarket on Saturday (Yes it was Morrisons before anyone asks) and I spied some deliciously drooly looking chocolate muffins, the only problem was that the word Rolo was on the pack. Naturally I was nervous about picking them up, I thought if nothing else, they would make great op fodder and into my basket they went. So, here are my findings: Packaging: Hmmm? Typical brown box displaying the red Rolo sign with a comfy looking golden muffins sign underneath (You know what I mean by comfy looking big rounded puffed up lertters). The muffins are in an open top box so you can see the actual product (kind of like looking at a bird with big tits in a nice open top sports car) and then the box is kindly covered in cellophane to stop fly’s, moths, assorted fungus and children’s fingers taking little nibbles from the top of the cakes. Each muffin comes inside a little paper bun case (Aren’t they kind?) and they sit in a plastic holder at the bottom of the box (Total waste of packaging if you ask me). Oh, on the side of the box is a picture of a (cut in half) muffin with loads of droolicious caramel oozing from inside. Taste, Look and Smell: On first glance the muffins look very, well, errm, muffin like, big brown and chunky, kind of like the famed ‘cupcakes’ the Lisa Simpson makes in The Simpsons. The top of the cake is shrou
                          ded over and from a distance the whole thing would look like a nuclear explosion or mushroom cloud (Grin). The chocolate chips are clearly visible and so add to the tasty look which is always a good thing. As for the smell, well, they don’t smell like a freshly baked cake like they seem to suggest but they smell more cocoa like and bitter than one would expect. Now comes my favourite part as always, the guzzling part. As I bite into my large muffin I am greeted with a mixture of flavours, the sponge cake is quite heavy and dense (like Muffins are supposed to be which makes them filling) and like the smell, the taste is quite bitter and cocoa like rather than the sweet taste of normal chocolate. There are plenty of chocolate chips to satisfy even the most demanding of choccy fans and in the middle of the cake is a decent helping of soft, oozing, Rolo caramel. The point here is that unlike the horrid Rolo Ice Cream bars that I tried a few weeks ago, the mixture of flavours here do seem to blend quite well. There is the bitterness of the sponge cake, the sweet chocolatey taste of the choccy chips and the sweet and creamy Rolo centre. The only gripe I would have about them is that the caramel (As with the Ice cream bars) doesn’t go all the way through the cake and so the bottom can be a little on the dry side. Price and Availability: As I have already said, I bought these from Morrisons, they were 99p for a packet of four muffins which are also available as a Yorkie variety (Which I have since tried and was not too impressed with). I think that these are only available in the big supermarkets as I have yet to see them in any small shop but the Rolo version is well worth picking up. Other Information: Here’s the bad news, if you are on a diet then look away now, each Rolo muffin contains a whopping 14.5g of fat and 290 calories (that’s an inch on your waistline then). They also contain nu
                          t traces so if you’re allergic, you’d best leave them on the shelf. My Final Thoughts: Well as you’ve probably guessed, I quite enjoyed these and at 99p for four (25p each) I think they are pretty good value for money. Like I said though, I have tried the Yorkie variety and they are basically the same as the Rolo Muffins but the caramel inside is replaced with a hard lump of Yorkie chocolate and they are quite bland. So, if you are a fan of chocolate muffins and you like the caramel flavour inside your average Rolo then you’ll probably like these as well, so go on, treat yourself. Thanks for the read. DEANO!

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                            11.05.2003 03:15
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                            In the modern business world we live in, businesses generally speaking abide by the laws of the land relating to their company and therefore there is a basic ethical level which must be followed to avoid prosecution, in the U.K. at least. The problem being that a basic level of ethics is not always appropriate, the line between something that is ethical/unethical is drawn by us, people, what do we percieve to be right or wrong. If people as a whole dont think that something is wrong, then ethically it isnt. The business world has a wonderful tendency to be inside the rules of law, and therefore away from prosecution but they seem to flaunt there right to exploit people and countries in the best interests of their business. When you purchase a pair of trainees or a tracksuit from a sports shop the chances are that it has been produced in a sweatshop somewhere in ASIA, and some company's try to give fair wages in the country, others simply dont. With Nestle, they produce there products in the E.U./America and therefore arnt exploting there workers but they are exploiting the consumer, the consumer in the third world. In places in Africa where people earn only a fraction of what me or you would earn, are being conned into buying Nestle's baby health/nutrition products which will do more worse than good. In many places in Africa such as Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Uganda and Kenya access to the basics that we take for granted such as a supply of safe water are in very short supply. Having to travel miles to a dirty and infected stream to gain water to drink, which you know may kill your child, but its either that or nothing. Could you do that? With the products that Nestle offer, water is a vital ingredient, so when you add infected water to baby milk products, guess what you get. Infected and unsafe baby milk! When a mother breastfeeds there is the natural protection against infection as the milk is already safe, therefore little or
                            no chance of it being unsafe. +The Nestle salespersons that pose as health consultants to promote Nestle products to say its better than natural feeding. UNETHICAL & IMMORAL! +Nestle giving free samples of their products to third world countries, as the mothers will feel obliged to buy it when the free stock runs out therefore endagering their children. UNETHICAL & IMMORAL! +Nestle producing products that are aimed at the third world but are not in the native language of the third world, therefore health warnings are not readable. UNETHICAL & IMMORAL! As a whole, Unethical! According to UNICEF, children who are fed artificial milk are 25 times more likely to die from Diarrohea than a child that is fed from breastfeeding. Nestle are aware of the facts, but are too happy with their profits to be bothered with the Ethical and moral Problem. Nestle just say that the plight of the third world country is an outdated one, the problems that existed 20 years because of them dont exist today. They couldnt be further from the Truth. Im not trying to say that Nestle is the only company with diabolical business practices, but it is one of the main ones and it happens to be the one im writing about. I personally boycott all Nestle products in protest, im not funding Baby-Killers. © James D 2003 (This review like all of my others, is on Ciao aswell, and was written by me there, so i am not plagiarising, it is just a copy)

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                              26.02.2003 20:35
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                              I know the title is controversial but this is true. I am not trying to scare people or just get free points but this is a controversial subject I have felt strongly about for a number of years now and I have evidence to back it up. Everyone knows that not breast feeding babies can be damaging and Nestle can hardly be blamed for providing this substitute. They are though the biggest babymilk seller in the U.K and UNICEF have estimated that up to 1.5 MILLION babies die every year because they are not breast fed. What is criminal is the marketing campaign that they employ as they really try to push the product on young mothers. This in itself is disgusting but not illegal, after all the breast milk industry is growing to be worth billions of dollars each year around the world. What is illegal though is that Nestle have not been adhering to the World Health Organization Marketing Code to show the consumers potential problems. The problem is not so bad here as people are generally well informed of problems and have a clean water supply. Nestle though also push this product in less well informed developing countires like Bangladesh and Brazil. In these places they give out free samples in hospitals and to young mothers while not fully informing them of the problems. Further to this the packets that are distributed are printed in Englih so mothers have no information at all and would often mix the formula with dirty water believing it was good for their babies. The subject has been brought to the attention of the U.S senate and in 1972 Nestle admitted they were not fully informing mothers of potential problems. They are still not doing this today. This issue has been raised in a number of documentries such as the Mark Thomas comedy project while you can find a number of anti Nestle sites on the internet now. These include: http://www.infactcanada.ca/NestleBoycott.htm http://www.i-case.com/newdemo/inffeed/docs/berne.htm <
                              br>http://pub137.ezboard.com/fminnesotacoalitionrecordsfrm42.showMessage?topicID=37.topic http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/3038/1998/N11_11_98.htm I feel I must state that it obviously is not the intention of Nestle to kill babies but they know the effects of the product and simply are not doing enough about it because the product is worth too much to them. Because of this they are infact responsible for thousands of child deaths throughout the world and I would urge you to boycot this product and any other produced by Nestle.

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                                16.02.2003 14:11
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                                We have Mr Henri Nestle to thank for what was the fourth highest selling boxed chocolate in the year 2000, After Eight mints. Mr Nestle started out in 1867 with a modest little set up in Switzerland selling the first milk food for children but wow, not such a small set up now. Nestle produce everything from chocolate to Buitoni pasta and even coffee and Herta Frankfurters. The After Eight first appeared in 1962 and although many other after dinner mints are now available, these classics sold 42 million pounds worth in 2000 and remain top dog for that after dinner treat. All this information and more can be found at their website www.nestle.co.uk. Packaging ---------- The box is predominatly dark green with a hint of lighter green around the gold clock giving us a shadow look. The clock (showing the time as 8 o'clock), appears between the bold white words After and Eight. You have the name Nestle in the top left, thin chocolate mints in the bottom right and is the same on three sides. On the forth side (the bottom) you will find your bar code and ingredients but no nutrition information. Here you can also find their address and phone number should you wish to contact them, P.O Box 203, York, YO91 1XY or 0800 860 020. The box is about 10 inches long and 3 inches deep and weighs 300g. They do come in smaller boxes for those of you who can not stop at 5. Simple but effective, looking good at any table. Prices ------ I purchased my box at Tesco for £1.68 not bad as that works out just under 5p per chocolate but if you would like to spend more, Sainsburys sell them for £1.81 and Safeway a huge £2.12. O.K boring bit over now we can have some fun. Let me in --------- Now to get to these you have to first take off the outer see through film surrounding the box (didn't I mention this, silly me), then pull back the flap to reveal 34 (strange number don'
                                t you think), pockets of individual pleasure. Smell ----- Nose descending, mind focused I can smell the mint followed by dark chocolate, heaven. It is not over- powering just enough to entice. The chocolate is not a milky kind of smell and not very sweet but combined with the mint, a sweetness is present. Time is up ---------- I have been a good girl and waited until now to try these (all in the name of research), so with no further ado, here I go. STOP Oh what now? A black paper pocket stops me from biting and I know you will want me to tell you about these too. Oh do you have to be so picky! O.K these treasures are protected in individual black paper pockets. upright in the box standing to attention held firm by ridges so as not to fall over. On the front are the words After Eight below that little clock again and plain on the back. Is that enough for you? Can I eat one now? Pulled from it's sleeve, I inspect this inch by inch (just over 2), square of chocolate. Dark in appearance with little ripples on one side and the words After Eight etched all over the back. This slender (only a couple of millimetres thick), treats time is up. First comes the crunch of the dark smooth chocolate (crunchier if taken from the freezer), followed by white smooth mint. Rich in flavour but not sickly (unless you eat the whole box). The chocolate is not too thick and the mint inside is not runny but the word gooey comes to mind. The taste is of real dark chocolate and fresh mint. Combined together to make a mouth watering experience. Kept in a cool place these treasures have a life span of about a year so no need to pig out upon opening. As there is no nutritional information on the box, I can only assume that eating these will add alittle to the waistline but no mention of a nut. Conclusion ----------- Even though I only seem to bu
                                y these at Christmas or for special dinner dates, I love them. They are a classic after dinner mint that willl I am sure, stand the test of time. Go on treat yourself. Thanks as always for reading Michelle ---x---

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