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Philips Energy Saver

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11 Reviews

An energy saving stick light bulb.

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    11 Reviews
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      18.09.2013 19:46
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      An energy saving, money saving light bulb.

      In a cupboard in my kitchen I have my stock of light bulbs. I have just counted and there are eleven of the energy saving variety. Most of them have been there for between five and ten years. Therein hangs the light bulb.

      I started using the CFL (compact fluorescent light or lamp) about ten years ago. I didn't change them all over at once. I started with the hall and stairs and gradually started to use them in the living rooms and bedrooms as the incandescent bulbs gave way or ran out. It must be several years since I last put one in and I have never had to replace one. That's why my stock of bulbs is gathering dust in a cupboard. This in itself is a great advertisement for using energy saving bulbs.

      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      PHILIPS ENERGY SAVING BULBS
      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      To be honest, the Philips isn't the only make of bulb I use, but I think it sets a good standard of efficiency and reliability. I've been using their 11 watt stick bulb that they say will last ten years for about...well, ten years.

      So I can testify to the fact that they do last. There was a time when I seemed always to be climbing onto chairs and reaching up to light fittings. Those days are gone. I don't "do" bulb changing anymore (well, not often).

      An 11 watt bulb should give out the equivalent of a 60 watt light bulb, which is about 600 lumens. I used to think that a 60 watt bulb would be insufficient for a living room or dining room, but for my modestly sized rooms these are quite bright enough.

      This kind of bulb is commonly available for the bayonet or Edison screw type fittings.

      This particular type is unsuitable for dimmer lights, but bear in mind that since I bought these bulbs the technology has advanced considerably. There are bulbs that are now suited to dimming, to fitting base-up, to providing different qualities of light, to spotlights....the range is impressive and can suit most needs. The tornado spiral offers instant light in a daylight tone; the standard looks more like an old incandescent, offers a soft tone and is slightly less efficient than some of the others; the candle and lustre varieties come in lower wattages and are intended for softer room lighting, perhaps in lamps and wall lights; the globe is produced in a wider range of wattages and can be used to light a room if required and is perhaps a more attractive option than the stick as a bulb that might be visible; their spotlight bulb comes as an 8w (32w).


      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      SO JUST HOW EFFICIENT ARE THEY?
      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      A few years ago, when the EU decided that energy inefficient incandescent lights should be phased out, there were plenty of Euro-bashers who took a dim view, and were quick to complain that their rights were being infringed. However it was what they call, I believe, a "no brainer". The arguments for moving over to energy saving bulbs were compelling.

      The spiral and stick type bulbs, tend to be more efficient than the more conventional looking ones, but energy efficient bulbs will typically use between a fifth and a quarter of the electricity of an incandescent bulb. So that's at least a quarter of the cost to the householder. A quarter of the power. A quarter of the CO2 emissions in producing that power.

      Besides, consider all that energy you're saving by not climbing up and down on chairs all the time!

      !!!!!!!
      COST
      !!!!!!!

      These bulbs are more expensive than their incandescent counterparts. Online you could buy this sort of bulb for £2-3 per unit, maybe less. The current price with Wickes is £2.49, for instance. Prices really do vary a lot so it's worth shopping around. In the past there have been schemes to promote energy saving that involved free bulbs being given out. I received some from British Gas at one point. Councils sometimes make them available for households on low incomes. There seem to be plenty on offer on ebay. Sometimes people find themselves with bulbs of the wrong fitting type and look to get rid of them cheaply. I've seen them on Freecycle too.

      The thing is that even if you have to pay, say, £6.00 per unit, you're easily going to get that back over the life of a bulb. The Energy Saving Trust reckons that you could save at least £3.00 per year per bulb in the cost of electricity. Add to that the cost of buying replacement incandescent bulbs and assume (conservatively) a lifespan of eight years and you are comfortably recouping the outlay.

      You might want to look at more powerful bulbs. Philips' 18w bulb gives 1100 lumens (82 watts) and is selling from Energy Bulbs .co.uk also for £2.49.


      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      CONCERNS
      !!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Some of the early CFLs were slow to light up, but generally speaking they are much quicker now, and it was never a long time, anyway. I can't honestly say that this has ever been an inconvenience, or an annoyance to me.

      Some people didn't like the quality of light when these first came out, but this is something else that seems to have improved, and there is a better range of lamps available to suit different purposes.

      There have been some health and safety concerns in relation to energy saving bulbs. One is about the higher level of UV radiation emitted. As I understand it this is a) very low and b) only likely to be a hazard if you spent a lot of time very near to the bulb.

      Some types of bulbs are reported as being more likely to cause migraines, but this is apparently less likely with this kind of stick bulb, like the Philips model discussed here.

      CFLs contain a small amount of mercury, but this is not regarded as a hazardous level. When your light bulb does eventually give up the ghost, you should be able to dispose of it safely at your local waste disposal and recycling centre.

      And it must be safer not climbing on those chairs.

      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      RECOMMENDATION
      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      It's five stars from me, both for the Philips product specifically and in general for the idea of using low energy bulbs. Apparently LED lights are even more efficient. I might start looking at them, if I ever manage to use up my stock of CFLs!

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        04.08.2013 19:31
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        save energy, save money long term

        Energy Saving light bulb

        I bought 2 of these Phillips 20 w Energy Saving light bulbs when I moved in to my new flat up here in West Yorkshire, there were bulbs missing in the bedroom and hall plus the bathroom and kitchen lights didn't work. The bathroom and kitchen needed halogen ones, and the broken hall light was replaced with a standing lamp.

        I fitted one of the Phillips plug in and turn 'normal' bayonet cap fitting light bulbs in the bedroom. The bulb is a lot bigger than a normal bulb and also a lot more expensive. It is not one of the ones made up of 3 loops, I have had those, these are strange big bulbs which are super long lasting or apparently are.

        Energy Saving light bulbs in general are supposed to last about 10 years, but I have had one blow in a couple of months when the power kept cutting out and it also blew the circuits on half the things that were plugged in. But with normal use they should apparently use less power and last longer and so save money. This 20 w bulb is the same as an old 100w bulb but seems slightly dimmer, but it does come on more or less straight away, unlike other energy bulbs I've had or other peoples experience, maybe they are a newer design.

        Do not but the screw in one buy mistake, as it seems some people have reviewed that bulb as one they use all over the house. I have bought one of those screw fitting ones before by mistake, it was an old conventional bulb, and the packet wasn't clear, or I was not looking. I have never seen anywhere where they fit in, or why there are so many.

        Anyway, the only thing is these bulbs are so big, they tend to look a bit strange. You may want to check your shade does cover them first. I try and save energy where I can, and leave the light off until I need it in the evening, so my 10 000 hours should last as long as I am here,( I will leave the bulb, I'm not that mean).

        These bulbs should be 80 % cheaper to run than a standard bulb last 10 000 hours and only cost £3 so it seems that Energy Saving light bulbs have become a realistic alternative to 'normal' bulbs.

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        21.02.2013 11:27
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        Why would you not use them?

        A 600 mile light bulb!
        ---------------------------

        Electricity is increasingly expensive. One reason for this is the decision to privatise what should clearly be a government owned concern. But money talks, particularly to politicians. They told us that competitiveness would price fair prices. Unfortunately it drove price fixing. Now, my electricity supplier is not only a for-profit company, it is a French for-profit company.

        I have nothing against the French, particularly non-Parisians, but it demonstrates quite how useless politicians of whatever stripe tend to be. What is in my control is how efficiently I run my home in order to reduce as much as possible the money I fork over to the fellas on bikes wearing striped shirts and black berets.

        I remember a time when energy saving light bulbs were a thing of expensive curiosity. For some strange reason, they tended to look like a crystalline Mr Whippy. Well, now prices have come down. Wherever I can, I will always use an energy efficient bulb of the florescent persuasion.

        The Science bit
        --------------------

        Energy bulbs such as the Philips 20w I typically buy from Sainsbury for under a fiver promise savings of up to 80% and a life of up to six years. It seems like magic of the highest order, but like most things there is a simple reason at the heart of it all.

        Your typical light bulb is incandescent. This means 80% (there's that figure again!) of the energy going into it is converted to heat, not light. Energy saving bulbs are Fluorescent instead. The design produces far less heat. Go home and try it out. Leave each light on for half an hour, then put your hand near the bulb. Bingo and Yahtzee, my friend.

        Does this mean in the winter that your old-style inefficient light bulb helps warm your home while the new hotness does not? Yep. But you are paying for that extra energy either way. So why are they shaped like they are? Because they contain a gas, and are coated within with phosphor. When electricity passes through this gas, it makes the phosphor coating glow.

        I've been using these bulbs for the last few years. The light they produce may only be 20 watts, but it is by no means dim. They light a hallway or a room with a friendlier, less harsh glow and they certainly seem to last, if not quite six years, certainly a couple.

        They are just as easy to fit, though longer than a standard bulb. This can look a little odd at first, particularly if they jut slightly out of a small lamp, but you quickly get used to it.

        While not strictly relevant to this review, I recently had some glass shelving put in with some LED strip lighting behind it. This is even more energy efficient and looks beautiful in an otherwise darkened room.

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          14.12.2012 10:26
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          okay

          About a year ago my husband and I went through the house and replaced as many bulbs as we could with energy saving ones.

          There was a huge drive to try to reduce energy bills and I thought these bulbs would be a great idea. My daughter couldn't believe we didn't have any energy saving bulbs already. We bought a variety so that they would fit in all connections and also fit in our lamps.

          My husband fitted them and said they were easy enough to do.

          One thing I noticed right away is that they are rather ugly looking! Luckily this doesn't matter as they are hidden by the lamp shades but if you do have them on display then they won't be looking too great!

          When you first turn the light on it takes a while for them to get very bright. It tends to take about 15 minutes or so for them to be bright, it's a gradual change, it's not like you're suddenly sitting in a dull room and then ping it goes bright, it is so gradual that you don't notice it. I only find this frustrating if I want to read my book as sometimes find that the light at first is not bright enough to do so.

          These bulbs are not as bright as ordinary ones but I don't find that this is too much of a problem really. I have soon got used to them.

          The only thing I Have noticed is that they tend to not last all that long. We have had several 'pop' and have to be replaced and this is really quite frustrating. Yes it's cutting down our energy bill but it's not great havig to keep buying more to replace the broken ones with.

          I am glad that we have changed to these as it's good to know we're doing our bit for the energy bill and environment but I am disappointed that they are not as good as usual bulbs.

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            10.11.2012 13:50
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            a great bulb

            ==Phillips Energy Saving Light Bulbs=

            I am terrible for wanting to save money on my gas and electricity bills as I really don't like having to hand over money for these sorts of things and of course the less power we use the more friendly this is to the environment also. I was really shocked to visit my best friend house recently and to look up at her light fitting and see an old classic non-energy saving bulb! I couldn't believe that people would still be choosing to use these bulbs at all! In fact it has been bothering me ever since and I vow next time I go over to take her some of the stash of energy saving bulbs I have in my kitchen cupboard.

            Most of my energy saving new type of bulbs are indeed the Phillips variety. I think this has to do with the fact that I got a lot sent to me free of charge and then they were on some ridiculously cheap special offer somewhere that I filled my cupboards and because these energy efficient bulbs never seem to "go" like the old bulbs used to my cupboard supplies have more or less stayed well and truly stocked up.

            You can really pay anywhere from £1 to £3 for a Phillips energy saving light bulbs and that would depend on a few factors. There are of course higher or lower wattage bulbs to choose from and also the bottom fitting of the bulb can denote a high price tag. For example the standard two pin bulbs are probably the cheapest where as I have to purchase a 3 pin bulb for my old flat as the builders had installed this new three pin socket in order to make sure people chose the energy saving bulbs as three pins only come energy efficient. This single bulb set me back an amazing £15 and I really did shop around!

            The Phillips energy saving light bulbs do seem to be the best and really do last the longest. I don't think I have yet to replace one that has fused on its own accord and these "new" energy saving bulbs have been out for many years now. I do believe that they have actually stopped making the old sort of bulbs although a few shops are still selling the stock that they have left.

            Okay so there area few draw backs when using these energy saving light bulbs like the fact that they take a little while to "heat up" and thus the light is not as strong when the light switch is flipped to when the light has been on 10 minutes or so. This is a pain if you have one of the lower wattage bulbs in place but often I try to get the higher watt energy bulbs so that it is not so dim when you flick the light switch on.

            Another draw back is that a lot of these energy saving bulbs cannot be used with dimmer switches although now I do believe that you can get special energy saving bulbs that will meet this purpose (of course this is where the price hikes up).

            Really these are the only couple of downsides I can think for choosing to use an energy saving bulb over the old style energy suckers. I can however think of a few positive points which certainly in my view outweigh the negatives ten fold. The main factor is SAVING YOU MONEY! Who really wants to pay the electric company hundred of pounds! Not me and if I have to life with a dim light bulb for a few minutes every day then I would much prefer this.

            I am proud to say that our bills are really very low and even with the recent hike in costs we are still better off paying our quarterly bill than signing up to a fixed pay monthly tariff. I make sure lights are off when I leave the room and use only energy efficient bulbs wherever possible. Those light fittings that don't have energy bulbs in only go on if necessary and although people may think this is going a bit over the top I am happy for it to be this way.

            Another great fact in using energy saving bulbs is really that you are not just saving energy to make your bills lower but saving energy to lessen the drain on the environment. If everyone were to be super cautious then the impact that this would have surely would be immense.

            Seeing as these energy saving bulbs have such a long life expectancy, not only are they saving you money when it comes to bills but they are saving you money when it comes to buying and re-buying the bulbs that I seemed to be forever doing when I used the older style energy sucking bulbs. I should think changing to these bulbs will in my life save me hundreds of pounds. Seeing that you can pick up energy savers for more or less the same price as the old bulbs used to be and they last so much longer this really is a great saving!

            The Phillips bulbs can be bought singularly on as I believe I did in packs of 5 which are all individually boxed but held together with some cellophane. I paid around the £2 region for a five pack from Sainsbury's ages ago when they were on a crazily good special offer.

            They are the medium sized wattage at 11 watts which gives an old output of the 60 watt mark. The bulbs have an energy rating scale of A which of course is the best that you can get and are smaller than the bulbs which have a brighter output. They have and 8 year life expectancy and Phillips even guarantee this though unless the bulb decided to die within a year I shouldn't think many people would be sending of their broken bulbs to Phillips to recoup the minimal amount that was paid for them.

            All in all I feel that these Phillips energy saving light bulbs are a real must have in every possible light fitting of the house. They work well and I have never had any problems with them in all the year I have been using them. They are a money saving item that should not be passed over! I think a top score of 5 out of 5 stars and an exceptionally high recommendation is in order.

            I do hope that this has been of some help/interest to you

            Many thanks for taking the time to read.

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              20.09.2011 20:49
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              For simple, no-fuss lighting, it's hard to quibble with these bulbs

              It's rapidly getting to the point where you can't describe energy-saving light bulbs as "the new sort" any more - they've been with us now for quite a few years, and just recently sales of new 60-watt bulbs of the old incandescent type were stopped. Before long these will be what almost everyone thinks of when someone says "light bulb", at least until LED technology improves to the point at which that can take over. Philips' own "Energy Saver" brand is one of the most firmly established, having been in the market almost from the start.

              One of the minor irritations about moving over to these bulbs is that their wattage ratings are different. For example, an 8-watt bulb roughly equates to an old-style 40-watter. 11W is about the same as the old 60W, and 20W similar to a 100W bulb. Most manufacturers appreciate this and add a note somewhere on the packaging to inform customers; Philips achieves this with by the simple and effective method of adding a small old-bulb graphic with "40W" (or whatever) plastered across it. This should be reassuring to those who are only now moving over to these bulbs.

              When they first came onto the market, Energy Saver bulbs were very expensive, and even now they're usually considerably dearer than supermarket own brands. Prices vary enormously as bulbs are a very common promotional item - I've seen these sold for 50p each more than once - but on the whole you can expect to pay £3 or £4 for a Philips bulb, set against perhaps only a pound for some supermarket versions. You really are paying for the brand name here, but although the price differential seems very high at the till, given the lifetime of an energy-saving bulb it doesn't actually make a huge amount of difference in the long run.

              I was given an 8W bulb recently at an energy efficiency fair in Worcester, and that is the one that I have under review in particular. This wattage is most suitable for small lamps, or perhaps rooms like sheds or attics where there is no need for brilliant illumination. I use mine in a little table lamp, and it does very well there. Mine has a bayonet fitting, but I believe Philips also sell them in screw-fit. The bulb is quite a bit smaller than the earliest energy-saving types, which means that the old problem of being physically unable to fit them into many lamps has all but gone. They're still not very attractive to look at, though, with their odd "curved tube" shape.

              For those who don't mind too much about aesthetics, there are several more important considerations. The first of these is of course energy use. It's hard to tell between different brands of these things, as they're all rated A on the EU Energy scale marked on the box. Philips claims a 10-year life, but read the small print and you'll see that this actually means 10,000 hours - meaning you'd have to burn the light for no more than about 2 hours and 45 minutes per day to reach the 10-year figure. Fine for lamps, but the higher-wattage bulbs used for main rooms might well be on for longer than that, so I'd suggest a realistic lifetime of five rather than 10 years for those.

              Talking of small print, the Energy Saver's box is packed with it. Most of this is simply the basics: the aforementioned lifespan, and the warning that (as with most bulbs of this type) they are not suitable for dimmer or electronic switches. You woudn't think this would take up so much space, but Philips have really gone to town with the internationalisation, and the relevant text is provided in no fewer than 30 languages, from Armenian to Slovak. Don't look for English under "UK", incidentally: that's Ukranian! You need "EN". On the base of the box is "Made in P.R.C." - which is, unsurprisingly, the People's Republic of China.

              As with most energy-saving bulbs, the Philips one is just a little bit slow to get up to full speed in terms of luminance. There's a very slight delay between your flicking the switch and the bulb coming on; it's well under a second but is still slightly disconcerting if you're used to the instant response of an incandescent light. Then there are just a few seconds when the bulb isn't quite at full brightness, and for a moment it can seem as though it's going wrong. Don't panic: it gets up to speed pretty quickly, and once there the light is fine. Some people report headaches from this type of bulb, but I've never suffered from that.

              All in all, there's very little wrong with Philips Energy Saver light bulbs. If it weren't for the fact that they're often so much more expensive than other brands I'd be more than happy to give them five stars in spite of their less than elegant appearance. They still rate four with some ease, however, and I've never had one break or go dud on me straight from the box, which is certainly a step up from old-fashioned bulbs! However much some may pine for incandescents, they're increasingly part of lighting history, and it's these things that are the future. It's a good job, then, that Philips made a decent job of this type early on.

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                20.07.2011 12:40
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                Shop around and get a great price

                ** The bulbs I am reviewing here come in the packaging as shown under the Price Comparison tab, not as pictured above **

                Some years back when energy saving bulbs were relatively new (and expensive!), we received some for free through the mail (as I'm sure a lot of households in the UK did) and we started using them straight away. They were these Philips ones. There have since been a lot of excellent offers in shops over the years and you can now get this style of energy saving bulb for mere pennies (though I see this particular one online in Sainsburys currently for over £4! Crazy).

                These 20 watt Philips energy savers emit light equivalent to a 100 watt incandescent bulb, but while using 80% less electricity. This is because no energy is wasted by being released as heat and these bulbs remain pretty cool while in use. What's not to love? They come in a recyclable cardboard box with a picture of the bulb on the front, showing what type of fitting it is (Edison screw (E27) in this case), the wattage, what wattage incandescent it is equivalent to and the lifespan - for these bulbs, 6 years. They have an energy efficiency rating of A, not surprisingly, and the box tells us these cannot be used in dimming or electronic switches.

                When fitting these bulbs, care must be taken to hold the bulb by the base, and not by the glass parts; the bases are large enough that this is not usually difficult. I remember reading that if these types of bulbs break you are supposed to leave the room for a certain amount of time before going back in to clean it up, since they contain mercury, but the packaging states nothing about this. There were also numerous stories about them causing headaches doing the rounds. I have never experienced any problems such as these, and in fact my last puppy pulled one off the worktop once, smashing it. After shooing her out the room I cleaned it up straight away with no ill effects. I had to, as I couldn't keep her away from it.

                I now have these bulbs in every light fitting in the house, and am delighted with them. They can take a few minutes to reach their full brightness, but this isn't a problem and when they do they are great. Really bright just like a regular incandescent. One thing, is that they are an unattractive shape if you have light fittings in which they would not be concealed; I don't have any open light fittings so this isn't a concern of mine, but my mum is bothered by this as all her light fittings have exposed bulbs and currently, the energy saving spots and candles are exceptionally expensive. If they do not drop in price by the time incandescent bulbs are completely phased out there will be a LOT of unhappy people I would imagine.

                I certainly would not pay over £4 for this bulb as alternatives of the very same style and wattage can be had for a tiny fraction of that price (for example, I got a 6 pack of Morrisons brand bulbs for 20p about a year ago!). In these cases, the value is out of this world given how long they last for. To date, I have not had to replace any due to them stopping working. Philips are a known and trusted quality brand, which goes some way to explaining the price. Given their longevity even £4 is good value, it's just a lot to put out at once if you want to buy them for all your lights!

                (((( Just a little extra thought which someone may find useful - I also use these to brighten up dark areas of larger reptile enclosures. Reptiles react to light levels as well as temperatures, and these bulbs allow you to light up without interfering with the desired temperatures, since they do not emit heat. ))))

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                08.03.2011 22:11
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                a good quality bulb but overpriced for the switchover

                I'm sure pretty much everyone's aware of energy saving light bulbs by now, there's even plans to phase out the old "energy inefficient" ones so that soon everyone will have no choice but to have these. Being energy conscious (read as financially conscious!) we bought these Philips energy saving bulbs about 5 years ago now on the theory that they would save us money both in electricity bills and in the cost of replacing light bulbs when they blew.


                Appearance
                ~~~~~~~

                The ones we have have look like three looped bulbs in the shape of a triangle, each loop is around 3 inches long and about an inch wide; even the holder that attaches into the light fitting is 2 inches long so these are pretty large bulbs we're talking about here!


                Claims And Facts
                ~~~~~~~~~~

                Energy Saving light bulbs make some pretty big claims, they claim to be able to save £2.50 per year per bulb in electricity and they claim to be able to last 10 times as long as a normal bulb. (claims taken from http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Home-improvements-and-products/Lighting) so let's take a look at these in turn:

                I obviously haven't worked out exactly how much electricity each bulb has saved us but I have noticed our electricity usage (as measured by one of those fancy electricity meters that tells you exactly how much you're using) has reduced compared to before so although I can't validate the exact amount of savings it is true that they do save you money.

                As for lasting 10 times as long. I'm not sure how long they think the average light bulb lasts but there are two bulbs we put in 5 years ago when we first bought these and they haven't blown yet so they last many years at least. They do however take longer to warm up now then before. I would say now that we wait probably about 3 minutes for them to get to their full brightness, when they were brand new they took around a minute so there is still a reasonable wait for them to warm up even when new.


                Fitting
                ~~~~

                Fitting these into the sockets was very easy. We have the screw fittings and these bulbs screwed in just as easily as the standard ones without any problems. Once in they felt secure and so there are no worries about them being loose or falling out.

                Although we have the screw fittings there are bulbs available to fit the other kinds and I have not heard of any problems with these either although I cannot confirm this with any personal experience.


                But Are They Bright?
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~

                The light produced by these are very bright, even brighter then that produced by a normal bulb although whether this is due to the three filaments rather then just having the one I couldn't say. We have a chandelier type fitting in our living room that used to need three bulbs in order to light the whole room. We currently have only one bulb in that fitting and it is more then bright enough for the room saving us even more money since we only need a third of the lights on!


                They Sound Great - Any Problems?
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                The one other thing I will say is that although I believe you can now get smaller bulbs the ones we have are very large. Throughout the house we have light shades designed to look like flowers, whilst these worked with the older bulbs they don't really have the same effect with these since the holder takes up all the space within the shade and the bulb itself is sticking out the end, the length of them (5 inches counting the holder) also means that they can't be fitted into many lights designed for children's rooms. For instance in my brothers room there is a light shade designed to look like a football, there is no way these bulbs will ever fit in there since there just isn't enough room within the ball itself.


                Pricing, Availability And Recommendation
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                These bulbs are widely available and cost around £6 - £8. Although this does at first seem very expensive for what is at the end of the day just a light bulb they do last forever and they do reduce your electricity bill so I would still recommend them as I feel that over their life time they will pay for themselves. It is worth shopping around though as prices do vary.

                I have knocked off a dooyoo star because of the price despite having said they'll pay for themselves as they are forcing us to convert to energy saving bulbs I do think that's a bit too much to force us to pay!

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                24.01.2011 17:16
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                Energy is a scarce and expensive commodity; we need to use as little as possible

                Even in the relatively short period of time since energy saving light bulbs started to appear in our shops, technology has come a long way and many of the initial concerns expressed about these bulbs have been addressed.

                * We have got used to the unusual and rather unappealing shape, but you can also now get such items with a more pleasing light bulb shaped shape.

                * We hated the fact that these bulbs took ages to achieve their full brightness and never seemed to be as bright as those we had been used to. Although these do still take longer to warm up than conventional light bulbs, there has been a significant improvement and most would now concede that they give equivalent brightness.

                * We had a strong aversion to these when they were first introduced because the claims on longevity were unproven or at least not necessarily believed and they were hideously expensive at the outset. Now we all know that these seem to go on forever and we have all benefited from those very cheap offers on which we will have stocked up on bulbs that we may not use for years.

                * Back in the day, we paid a degree of lip service to energy saving measures. Now that we are more enlightened and energy prices have rocketed, the fact that we can provide equivalent light using over 5 times less electricity has more than a little appeal.

                * The news a little while ago that the old style light bulbs were scheduled to be phased out helped to persuade the Doubting Thomases amongst us. Indeed, the news led to shortages in the shops as people sought to buy up some stock, either to feed their desire to stick with the old or in some feeble attempt to make an unlikely investment in an ever more scarce resource.

                Now, we will shortly have a generation of people who will know nothing other than these energy saving devices. There will come a point that they will no longer be dubbed as being energy saving because they will be the norm.

                Philips has always had a strong position in this market and has hit on a winner with their energy saving bulbs. I have replaced most of the bulbs in our house, the only ones remaining being ceiling lights in the kitchen which are necessarily halogen and some rather old fashioned ceiling lights in the dining room which, when I switch them on, burn 6 x 60 watt conventional bulbs - way too much!

                Unless I have a particular need for brightness, I use Philips 11w bulbs which yield the same light as the old 60W bulbs. (600 lumen) Unlike some bulbs, they are very well packaged and presented such that as a buyer I have confidence that when removed from the protective packaging, it will work. I have no issue with performance and the fact that it is up to a minute before they get to their full brightness is not a problem to me.

                The cardboard outer is strong and inside the close fitting cardboard box the bulb is protected by a further card sleeve. The bulb itself comprises three double loops, each 5.5cms long - a chunky middle section of gubbins into which the bulb is fitted which I guess makes the whole thing work and a final bayonet fitting. The whole unit measures only 11.5cms so they no longer stick out of your light unit and look stupid. You can also get screw fittings and bulbs of other wattages.

                Philips proud claim on the box is they these will last 10 years based on 10,000 hours - an 80% saving. It is testament to the international distribution of the Philips brand that this information is printed in 30 different languages and this one simple claim takes up two full sides of the printed outer. We have a picture of the bulb on the outside front and confirmation of the unit's A energy rating on the reverse.

                I am a convert to these bulbs and trust the Philips brand. I have six of these in stock in one of the kitchen cupboards and I suspect they will be there for a long time to come.

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                  07.09.2009 13:43
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                  Brilliantly bright idea from Philips! :)

                  My mum gets these free from Motability and has done for years, plus we are with British Gas so they send two at a time too so we have loads!

                  'Philips Energy Saver' light bulbs but unlike and any bulb you have seen before in design or in use!

                  The makers of these strange looking bulbs have designed them to use less electricity therefore cut down on the Carbon Footprint we leave on this planet.

                  The one I am reviewing is an 11 watt bulb that transfers into 60watts of power when fully lit up.

                  There are three white glass twisted filament connected to a bulky white base that conduct the electricity from the connection through to the filaments. The bulb feels a lot heaver than normal lightweight glass bulb and is called 'Genie'.
                  Each one comes separately packed in a really compact little box and each bulb is really securely packed inside too - of course everything can be recycled so it good for the environment.

                  You are not to throw these away in the normal garbage as they are dangerous if broken of course, but recycle them. They should to your local tip every so often with any other runs you do...

                  The biggest selling point of these energy saving products is that they are said to last for an average of eight years compared to a normal bulb - that's amazing!!

                  This figure is based on an average of three hour burning time every day and the makers claim these use 5 times less electricity than a normal bulb of the same wattage...not that's pretty cool! :)

                  We have never had to replace a single one yet and we've lived in our home for nearly six years now!

                  There are a few disadvantages of course, the main ones being you can't use with a dimmer switch or an electronic switch and the length of time they take to 'warm up' once switched on. At first when you turn the light on these are really dull and I would say it takes a good two to three minutes to get to full brightness.

                  This can be a problem if you want illumination quickly like to put your makeup on in the bedroom for example.

                  The benefits far outweigh the few disadvantages in my book though...

                  These are Class A in energy efficiency and they are far more economical to buy and run nowadays. When my mum first started receiving them they were pretty dear to buy, but I've seen them for only 10p each now of a pack of ten in Poundland.

                  Everyone should change to these wherever practical, although ours are only the two prongs ones so we can't use them in our screw fitting fixtures.

                  Five stars for an economical way to use electricity that is kinder to planet Earth :)

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                    23.11.2003 19:59
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                    It was 10 years ago that I fitted a simple home device which was to save me money and at the same time help towards the environment. I did not know this when my husband brought home a couple of Philips energy saving light bulbs which he had bought for considerably less than the price at that time. I placed one on the landing and the other above the space which now takes my desk. After a decade of needing only the occasional dust instead of replacement they finally ignited for the last time within a couple of weeks of each other. The promise was for 12 years, burning for 3 hours per day and the ten years I had them proved a promise kept since the one on the landing incorporates a smoke detector, so has to remain on for most of an evening to keep the detector charged. The other is above my computer and as every dooyooer knows we are talking midnight oil. Anyway, knowing that they are such low energy I keep them on. Over 20 years ago new powders were discovered for fluorescent lamps allowing an improved colour and more efficient luminosity. Thus it was that thin glass tubes could be folded into the small fluoerescent lights we have today.* My bathroom light contains something similar to this and, although not advertised as long life, has been glowing for me unreplaced for more years than I can accurately count back. The Philips stick looks like 3 very small fluorescent lights bent over in a U shape and placed side by side below the usual bayonet fitting. Because they are at least an inch longer than the usual oval shaped bulb I do not use them beneath a shallow lampshade. I believe that nowdays normal shaped longlife bulbs are produced but I have kept to the Philips Stick as it has proved its worth. Unlike the usual light bulb which contains a filament attached between electrodes, these are filled with a gas which emits ultraviolet rays causing the coating on the glass to glow. Therefore, light rather than heat is pro
                    duced and up to 5 times less electricity is used than that of a 1000 hour bulb of similar output. I have read that if every family in the United States of America were to use one energy saving light bulb instead of the standard type it would have the same global warming benefit as taking 7.5 million cars off the road. Since the previously excessive price of these has reduced to the £5 for 2 which I paid in Safeway for the replacement bulbs this has to be a very good saving all round, whilst helping the environment. Another interesting point is that the light above my desk is only 20 watts yet effectively illuminates this end of a room 18' 6" in length. With this type of lamp the lesser wattage gives the equivalent of a full 100 watts. I find that when first switched on the glow is rather muted, but soon warms up to its full potential. Incidentally these are not suitable for electronic or dimmer switches. Although I have written to and emailed Philips to ask them if other wattages are available, sadly they haven't deigned to reply. I am told that this type of light is best left on rather than extinguishing whenever a room is left and this suits me. I like to leave a couple of lights on as a security measure when leaving the house of an evening and these fit my choice of location if I wish the house to look occupied without leaving all lights burning. The depth of the Philips stick might not suit those who prefer shallow shades but I don't have an aesthetic problem in this direction. For those who may be concerned about fluorescent "flicker", there is no need to worry. The light given is steady and I don't find it any more white than a normal 1000 hour bulb. The use of these lights and my intention to buy more come at the right time. I have been recently assessing how much money I can save on utilities without being finicky. An application for a water meter and remembering that I no l
                    onger have the indoor plants which needed tropical heat have helped. The addition of longlife light bulbs should satisfy the rest. Although I like the idea that my pocket and the environment are aided by my choice of lighting, best of all is that I can forget that they are there. *Source: http://www.eur.lighting.philips.com/int_en/prof/about/press/company/history1.html

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                  • Product Details

                    An energy saving stick light bulb.