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Wireless Audio/Video Transmitter 100V

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2 Reviews
  • Cannot be used at meal times (microwave inteferance)
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    2 Reviews
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      30.12.2002 21:54
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      • "Cannot be used at meal times (microwave inteferance)"

      Looking for a way to connect the audio output from my DVD to and stream mp3 music files from my pc to my hifi, I came across the 100V. The saleman assured me it would not pick up inteferance from my 802.11b wireless lan. It did. I asked whether the sound reproduction was comparable with wired connection and was told it was. It wasn't. The sound through my Bose speakers was flat and lifeless. Reproduction or lack of at the top range was particularly bad instead of the crispness I have been used to when playing cd's I got hiss. The 100V would not receive through thin walls some 20ft away. Walking between the two units produced inteferance and they were in line of sight. Meal times were the worst of all. The inteferance picked up from the microwave made this device unbearable. In the end I took it back bought 13 metres of cable, a soldering iron, phono inputs and other techno goodies and made a proper job of it. I bought two pairs, could they both have been faulty?? If you must try it you can get it for £39.99 at Maplins

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        29.08.2001 07:55
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        Now here's an interesting thing. Many early video fans will remember a product that surfaced in the 80s called a "Video Sender". This fun little unit promised to take the output from the back of your VCR, transmit it (illegally, as it turned out) on the UHF television band, and then another TV in the house could tune in and benefit from video entertainment. Thus was the theory. However, in practice, the things just did not work. I had a friend who sent off for one (and they cost a fortune in 1988) and was never able to make it go successfully. So when I saw an advance press release for the Trust Audio Video Transmitter, I was at once both intrigued and sceptical. Memories of fruitless evenings spent trying to fine tune the "Video Sender" came back to haunt me. But surely, technology has moved on, right? And with a vengeance. While the Sender of the 80s looked like it might have come out of someone's shed; the 100V looks like it would be at home on the Space Station. In the box are two units, almost identical, which have a plastic "satellite dish" folded down. More on this later. Happily, two power units are provided, so you don't have to worry about joining Tandy's Battery Club. More significantly, however, are the cables and Scart connectors - everything you need is in this box. Fear not, gentle reader, you are to be well looked after. Down to business. The supplied information provided very light reading - and no wonder, as it is deceptively simple to use. It works like this: You connect the transmitter unit to whatever you fancy as the source. This can be, for example, a VCR, DVD player, closed circuit camera or even a PC. Then you hook up the receive unit to wherever you wish to listen/watch the result. This might be a hi-fi, another TV, VCR or PC. Switch on, and sit back. Of course, there is slightly more to it - but they are all pluses. I didn't mention, for exampl
        e, that you can take the remote controls for the source equipment to the receive location and control the playback from there. I also never mentioned that you can add additional receive units - maybe you would like to watch your VCR from every room in the house, or transmit music from your PC to the kitchen and living room. The possibilities for this device are numerous. I have used this product for about a month now, and I have to say, I do like it. I initially put it to work transmitting both the VCR audio and the satellite audio to the office. This was so I could either listen to something interesting (like music from the Easy Channel) whilst working. Later, I set up a talking book on the PC to listen to on the bedroom hi-fi that night. In short, I have tried the 100V in all sorts of permutations, and so far, it has performed faultlessly. Part of the appeal lies in the frequency used for the transmission: 2.4 GHz. The signals go through walls and ceilings, and the quality of both the audio and video received at the other end is faultless - and my house has three floors! The "satellite dish" on each unit are positionable so that the curved surface of each can face each other (through walls, ceilings etc) which means that the signal beam is pencil thin - no chance of your neighbours picking up that errm... late night "art" film you wanted to watch. All in all, a great performing product at a more than reasonable price. If you have ever been burned with a "Video Sender", get your revenge by investing in a 100V.

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      • Product Details

        Set up a wireless link to watch videos or DVD on a second television without cabling. Transfers video images and audio signals. IR extender included to use every existing VCR/DVD remote control. Transmit through walls without interference.