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Wilko Slug & Snail Killer

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4 Reviews

Brand: Wilko / Type: Pest Control

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    4 Reviews
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      25.07.2013 14:08
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      an effective slug and snail killer

      I am pretty sure I will be shouted at by some fellow Dooyooers for using this Wilko's slug and snail killer because it is a cruel way of killing the horrible creatures but I am afraid I have to stick by my guns and advise that this is a last resort. I have recently moved to a small ground floor flat which has no porch and thus anything that lurks outside my front door, more often than not, ends up in my newly carpeted hall. Don't get me wrong, I do enjoy all things nature but the thought of having snails or slugs indoors makes my skin crawl especially as my younger daughter had slugs in her bedroom last year in her rented student house.

      I have tried using eggshells, sand and even the odd drop of beer but still found snail trails close to my entrance so decided I would buy something that would kill them off for certain. In the reduced section In Wilko's I found this slug and snail killer for just £1.50 because the top was damaged - I think it is normally £2.30ish. I have used it 3 times in the past few weeks and have seen no slugs or snails nor trails so hopefully they have gone for good.

      The top has a rigid child-proof cap and I have followed the clear given directions with care because we have a lot of cats visit plus the odd hedgehog and fox and I do not wish them any harm. There are cautions on the bottle too about not using it near children, about storage and disposal too as the pellets contain poison. Apparently they work best when used in damp conditions and in the early evening.

      They are basically bright blue pellets which you are advised to scatter 3-4" apart and I have found that, thankfully, I have not had to use many to deter slugs or snails. I am not sure if they give off some sort of smell which puts them off (?) or whether they have just given up on coming near because there are no dead ones around not any evidence that they have been in the vicinity.

      So, although I feel a bit guilty for using this product, I have to say that I am slug and snail-free and the visiting cats, hedgehogs and fox are still around!

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        25.04.2013 21:11
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        Keep away from pets and children

        Last year we had a go at growing some Strawberries but we found that the leaves were getting eaten so we knew we need some sort of slug pellets. We picked these slug pellets up in Wilkinson's when buying some extra compost, the product is one of Wilkinson's own so can only be bought from there and costs us about £2.

        The product comes in plastic tub which is coloured two different greens and displays a rather yucky slug on the front of it, the lid twists on and off but is childproof which of course is very important with this sort of product. On the back of the tub you have warnings such as these need to be kept away from children and that you should not mix these with water. The product contains 1.5% w/w metaldehyde so should be kept away from pets as well as children.

        To use the pellets you simply sprinkle them on the ground, the pellets are a few mms in length and they are vivid blue so there is no way you could miss seeing where you have used them. We were growing strawberries in a strawberry planter so we moved it around the corner of the house so there was no chance of the Dogs or the children making contact with them.

        The pellets work by poisoning the slugs and snails once they have ingested them, we found that plenty of the pellets disappeared from the planter however we didn't actually find many bodies which surprised me. The leaves of our strawberries weren't eaten once we started to use the pellets which means they were doing their job perfectly however I do think it's a pain not being able to use them where children and pets are as I like to grow my fruit and vegetables in the back garden but this is where the dogs go too so we cannot use them to stop a lot of the slugs, if anyone has any solutions for preventing slugs in your patch feel free to inbox me.

        I will rate these 5 from 5 as they do the job they are meant to do perfectly and I feel they are a decent price too.

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          20.06.2010 13:08
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          Wilko Snail and slug pellets - death comes in a container

          As the country's interest in growing fruit and vegetables in our back gardens rises (or on allotment if you have managed to survive the twenty year waiting lists!), so too is the population of of slime trailing green leaf assasins - slugs and snails. I once saw a episode of River Cottage where the small holders' idol, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall (or "he who kills and eats it all" as I refer to him) made slug fritters, he seriously did. Even more disturbing is the fact that it wasn't just an academic exercise in the potential for slugs as a food source, he went on to eat them. All this was shown before the nine o'clock watershed too.

          Personally, my favourite way of dealing with slugs and snails is to inflict a gruesome, messy death upon them as a twisted form of revenge for the damage they inflict upon the contents of my garden. I take some pleasure in my knowledge that for every dead slug in my yard, there is a lettuce who, if our salad leaf friends could talk, would surely thank me for giving them the gift of life and willingly offer their sacrafice as an addition to my ham sandwiches in their gratitude. When it comes to my battle with slugs and snails, I feel like some green fingered God dispensing justice from his fingertips, or in my case, from the rattle and shake of a plastic container of Wilko's Snail and Slug Pellets.

          I haven't always been a gardening killer, happily scattering toxic bullets of laser blue coloured metaldehyde death onto my soil. To explain the background of the use of slug pellets further, and to qoute Ernie Wise, "here is a story what I wrote":

          "Once upon a time, there was a dooyoo reviewer with a garden. His garden gave him and his family food through the miracle of organic magic. He respected nature for this, and, in return for nature's bounty, he vowed to google "organic gardening" and live his life in accordance with the great oracle's instructions, making sure to show respect for the life of his plants and the important insects that visited them.

          As his vegetables grew, so did his family, and so did the amount of food his family required from the garden. All was going well - salads were eaten, pickles and jams were bottled and potatoes were duly washed, peeled and mashed.

          One year however, there was a great famine in the man's garden - the green shoots of the potato plants appeared then vanished, the lettuce leaves were turned into clumps of bare stalks and the pea plants were destroyed. "Slugs!!!!" shouted the man, and, in his organic way, he tried companion planting, strategically placed beer traps (beer was bought in especially as the man didn't drink very often) and he even tried filling a submerged baby bath with water to attract slug eating toads and frogs.

          None of this put off the slugs, so at great expense he bought some copper tape and also sprinkled crushed egg shells and coffee grounds around his plants to put off his adversary, the slug. Nothing changed, the slugs still came in their Gengis Khan inspired hordes into the damp summers of a Lancashire summer and raped and pillaged his garden.

          His organic / chenical free / wildlife friendly efforts never seemed to stop the slugs or snails, so one day, in great despair, he turned to google for help. This time however, the man came across a dooyoo review for Wilko snail and slug pellets. The review gave the pellets 4 out of 5 stars, stating that full marks couldn't be given as the pellets could harm hedgehogs and toads, but also stated that these pellets were the ultimate nemesis for slugs.

          The man bought some, used them, killed all the slugs and consequently him, his family and his garden all lived happily ever after. The End."

          On a serious note, although I abandoned my green conscience massively by turning to chemical aids, I feel I can justify this and still sleep at night by making sure I perform a daily harvest of dead slugs and snails before any birds, toads etc can eat them and ingest the poison.

          These pellets are extremely effective, and if used sensibly by removing dead slugs before other wildlife get to them, then I see no reason why I shouldn't award the pellets a full five out of five stars. Thanks for reading.

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            26.11.2009 19:09
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            Good but be careful!

            This year like always we were overrun with slugs and snails - yuk!

            My mum is a keen gardener so goes mad at all the damage done to her summer plants which they love to eat :(

            No-one lives next door so the garden is overgrown and the pests must breed like mad in there so she bought this Wilko Slug& Snail Killer which is mini blue pellets for the control of such garden nuisances...

            The pellets come in a huge 800g bottle with a childproof lid as this is a poisonous substance that should be kept away from lids and pets at all times. They cost £2.39 if not on offer.

            There is a nasty tasting animal repellent but it contains Metaldehyde which can kill of eaten it is that toxic...

            The pellets are like tiny grains a couple of millimetres long and are bright blue so you can see where you've sprinkled them.

            My mum has a bad back so I sometimes put them out for her and I put the last lot out at the end of October to get rid of any last pests. I wear gloves and wash my hands after as well as you should.

            The bottle says not to mix with water and that the best time to put them down is on a warm damp evening but not before rain as it dilutes the strength of the pellets.

            They can be used around edible and non-edible plants but care must be taken not to get the pellets trapped in the leaves....

            The pellets need scattering about 3-4 inches apart and are really effective within 24 hours after the slugs and snails have ingested them.

            The pesticide works wonders at killing the pest and they just shrivel up and go hard and are then easy to dispose of in the garden recycling rubbish.

            This is really good stuff but I will deduct a star as they are not safe to use near animals so that isn't good that they are poisonous to animals - so 4 stars for a good product from Wilkinson's.

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