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Yeoman Telescopic Tree Pruner

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£29.99 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
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      12.05.2006 19:29
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      Telescopic tree pruner with saw attachment

      I was in dire need of a tree pruner. I had one (bought on a whim when I saw it at a reasonable - cheap - price). It was telescopic - however, it had jammed after only a few uses (I said it was cheap) meaning that it was no longer telescopic and not much use for what I wanted as it wouldn't reach the heights I required.

      There are quite a number of trees in our garden although I hadn't realised just how many until I started to write this. I have totalled fifteen - not counting two Wisterias, numerous Hazels and a Christmas tree. They have to be kept to a reasonable height and size - some more than others of course. As I mentioned, I had previously borrowed one from our elderly neighbour but, as this was around fifty years old, it was somewhat heavy and awkward, it was also only about six feet long so didn't reach the higher branches and being so heavy was not the ideal tool for wielding at the top of a ladder.

      So, the next step was to buy my own. The first (as I mentioned) was something of a disaster. The idea was good, it was telescopic and lighter than my neighbour's wooden one. However, it jammed and although it was fine for the lower branches it wasn't long enough to reach the higher ones - the ones that really needed pruning!

      I found the Yeoman Telescopic Pruner by means of a newsletter from Gone Gardening. It was totally unexpected but very welcome as it also happened to be a special offer that particular week meaning that it was cheaper than its usual price. In fact, I paid £24.99 which included delivery and a gift of three pairs of gardening gloves in various weights! This pruner (or lopper) had the added incentive of also having a saw attachment (often an optional extra) - although, at that time, I could not see myself using it. How wrong I was!

      The Yeoman Telescopic Pruner was much better quality than the previous one. The normal length including the blade is around 1.5 metres but when fully extended the reach is 2.7 metres. It locks and unlocks with a twist action and, although I am inclined to not turn it too tightly for fear of it sticking, so far it has been very successful. The cutting blade is approximately 8cms and is worked by means of a pulley. This is a curved blade and will cut through quite substantial branches. However, for the thicker or dead wood the saw should be used.

      My first task was to tackle the old Holly tree as for some time this has been blocking the light from part of the garden. I had managed the lower part of the tree before but there was one particular branch just out of reach. There was nowhere to rest a ladder and the problem was, as you might say, growing! This, I thought, was where the saw attachment might be useful. The saw itself is approximately 35cms long and is really simple to attach. I found that with the pruner fully extended I could reach the branch from the ground. The whole operation took a matter of minutes - and I didn't even drop the branch on my head - which has been known to happen! So far this has been the only time I have used the saw, but I have seen other places where it will come in handy. I should perhaps add that the offending branch was about 8 or 9 cms in diameter.

      For the most part the ordinary blade will suffice as it is, after all, for pruning trees not felling them. My family would probably disagree with this as they tend to think I am unstoppable once I get started!

      Generally speaking, this tool is ideal for anyone who has trees in the garden as, sooner or later, there will be something that needs trimming or shortening or cutting out. I have found it to be a very useful item and it will be in full use in the coming weeks when the fruit trees have to be pruned.

      I hope this has been of interest, and I thank you for reading.

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