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Golfers Club Air Practice Balls

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11 Reviews

Type: Practice Golf Balls

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    11 Reviews
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      22.09.2011 11:28
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      Ideal to use within the confines of your garden.

      I have an old set of golf clubs in the shed that I occasionally drag out to knock a ball around the garden. The only problem is that my garden isn't quite big enough to allow me to take a full on swing at a proper golf ball to practice my game (unless I want to take out a few windows and the odd fence panel in the process!). And trying to find a decent field or park nearby without people or animals in the way, and with some fairly decent level ground, is very difficult, when all I want to do is just knock a ball around and refine my golf swing.

      Then someone told me about these Practice Golf Balls. To be honest, I have seen them many times before, but never really thought that they would be any good, and merely dismissed them as a sort of plastic toy for a kid's golfing set. But eventually, I did venture out and bought a set of 12 from Amazon for £7.99 about a year ago, although I note nowadays that the price has gone down to £5.99 for 24.

      What do you get? Well basically it is a small white plastic hollow ball, full of large holes. May not look much, but there has been a lot of design ingenuity gone into the making of this little ball. For starters, being made of plastic makes it very cheap and light weight, meaning that you are not going to be too worried about losing a few, and it shouldn't really have any damaging affect if it strikes a window, yet the plastic is tough enough to be able to take a full hard whack from a golf club without breaking or splitting, meaning that you can use it again and again. But the really clever bit is that the ball is full of large holes, which aren't just there to save weight. The purpose of these holes is to give the ball the aerodynamic characteristics of a brick, meaning that when you actually hit the ball really hard, it's not going to go for miles into the distance, but merely go off for about 20 yards maximum because all the flight for the ball has been destroyed by these holes. The beauty of this is that you can now use these balls to practice a full power swing in the confines of your own garden, and not worry about it shooting off into the distance, or breaking any windows.

      In use, I found it initially to be a little bit of a confidence test to see if these holes really did stop the ball shooting off into the distance. At first I just started some gentle swings at the ball with an iron to see how it went, but before long I was taking full power swings with a driver, and the ball would fall down about 20 yards away. Once I got that confidence that the ball wasn't going to damage anything or fly off, I started to practice my stroke and you find that these balls react much in just the same way as a normal golf ball. So you can slice, strike etc and get roughly the same result, meaning that you can then work on improving your golfing technique. The only minor point of note is that, with them being so light, they can easily get caught by the wind. Not too much of an issue, but you just need to be aware when you are practicing in wind that the ball can start doing some strange curves and angles when the wind is blowing.

      In summary, whilst these weren't something that I would have even considered in the past, I am now totally hooked on them to practice my golf swing. Cheap, light weight and ingeniously designed, once you get your confidence with them, you will find that they behave just like a real golf ball, but within the confines of your garden. Hence, a 5* recommendation.

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        14.09.2011 13:16
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        A useful tool to improve your game

        I really enjoy a game of golf, with a few friends or members of my family, but I rarely get the chance to play, due mainly to work commitments, and partly due to the weather, but I do tend to squeeze in a couple of games each year. When it comes to practicing, I also struggle to find any time to head off to the driving range, and so the only little bit of practice I get (aside from playing a round on the course) usually consists of playing around with the odd gadget or gizmo at home that I have accumulated over the years.

        My box of white air practice balls are often what I turn to if the weather is decent, and I have a bit of spare time at home in the garden. They are basically round white plastic balls, sized the same as a golf ball, but made from plastic, and they contain lots of large holes in them which are designed to stop the ball from travelling very far when they are struck with a golf club. This is important for these balls, as it enables the user to strike the golf ball in the same way that they would on a golf course, but eliminates distance and so in turn damage to the house and garden!

        I purchased a box of 12 of these balls from Amazon a few years ago, and I think I paid about £4 - £5 for them. Currently they are available on Amazon for just £5:99 (including free delivery) for a box of 24 balls.
        This is a very cheap price considering the huge price that would be associated with buying a box of 24 real golf balls, which often go missing really quick (in my experience!!).


        ~~~ My experience with the air practice balls ~~~

        Having purchased a box of 12 balls originally, I still have 10 of them left, all of which are still in a good condition. The 2 that I no longer have just simply disappeared over my garden fence, and off into a neighbours back garden never to be returned (probably because the neighbours probably had no idea which garden they had come from).
        This possibly gives the impression that these balls cover quite a long distance, but that is not really the case. My garden is very small, and almost every ball that I have hit over the last few years generally only travels perhaps 3 - 4 meters in distance. This is altered occasionally if the wind gets behind a ball, and can give it quite a boost, so it is probably best to use these balls on days that are not too windy.

        I mainly use the air practice balls with my pitching wedge, and high irons, to help practice my swing, and my contact with the correct part of the golf ball. However these balls can be used with any club really, including drivers, and can be used on the ground or from a golf tee.

        It is difficult to conclude when a practice ball has been struck really well, as they do not travel very far, and they do wobble about in the air even in a light breeze. However, I do feel that my game does benefit from the use of these balls in my back garden, as there is no doubt in my mind that my swing has improved a little, and I am striking the golf ball in a better position, meaning that I don't get as many balls bobbling along the ground any more, like I used to get a lot due me topping the golf ball quite regularly.

        Overall for the price they are a useful practice tool for anyone who struggles to find the time (or the money) to regularly head off to the driving range to practice their swing. They are cheap, and will last a while, but are not really worth bothering with on a windy day.


        Thanks for reading.


        © L500589 2011

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        30.07.2011 03:28

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        great price for a great way to practice your swing

        If you have a decent sized garden these are a great addition to your golf collection. forget about visits to the driving range, plonk one down on the grass, give it a whack and watch it soar in the air for a few seconds. if one goes wayward, no worries, they would never break a window and if it his somebody, it probably would be as hard as throwing it to them. although they are plastic, they are very strong. havnt broke one yet and like to use them probably once a fortnight. they have definetly improved my game. sure they dont go 250 yards but you can tell when you hit them sweet. they are great for working on your approach play. they are also handy indoors during the winter put one on your door mat and chip them down the hallway. if you have a kid you can rest assured there will be no broken windows.

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        29.07.2011 23:50
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        A golfer's essential kit

        I got into golf two years ago when I got married and was given as a gift a round of golf at the 18 hole course in the country estate where I held my wedding reception. One of the first things any learner golfer will use is a practice ball and I used (and still use) the Golfer's Club Air Practice Balls.

        The idea behind the practice balls is that they are far far lighter than an ordinary golf ball, being hollow and with holes cut into the plastic. This reduces the distance they are able to travel due to their light weight and the drag caused, meaning that they are great for practice in areas where you have restricted space (and even if they do hit something, it will just bounce right off and not cause any damage - great if you hit a window!)

        The balls are white, so easy to find in the rough (and let's face it, as a learner, they will end up there!). They're suitable for use with any type of club - wood, iron, wedge and putter - for practice shots. I don't know how I would have managed without them! Most clubs sell them or have use of them during lessons but they are very cheap to buy too - currently £5.99 delivered for a box of 24 from Amazon.co.uk.

        They've really improved my game in terms of swing, accuracy and shot travel as I am able to put in more real practice at home rather than being restricted to my lessons / amateur games. I do feel more confident on the green now I have put in this extra practice, and for the money they're absolutely essential for the learner golfer. They're also safer to use at home as if an animal manages to locate and swallow one they are less of a hazard than a solid ball (though it's not recommended either way).

        If you are an amateur golfer or thinking of taking up golf (or maybe a long time player interested in improving their golf at home) I can highly recommend the Golfer's Club Air Practice Balls as part of your starter set - you will save time and money as you won't need to use up green time on practice you can do at home. I highly recommend them and will award them a five out of five as they're well made, easy to use and very well priced. A great practice product for any golfer.

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        27.07.2011 23:05
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        average product

        Intro
        ------
        The sport of golf is something which everyone knows is incredibly difficult to master, leaving you frustrated almost every time you play, at what could have been had you played a number of shots differently. To try and aid your pain, there are a number of different options available to you. You can either head down the course or head down the range, but both of those options require time and effort. On the other hand, you can buy some air practice balls and head into your garden and try and make the biggest divots you can and ruin your fathers pride and joy (oh no, thats just me). Therefore, in theory, great idea - but do they work? no!!!


        The product
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        So then, to the product. The balls are made out of a plasticy type of material and have a series of holes in to help them fly through the air. You get 4 or 5 in a pack and you can chuck them out in the garden and whack them around. However, in my opinion, it doesn't really feel like the real thing, you are simply hitting a plastic ball around with your golf club. The ball does not travel far enough for you to know if you have hit it well, or whether you have it with draw or fade. The balls also doesn't travel in an accurate manner so it is very difficult to deduce if you have hit a good shot. Basically, they allow you to practice hitting the ball, which is very basic golf, if you are beyond that level, im not sure that they are for you.


        Durability
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        On the plus side, these are very durable, they are easy to whack around and the ones i have at home were purchased by my parents yonks ago, and they still work as they were designed too. They have been smacked around the garden on numerous occasions without much damage at all. A definite plus.


        Price
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        The other good thing about the product is the price. In comparison to a round of golf or hitting balls down the driving range they are very cheap and can be picked up for just a few quid.


        Summary
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        A good theory and a good idea for the beginner golfer - a little bit immaterial when you get good though! Get down the range!

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          18.07.2011 12:29
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          Would recommend to beginners.

          I got into golf back when i was in college, I'd had a good miniature golf game and thought this was the sport for me because not much energy was required, similar to snooker and darts. I started practicing on the shooting range and was pretty bad at golf itself. It took me a couple of months of practice to be able to hit the ball consistently, and at certain targets although my aim was still pretty bad at times. I bought these practice balls to fix my aim, these cost me a quid for 6 from my local shooting range.

          It does take a few shots to adjust to these because they don't travel much but then again they aren't meant to. The shooting range is a bad place to practice with these so i went down to Roundhay Park which was the best place as living in Leeds I don't have much of a garden. These are made from a lightweight white plastic and are completely hollow inside, they have holes in various places in order slow down the speed so that you can practice your control and spin techniques.

          After using these for a few months I can definitely see an improvement in my game. I wasn't that good to begin with though so if you are quite good at golf these may not do much for you. You do realise that golf isn't all luck though, you can control the ball to some extent if you take into account the wind and then compensate for it. These balls are more prone to the wind then real golf balls, but you can apply the same principle to some extent and your then relying less on luck and a bit more on skill.

          I still have a lot to learn but these have helped, so overall i would recommend these to any beginners just starting out.

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          23.06.2011 21:49

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          Good

          How annoying is it when you want to get down to the driving range but simply cant... well here is your answer. These golf balls allow you to practice your driving and pitch shots in your own garden, without the danger of smashing windows or injuring people. They still travel, dont get me wrong, but the lightweight balls with holes in will only travel 10-30 yards, also meaning you dont have to go and collect them from a mile away!

          They cost me £5.50 for a 24 pack, and although i have already lost a few, they are still exremely good and very durable. The balls allow you to practice without travelling to your nearest course, and you can even practice indoors if you want! I often play very small shots from my carpet onto my bed. I haven't any ornaments in my room, but if i did, they would be safe from these very lightweight balls!

          They are brilliant for learners, or anyone who wants to polish off their game. Overall an excellent product!

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          12.06.2011 21:36
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          useful but not a great help

          Golf Club air balls are balls which are advertised as golfing aids, they are advertised as allowing a player to practice in areas where a hard golf ball would cause damage. They are the same size as golf balls but they are hollow, made of plastic and have holes in their outer shell, they are designed to mimic the feel of hitting a golf ball but only travel a few feet and whatever they hit, they shouldn't cause any damage.

          That's the idea but in truth they have limited use, they are very light and don't travel very far, whilst that can be a good thing if your practicing in a small area. The feeling of getting little feel for the golf shot through the distance and trajectory of the ball takes the pleasure of practicing golf away and leaves little to make the hitting of the ball a fun thing.

          So why would you buy them? Well they can be useful if you having a reasonable sized garden because a full bloodied smack with a golf club does cause these balls to fly further than you think. They allow you to get a feel for the shots and practice your swing, they give a chance to hit a few balls because a ball contact on the ball will cause them to fly off in the wrong direction or to top the ball.

          So for relatively little, usually a pack of five cost a pound at most they can be used to practice golf in an enclosed space. They aren't the best for indoors, because unless your practicing chipping or putting then most peoples rooms are too low to allow a full swing of the club but can be useful outside. The best use of the balls is to set up a bucket or target a reasonable distance away and aim to hit the bucket or target.

          A fun toy really not a golfing aid in my opinion.

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          06.06.2011 15:52
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          Not a bad option but probably not what will help most people.

          Golf is a lifelong game, the hours of practice required to get to any decent standard are phenomenal. Unfortunately not everyone can give up the time needed to get to the driving range or their local golf course, and hitting full weight golf balls in your back garden can lead to some very angry neighbours! Thankfully the good people at Golfers Club have come up with a solution. Their Air Practice balls are essentially plastic shells the same size as a regulation golf ball but owing to their light weight they will not travel half as far as their full bodied cousins.

          A packet of 12 practice balls can be got for about £4 or £5, a bargain considering the price of some of the Nike and Titleist balls out there today. And to be honest, unless you accidentally step on one of the balls (I've done it 4 times now) you won't be renewing them in a hurry. I would definitely say they're worth the money and at the very least are worth investigating if you're caught for practice space at your house.

          Using the practice balls is the same as any golf ball, just plop it down on the grass or a tee and take aim. Thanks to the hollow construction they only fly about four feet before coming to a graceful stop on the ground. Any type of club works with the ball, allowing you to practice with your sandwedge all the way up to a driver.

          While the balls are well made and cheaply advertised they do have a significant drawback. The tactile feedback from the ball is next to nothing on impact and you can't really judge the straightness of your shots seeing as how the wind catches the ball almost immediately. It's an interesting concept no doubt but I'm left wondering if I'm just sitting there swinging at a ball and not getting any better. I've found it reasonably useful for practicing my shorter irons but haven't seen any real improvement in my long game. This could be down to my own ineptitude though so maybe don't take it too seriously!

          At the end of the day this product only costs a fiver and will probably help you with your golf game, and at the very least will keep you entertained as you take practice chips in your living room! Buy it but don't expect miracles.

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          10.05.2011 16:40
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          Not Much Good

          One of the problems of golf is that to really practice the sport you need a large area. Unless of course you are practicing your putting, you need a wide open space where you can hit the ball long distances. When I was growing up I had a small garden which I did sometimes use to chip in but I never had any where to hit the ball hard. Smashing a rock hard little golf ball around in a small garden is not a good plan, especially when your garden is surrounded by windows and nearby green houses. This is where the Club Air Practice Balls come in.

          The Golfers Club Air Practice Balls are simply little plastic balls with holes in. They are very light and are designed to be a similar size to a golf ball. If you hit one of these as hard as you can with a driver, chances are you won't get it more than twenty yards. So in theory these balls would be ideal for smashing into a sheet or something in your back garden. Or if you have a big garden you could just smash them around all day without having to worry about the windows.

          I bought a pack of six of these balls many years ago. I thought as these were practice balls they would be ideal for using in all forms of the practice game, chipping, putting and even driving. So when I got these I gave them a try hoping them would help me practice my game. First up I tried to use them for putting. The first problem you have is a pretty obvious one, they are far to light. If you are used to putting a standard ball they feel completely different and react in a very different way. You also find that they don't roll straight. If you putt outdoors they blow around even in the lightest of winds. The main issue I have for using these for putting practice is that it completely messes up your putting rhythm. When you switch back to standard balls it is really hard to adjust.

          Then I tried using these for chipping. To be honest I think chipping was the most effective use of these balls, but yet again there were problems. I used to use these outside in the garden for chipping, the wind always played havoc with them. Again the feel of the balls was all wrong, you have to hit them far harder than you would a standard ball so it really confuses your perception of a shot. When chipping normal balls again it is hard to get used to the way they react. So really I found chipping these did more harm than good.

          Finally if you use these for driving or just pitch shots. Quite simply the balls are not up to taking a real pounding with a driver. The fact is they are poorly made little bits of plastic, so they are not going to stand up to being smashed with a Taylor Made Burner. If I hit these as hard as I would a normal ball I found they soon smashed and then were useless. Maybe these balls are not designed for this purpose so it's a little harsh to complain on this front, but even so, it's another area you can't use them for practice.

          A 24 pack of these will set you back around £6. So at about 25p each they certainly won't sting your pockets. However, I really didn't see any practical use for these balls and gave up on them pretty quick. Some people may well find a use for them and I suppose if all your doing is practicing your swing and making contact with a ball, they could be used for that. Overall though I can't say these really did it for me.

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            10.05.2011 00:28
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            Golf practice aid

            NOBODY has EVER mastered the sport of golf - even Tiger Woods occasionally finds himself amongst the bushes with his balls in awkward locations (!), and back in his heyday, the legendary Jack Nicklaus could sometimes hit the odd duffer. However, the more you practice, the closer you'll get to perfection - and there are hundreds of training aids on the market each one promising to make you a better player.

            In my opinion the simplest training products are often the best - and this is certainly the case with Air Practice Balls - these white plastic spheres allow the practice of your ball striking without the need for a huge garden.

            Price & Use
            - - - - - - - -
            Costing £5.99 for a pack of twenty-four, the balls are of regulation size, but they're hollow inside and adorned with a series of large holes. They're great for pitching practice, and you can even use them indoors - I've often found myself chipping from the carpet onto the sofa without the risk of any smashed ornaments or windows.

            In the garden these balls are perfect; you can hit a full golf shot, and they'll only travel twenty yards or so - even if you did hit one over the neighbour's fence, it would be unlikely to do any damage considering the fact that it's extremely light. The balls are especially useful in ironing out kinks from your game - for example, if you're a slicer of the ball - the air balls will similarly display a left to right shape, albeit on a smaller scale.

            Final Word
            - - - - - - -
            Overall I would highly recommend air balls as a safe and enjoyable way to practice your striking - they're great for kids who are learning the game for the first time, and similarly good for the more experienced player who is looking for that extra bit of consistency out on the course. You don't even need a garden to use them in - just don't take any divots out of the carpet!

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