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Maxfli Revolution

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3 Reviews

The unique multilayer construction delivers unbeatable distance for tee shots and Tour-caliber spin and feel for approach shots. The soft urethane cover provides tremendous feel and cut and scuff resistance not found in other performance golf balls.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
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      07.08.2011 22:00
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      Perfect ball for a mid handicapper

      Although they're not featured in Maxfli's newest range of golf balls, the 'Revolution' has slowly become a favourite with mid-handicap club players. There are a few different types of Revolution ball available, and today i'm taking a look at the 'Revolution Solid' variety which offer maximum distance and a solid feel (hence the name). In terms of the price, I've picked up a dozen of these bad boys for £14 in the past, putting them in the realms of the mid-cost ball - you can also buy two dozen of them in AAA grade used condition for £16.99 from a variety of online retailers.

      Feel & Durability
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      From the point of view of feel, the Revolution Solid features a rather long-windedly named 'Iotek Ionomer Cover' which, in non-techno-babble, simply means that it feels a bit softer than many of the other distance balls on the market. It's nice to have a little softness from the clubface (especially when putting), as some balls i've used in the past (take a bow Top Flite XL) feel almost rock hard. Designed to be cut resistant, the ball's cover is moderately durable - it will last to an extent, but will be a little scratched after a few rounds.

      Distance & Spin
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      The distance of the Revolution Solid is pretty standard for a ball in its particular class - I haven't noticed much difference between it and the similarly priced Titleist Solo. The marketing blurb describes the ball as having a "Wind Shearing dual radius dimple design" - which means little apart from the fact that you may notice slightly deeper dimples. These are used to promote a higher and longer carrying trajectory - and in practice the ball's flight is nicely suited to my game. There's evidence of a little spin on soft greens from shots hit in with a wedge (120+ yards) - however, you'll notice when pitching and chipping that the spin levels are nowhere near as high as Titleist's pricier ProV1 flagship balls.

      Final Word
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      Overall, although they don't excel in feel, spin, or distance, i'm always happy to use Maxfli's Revolution Solid ball as a reliable all round performer. There's probably not enough spin for the low handicappers, but these reasonably priced balls are perfectly suited to the mid handicap club player who wants value for money - recommended.

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      • More +
        26.05.2011 12:20
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        An Average Ball

        I have recently been playing quite a bit of golf. It's a sport I have enjoyed for a long time and play as often as I can, which usually means not very often at all. If you have read any of my recent reviews you will notice I have done a few golf ball reviews. I am one of those golfers who can rarely settle on any one ball. I just tend to use what I get given, what I find, or what ever balls are on offer in the shops. That means I've used quite a few different balls over the years. So when I spotted the Maxfli Revolution balls on the Dooyoo list I thought I should probably give them a review.

        I think it must be around ten years ago when I first used a Maxfli ball. I actually found one and as it looked in new condition I started playing with it. To be honest it wasn't really anything all that special, it was just a run of the mill ball that seemed decent enough. A few years later a ball a small pack of these, I think it was only a tube of three balls but they were going cheap at the checkout so I thought I'd pop them in my basket. These balls were indeed the Maxfli Revolutions. These balls have been around for quite a few years, Maxfli do seem to bring out new improved versions of the ball from time to time, but generally they are all pretty much the same.

        So, what can I tell you about the Maxfli ball? Well it's small, round, hard and white. But I am guessing you already new that. The Maxfli ball is supposed to give you extra distance, hence the name Maxfli or Maximum Flight. Although I do get a reasonable distance out of these balls I would not say I get any extra distance. I would say there are other balls on the market that fly further. They have a reasonable feel to them, they make a nice crisp sound when they ping of my driver, but again, there are other balls that I prefer in this regard.

        I would say that the balls seem to be quite durable. As you use a golf ball it will start to get damaged, the Maxfli ball seems to last a little longer than some balls I have used. Again though I would not say it's the most durable ball I have ever used. When you hit the Maxfli ball it does stay hit, meaning it flies straight and true, as long as you have played a good shot that is.

        Price wise I would say these are about middle of the road. On average you will be looking at paying around £1 per ball, you may find them slightly cheaper if you shop around a little bit. So for value I would say they are no to bad, they are a good quality ball at a fair price and as they are quite durable they tend to be decent value. Overall though I would say these are not my favourite ball. I would use this one if there was little else in my bag, but there are quite a few other balls I would choose ahead of this one. So some people may use this ball and find it is ideal for their needs, but for me it does not quite make the overall grade. A good ball but not what I would class as a great ball.

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        13.02.2003 07:16
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        ~ ~ Ever since they first came on the market back in the early 1980’s, the ‘mad cabbie’ has been playing balata golf balls. A balata golf ball is made with a soft balata rubber cover, with an interior that is ‘wound’, which means that if you were to cut through the outer layer than you would find a huge length of what is basically a very long elastic band, wound round a soft inner core. The balata golf ball, which most manufacturers produce these days, is the ball chosen by about 99% of all professional golfers and low handicap amateurs, for the simple reason that it is softer than solid golf balls, and thus allows you to achieve more backspin on your iron shots, and to fade and draw (move from right to left and vice versa) more easily. The reason this is more easily achieved with a balata ball as compared to a ‘one piece’ solid ball, is that the balata stays on the clubface of the golf club fractionally longer at impact, thus allowing the grooves on the clubface to have more effect. ~ ~ But the balata golf ball also has its drawbacks. A one-piece solid golf ball is virtually indestructible, and will take all sorts of punishment and beating without losing its shape, whereas the softer balata ball doesn’t take to rough treatment at all well, and will distort and cut very easily. Because the balata ball is softer, it doesn’t ‘bounce’ of the clubface with such venom, which means that it doesn’t travel so far as a solid golf ball. And because it spins more in the air, it doesn’t roll so far on landing. When you are a young fit fella like Tiger Woods, then this doesn’t matter that much. He hits the golf ball such tremendous distances that a few yards lost distance is mostly insignificant. But as the years start to creep up on you, and the old body isn’t just as flexible as it used to be, then the first thing that really begins to suffer in most golf
        er’s game is the length they can hit the golf ball. You simply can’t generate the same amount of club head speed at impact as you were once able to. I know that this is certainly the case with me. Nowadays I would say that I hit the golf ball about 30 yards less (on average) than I did when I was in my golfing prime in my late twenties and early thirties. You can overcome this drawback (to a certain extent) by purchasing the latest golf club equipment, where HUGE advances have been made in the last decade or so, thanks mainly to the use of CAD. (computer-aided design) You can also achieve extra distance by using a one-piece solid golf ball. But to be honest, I always felt like I was hitting a stone when I played with one of these, and the lack of “feel” and spin always put me off using them. ~ ~ But just recently I think I might just have come across the solution to my problem! It’s a new golf ball (well, relatively new) called the ‘Maxfli Revolution’. I first heard about it when one of the Sky Sports commentators happened to mention that a number of the top professionals had began to use it in preference to the balata ball, as it was giving them extra distance without sacrificing spin and feel on their iron shots. So the next time I was in ‘Nevada Bob’s’ (my local golf superstore) I purchased a sleeve of three to try them out. The Maxfli Revolution is different in that it combines the best features of both a balata ball and one of a solid-piece construction. It has a solid centre, but this is then surrounded by various different layers of both elasticated rubber and solid material, and finally finished off with an outer skin of Urethane. (not quite so soft as balata) Maxfli claim that it is as long as a solid-piece ball of the tee. I can’t go along with that entirely, but I would say that it has probably given me an extra 10 to 15 yards. And I agree with thei
        r claim that it is as easy to spin as a balata ball, and to draw and fade. I haven’t noticed any difference whatsoever when I attempt to put spin on the ball, and if anything, I think it probably lands softer on the putting surface with a well hit pitch. It’s a durable ball as well. I’m getting at least two complete rounds out of each ball now, whereas with the balata it would be rare if I managed to finish the round with the same ball I started out with. Although it still cuts and scuffs more easily than a solid-piece ball. I wouldn’t recommend this ball to a high handicap golfer though, as it is too soft, and they would end up cutting or marking it badly with their first badly struck shot. But it is an ideal compromise to the softer balata ball for the low to mid-handicap golfer. ~ ~ Pricewise it’s about on a par with the balata. I paid €11 for the first sleeve of three balls that I purchased, but since then I have been buying them by the dozen for about the €36 mark. If you were to shop around on the Web, you would find various (mostly American) sites where you could buy them even cheaper. About $25 is the best price I came across at various different sites. (Just type in the name of the ball in Google) But by the time you add in the carriage it usually isn’t worth your while, as sometimes delivery from America can be very slow. Highly recommended by the ‘mad cabbie’. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Copyright KenJ ~~~~~~~~~~~~

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