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Srixon Soft Feel Golf Balls

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£14.99 Best Offer by: ebay.co.uk See more offers
9 Reviews

With the 333 dimple pattern and Rabalon® Cover, the Srixon Soft Feel incorporates tour proven performance in a low compression ball for the everyday golfer. First, the new Soft Feel features the softest Energetic Gradient Growth core ever designed. It promotes ideal high launch angle and low spin launch conditions for all golfers, while the low compression gives great feel and velocity to those with low swing speeds. The highly resilient Rabalon® cover, which is 25% more resilient than iomer, provides greater energy transfer for more velocity. The seamless 333 dimple pattern lets the Soft Feel stay in the air longer for greater carry, more roll, and more distance.

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    9 Reviews
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      27.01.2014 00:30

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      Perfect ball for short hitters!

      Since being able to get round a golf course in decent figures, I have always used Srixon Soft Feels. Even though I went with Pro V1s for a while, I went back to these.

      The reason being is that a perceived weakness of this ball is actually a strength. It does not get much back spin which many low handicappers like. However although I am a lower handicapper, I do not hit the ball very far and therefore the top spin that this ball generates is beneficial for someone like me.

      It is also a great ball to use in spring and summer if you like fast greens. In spring you can put like you are in summer as the soft feel tends to come hotter and quicker off the face than a conventional golf ball would and in Summer the greens feel extra quick which I personally love.

      Considering I have used this golf ball since being off 18 and now am off 3, I feel that any handicapper could use it and its reasonably priced

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      15.08.2011 11:35
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      A Decent Ball If You Like Soft Feel

      I have been writing quite a few golf reviews in recent months here on Dooyoo. I have also been writing quite a few golf ball reviews. To the untrained eye a golf ball is just a small white object designed to be smashed round a golf course. However, there is so much more to golf balls than that. To someone who never plays the game they would probably all feel the same, but when you play on a regular basis as I try and do you notice subtle differences in different balls. Thus you have certain makes and models of balls that you like and you also have ones you don't really like. So for this particular review we are going to be taking a closer look at Srixon Soft Feel golf balls.

      Srixon are quite a well known make when it comes to golf balls. Often when you see the pros hitting balls they are using Titleist, Callaway or Nike, but there are a few who will still use Srixon. Srixon are a company who are constantly looking to improve the standard of their balls and move with the advancement of technology. While they are not really at the upper end of golf ball makers they still produce good quality balls on a fairly regular basis.

      So what exactly do you get with these ball? Well you may be confused by the name 'soft feel' as these are just as hard as any other golf ball. If this whacks you on the back of the head it certainly won't feel soft! What soft feel basically means is that when you hit the ball it feels softer, you don't get that sharp thwack sound that some balls give you. These still give you a very good length to your drives and they also have quite a high trajectory but they feel different to some balls.

      The designs of this ball state that it has 328 dimples which gives it a greater surface area thus making it more aero dynamic. I'm not really sure how that works but I will say this ball does fly a long way and it does stay straight if you hit it correctly. When I use these I do find them to be quite good balls but not quite as long as some on the market. The high trajectory is something I like as it seems to give you better control around the greens. I'm not overly keen on the sound these make as they fly of my driver, that is probably to do with the fact they are soft feel.

      I have had one of these in my bag for around two years now. It seems to be quite a durable ball as it has held up pretty well. You can buy a dozen of these balls for around £12 which makes them around a pound per ball which is not to bad. Although you may be able to pick them up even cheaper if you shop around a little bit. Value wise they are pretty good, they last well and are a decent price.

      Overall then the Srixon Soft Feel golf ball is a very good ball but not quite good enough to be one of my favourites. It does have a good distance and no doubt some people will really enjoy the soft feel of the balls, but that is not really something that suits my game. This ball will possibly suit players who are new to the game who struggle controlling their golf ball round a course. If you want a ball that does what you want it to more often than not then this is a good shout. So a good ball but not really one for me.

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      09.08.2011 13:54
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      Good quality product

      Intro
      ------
      Back to golf balls we go, probably inspired by the beautiful round i have just completed in the sunshine down at my local club. Today, both me and my mate needed balls so we halved a pack of 12 of these, as our club had an offer on them for just £6. At just £3 for 6, these are an utter bargain. I do not usually play with Srixon products, they are all about technology, as evidenced by the 'soft feel' nature of these balls and the technology behind them. My game is all about hard hitting tee shots, and these don't claim to give me any advantage here, but instead around the green, which is why i have never bought them before. However, after playing 18 holes i was pleasantly surprised. They did the job, and certainly for the price were extremely good, but they are not spectacular, and will not compete with the best balls on the market, the Pro V1, for example.


      The balls
      -----------
      Length - This is the area that ensures that i avoid this ball. The soft feel means that they have a slightly softer outer edge, which gives you greater feel, but at the expensive of distance. However, i did expect the distance shortcomings to be far larger than they actually were. I found that i was still able to drive the ball at about the same range as i do with a normal ball, whilst being probably a few yards short to my shots hit with a pro v, for example. I found this both off the tee and with long irons, so it definitely does compromise length, but not too badly.

      Feel - The area this ball excells. The soft outer ensures that the feel when pitching and chipping around the green is superb. It allowed me to have real confidence when chipping the ball, and avoid shanks and horrifically pulled shots, which would usually happen at least once in a round. Obviously a big plus point, particularly if this is a strength of yours already, as these would really allow you to capitalise on that, i think!!!

      Spin - Again, slightly compromised by the softer outer. The spin generated on the ball is similar to that of a normally priced top flite, or something similar, which are designed for medium level golfers. I expected that this would again be compromised more, but some spin was possible, however it was inferior obviously to that of a better ball, such as a Pro V.

      Durability and Price - Obviously i cannot really comment on durability yet, but the balls i bought today have held up well, as you would expect. In fairness though, Srixon are a great company, and i would doubt you will have any quality issues.
      As for price, they are currently on amazon for £1 a ball, which is quite reasonable, given the quality.


      Summary
      ------------
      A very good golf ball for those that have a strength around the greens and do not mind compromising on length.

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      14.05.2011 14:46
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      A good golf ball but not worth the money for a player of my low standards

      When it comes to golf, I'm very much a 'casual seasonal player'.

      I probably only play the game about 3-4 times a year, and only when the sun is shining and the course is nice and dry. As you can probably guess, I don't take it very serious, and as such I have yet to complete a course in less than 110!!!


      My equipment is very cheap basic, and I often hunt around in the long grassy areas of a course for golf balls to save myself from buying any. If I do happen to buy any balls, I always opt for the very cheapest that I can find, as I know that it is going to have a very minimal effect to my game regardless of whether I pay 50p a ball or £3 a ball, and eventually they all have the same destiny ahead of them i.e. sitting in the mud at the bottom of a lake, or if they are lucky they might be able to hide out in the long grass, in the 'out of bounds' sections of a course, until they rot away or a mower eventually chops them up!


      Last Christmas though, my brother bought me a box of Srixon 'soft feel' golf balls, and I have used them twice already this year! They come in a nice green and white cardboard box, and although I'm not sure where my brother got them from, or what he paid for them, they are available from Amazon for £14 for a box containing 12 balls. This is more than I would ever pay for golf balls myself, due to reasons explained above, but as I received them as a present, I was more than happy to give them a try.


      The balls themselves look pretty standard, as they are small, white and round, but they are supposed to have a 'soft feel' to them. This means that they have a softer external coating on them, which is designed to make them feel softer to make contact with when striking the ball with the club. This softer feel was something that I could just about notice, although to be 100% honest if I didn't already know that they were supposed to be a 'soft feel' ball, then I really don't think that it would have stood out to me when striking the ball.


      ~~ So in conclusion ~~


      These 'soft feel' balls from Srixon ( a Japenese golf ball manufacturere) look just like any other golf ball. They do have a slightly softer feel to them, which hasn't noticeably improved my game, but it certainly hasn't done it any harm. I can't hit the ball any further, or any more accurately, but I do think that they feel better due to the softness, and a better player would probably reap the benefits form them.

      If these balls were available for a little less then I would definately buy them regularly, but as I can purchase golf balls for less than half of the price that the Srixon balls are priced at, it is very unlikely that I will ever be inclined to fork out the £14 for another pack. That said I would be very happy to recieve another pack of these balls as a gift, but compared to a cheap low budget ball, I do feel extra gutted as I see one of the bright white Srixon 'soft feel' balls go PLOP into a lake.



      Thanks for reading.



      © L500589 2011

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        17.08.2010 00:40

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        Great ball for the price you won't be disappointed.

        I absolutely love these balls in the colder weather when it is harder to compress some of the tour balls out there. These balls are no slouch standing up to the other elite balls out there. I can spin these things just a bit less then the other premium balls out there. For the cheaper price I'm not sure whey I just don't play these things year round. These balls are great for any handicap out there weather you be a beginner or a advanced player. Even if you loose one out there on the links you don't feel so bad as if you would of lost a premium ball. All in all these balls a fantastic deal for the price and these are easily a favorite in my eyes. I hope Srixon keeps putting out these great balls for such a cheap price in my eyes. Have fun out there on the links.

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        14.08.2010 13:05
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        Decent ball for the mid handicappers

        As a golf ball manufacturer, Srixon is rated up there with the best of them - the company consistently uses innovative new technology in their ball design, and currently holds the greatest number of golf ball patents worldwide. Out of the entire Srixon range, I most frequently use their 'Soft Feel' balls, of which, a dozen can currently be purchased for £11.99 from amazon.co.uk.


        Let's Look at the Evidence
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        So how does this ball differ from any other ball? Well, as its title suggests, it has a soft feel, meaning that its outer shell isn't rock hard like many of the cheaper balls on the market. In practice, this means that that ball is nice to chip and putt with, and your touch around the greens should benefit from the softer coating.


        The Science Behind the Ball
        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
        From a technological perspective, the Srixon Soft Feel is a two piece ball, with a dimple pattern that is designed to promote a higher flight off the clubhead. But will the ball allow the shorter hitters to achieve a fair amount of distance from their drives? Short answer: yes. The ball's large core transfers a great deal of energy, and results in very reasonable distances. Similarly the dimple pattern that I previously mentioned also reduces drag on the ball when it's in the air. Compared to the last ball that I reviewed (the Nike One Black), the Srixon soft feel probably just has the edge in terms of the yardage, and it's a bit cheaper too.


        Near to the Pin
        - - - - - - - - - -
        From around the green the ball feels great to use, and whilst putting, the ball springs evenly from the putter-head. The Srixon is good to pitch and chip with too, although it seems to have more roll and less check than the more expensive balls. This isn't necessarily a bad thing however, as this style of play will suit a lot of higher handicap golfer's games.


        Final Word
        - - - - - - -
        Overall, I would recommend the Srixon Soft Feel Golf ball to mid-handicap golfers who require a sufficient amount of distance on their drives, and also a bit of feel when on the putting surface. For the pros amongst you, the ball won't generate enough spin from inwards of 100 yards, and therefore should probably be avoided - that said, the balls aren't aimed at the single figure golfers, so you wouldn't expect them to spin like a Titleist ProV1 (the number one ball in golf). The price is very reasonable, and if you don't want to buy new, you can pick up lake ball versions of the ball extremely cheaply indeed - highly recommended.

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          03.12.2009 19:23
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          A good ball for mid to low handicap golfers

          If any of you have read some of my reviews you will know I am a golfer.
          I play off a 14 handicap, so not bad for a girl.
          The problems I have as a lowish handicap female golfer is lack of distance off the tee and lack of control around the greens.

          Having played with calloway balls for many years I have become a recent convert to the Srixon soft feel ball, having won a dozen in a recent open competition.

          They are priced very competitivley, I bought a box of 12 for £12 last weekend at my golf club which is very reasonable, they may be cheaper online.

          They are a soft 2 piece ball. the cover is something called a pana-tetra enhanced ionomer cover, which I have found makes them very resilient and less likely to cut or get scuff marks, I certainly use them for many rounds before they need to be retired to my practice bag.

          They are designed to give a greater ball speed with lower spin with your driver, resulting in good carry distance, I have found that I drive the ball as far if not further than I did with my previous balls.

          The biggest benefit I have found is that due to their design I do manage to get spin or check on the ball when playing into the greens, even at my golf club that has very firm links type greens.

          When putting the words soft feel with an arrow at the end help to align putts to aid more consistent putting.

          These balls feel soft to hit and provide both the distance of a harder ball but a nice soft controlled feel around the greens.

          overall a very reasonably priced ball which is very good for mid to low handicapers who want distance off the tee and control around the greens. It will take something special for me to change from this ball.

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            01.09.2008 20:18

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            A good ball for mid-high handicappers

            Srixon are back with a brand new 333 dimple pattern and boy does it make a difference.
            The new soft feel does actually feel really good of the club face even when you dont completly middle the ball.
            These balls are especially useful for beginners as they minimize spin resulting in more accurate shots. Most beginners have low swing speeds so these balls are very useful. The new rabalon cover ensures your balls travel further which can be extremly useful especially on par 5 holes!
            I played 18 holes yesterday with these balls and I noticed on my drives the balls rolled on average over 20 yards further than my Callaway Hx Hot balls which are also very very good balls may i add! I was able to hit many greens in regulation mostly due to the great control and spin these balls offer. In my opinion they seem to be the perfect soft feel ball.

            Overall -
            A great ball for mid-high handicapers with loads of technology built in! The ball has minimal spinm but great distance. If this ball has 332 dimples it would be terrible haha :p seriously though a great ball!

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            09.06.2006 08:30
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            Well priced high performance golf ball for the average golfer.

            ~ ~ Srixon is probably not the first name that springs to a person’s mind when they think of golf equipment manufacturers. Names like Slazenger, John Letters and Dunlop, and more recently Taylor Made, Callaway, and Nike are the manufacturers of clubs, balls and equipment that most modern-day golfers would readily associate with being market leaders in the golf world.

            ~ ~ So who are Srixon, and why are they now quickly establishing themselves as a force to be reckoned with in the golf equipment market?
            Well, they’re a Japanese rubber company called Sumitomo Rubber Industries who have been manufacturing golf balls since way back in 1930, when they began producing Dunlop golf balls under licence in Japan. Thirty three years later, in 1963, they actually bought out Dunlop in the UK, and entered the golf ball market worldwide.
            So why have we never heard of them before? For decades they were content to simply rake in the massive profits from the sale of Dunlop golf balls, and it’s only in the last seven years or so that they have began to market golf balls and clubs using their own brand name of Srixon.
            They were actually the first golf ball manufacturer to pioneer the use of soft balata rubber in the manufacture of golf balls when they brought out the Dunlop Maxfli Balata HT ball, which until Titleist caught up a couple of years later was without question the ball of choice of all better golfers. I used the Maxfli Balata ball successfully for many years.

            ~ ~ There were two major problems with balata golf balls. Firstly, they didn’t go as far as a conventional two-piece construction ball, and secondly they were so soft that you were lucky to get one full round of golf from one before you had quite literally cut the cover to ribbons!
            So golf ball manufacturers began to develop “compromise” balls. These are solid two-piece golf balls (as distinct from the wound rubber in a balata ball) which fly much further and have harder covers, some so much so that they are virtually indestructible during normal play. (Think balls like the Top Flite and Dunlop DDH) But the problem with these harder balls is that while they travel much further, the spin rate is so poor it’s practically impossible to impart any control on the ball for the shorter more delicate shots around the putting green.

            ~ ~ But this problem has been solved in recent years with the development of outstanding balls like the “Titleist Pro V”, which is now the number one ball of choice of the vast majority of professional golfers and top amateurs.
            The Titleist Pro V is without doubt the premier golf ball available at present in the retail sector, and it’s the ball I used myself up until about two months ago when I changed to the ball that is the subject of this review; the Srixon Soft Feel.
            Now I can guess what you’re asking yourself. If I’m a serious golfer (which I am) and the Titleist Pro V is the best ball currently available, then why change?
            Well, the Pro V suits a lot of golfer’s games like a proverbial glove. The only problem with it is that like all golf balls used by professional golfers, it’s designed to perform best when it’s being used by a golfer with a very fast swing speed. A player’s swing speed is the rate the golf club head is travelling at when it actually makes contact with the ball, and is obviously one of the main determining factors in how far the ball will actually travel. The swing speed of your average everyday amateur golfer will vary within the range of 65 to 95 miles per hour at point of contact, whereas a professional player will achieve around 100 to 105mph. One of the games longest hitters and most successful golfers, Tiger Woods, has an absolutely astounding swing speed of 125mph!

            ~ ~ For anyone with a swing speed of around 95mph plus, then the Titleist Pro V is the golf ball to purchase. My problem is that I can no longer manage to generate this sort of club head speed, as the years (arthritis, rheumatism, and generally less flexible muscles and joints) have conspired against me. Up until about five years ago my average swing speed was around the 100 to 105mph mark, the same as a professional. However I recently had my swing speed analysed at a golf tournament I was visiting, and it is now in the region of 85 to 90mph. In fact, it’s probably a bit less, as I was conscious of being measured, and consequently most likely swung the club that little bit harder, albeit unconsciously!

            ~ ~ So what does this mean to me in terms of what golf ball I should use?
            The slower speed at which I now swing the club means that I’m simply not able to compress the ball as much as I was able in years gone by. This is especially so with balls like the Titleist Pro V. This means that I don’t hit it as far as I used to. This is where the Srixon Soft Feel ball comes into its own.
            My current driver, the TaylorMade 580XD, is one of the best on the market when it comes to transferring the energy from the club head to the ball. In the golf world this is called the COR factor, and the 580XD has an amazing COR factor of 0.87. This means it transfers 87% of the generated club head energy to the ball at point of impact. The softer compression of the Srixon Soft Feel means I can compress the golf ball more at point of impact. More compression of the golf ball along with a highly efficient transfer of power from the club head to the ball means it travels considerably further. When I say considerably further, I would say that on average I have managed to add an extra 30 yards to my drive over the two-month period or so since I started using the Srixon ball. (From about 240 yards average to around 270 to 275 yards average)
            To non-golfers this may seem a small improvement, but all golfers will immediately realise the benefits this extra yardage with the driver imparts. Put simply, it means I’m closer to the putting surface on a par-4 hole than before, which means I’m hitting a shorter iron (more lofted) into the green. A shorter distance means I get my second shots closer to the hole more consistently, and naturally this equates to sinking more putts, and thus making a better score. I’ve actually lost two full shots off my handicap since I began to use the Srixon, the first time in over three years that my handicap has been going *DOWN* instead of up!
            The ball is also lovely to use around the green for these little delicate pitch and chip shots. Lots of feel and feedback to the hands, and if you hit it in to the green high with a lofted club you can impart so much spin that the ball will pull up once it lands like it had power assisted brakes!

            ~ ~ Anything I don’t like about the Srixon Soft Feel? Well, yeah. In common with nearly all golf ball and club manufacturers these days Srixon seem to be hell bent on confusing the average punter by using as much technical jargon in their advertising as possible. Thus the Srixon Soft Feel is marketed as having a “Rabalon® HR Elastomer Blended” cover, and a “Super Soft Dual core” centre. Much play is also put on it having “Seamless 333 Aerodynamic” dimples, as it’s seemingly the only golf ball on the market with an odd (as opposed to even) number of dimples on its surface. All this meaningless gobbledigook makes about as much sense to your average punter who buys golf balls as the workings of a nuclear reactor! I do wish that manufacturers would cop onto themselves and drop all this meaningless drivel from their advertising.

            ~ ~ Meaningless advertising apart, it has to be said that I’ve been totally delighted with this marvellous golf ball since I’ve started to use it. It saves me a small fortune as well, as you can buy a box of a dozen Srixon Soft Feel balls in my local pro shop for only €22, compared to €55 for a box of a dozen Titleist Pro V1 balls! You might even get them a wee bit cheaper if you shop around on the Web or on eBay.
            A highly recommended ball for your average golfer, or for the player (like myself) who swings with a slightly slower swing speed.

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~

            © KenJ June 2006

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~

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