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Ernie Ball Assorted Colour Pick

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£2.92 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
4 Reviews

Brand: Ernie Ball / Type: Plectrum

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    4 Reviews
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      01.03.2012 18:55
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      All-round, good product.

      Here we have a selection of picks produced by the musical brand, 'Ernie Ball' which has produced some great products over the years, including the strings I reviewed previously. I like the styles and shapes Ernie's products adopt, these plectrums are the typical tear drop shape, a particular favorite of mine. I like the Ernie logo/text font and I love the colourful way the products are packaged and displayed, this is something the company has got spot on - whilst keeping their catalogue at a reasonable price-range. The picks come in a variety of colours which don't (unlike other pick products) correspond with their thickness/type or style. The picks are coloured different just for the hell of it, and why not. They come in a wide range of colours, the following: white, black, red, yellow, blue and pink for the girls. I suppose you could look at the colours as a negative thing (because they don't have much meaning), but they still serve the purpose of allowing you to find the plectrums easily when dropped or generally lost. Instead of having the millimeter thickness of each pick clear inscribed on the picks its, there are either the letters T for thin, M for medium or H for heavy. Perhaps the picks of the same letter aren't exactly the same thickness due to more manufacturing quality, so they thought to get round this by not putting the accurate mm thickness. Using the letter system does allow people to more quickly decipher their favourite size and halts confusion about sizes/remembering the size you used last, etc. The picks perform well and can be bought in sets of 12 for about £5-7. Despite worries concerning the thicknesses being equal, the material of the picks is sound. It is of decent quality and to be honet that's all that matters. The best pick classification in my opinion is T (thin), it can be used for strumming and picking and works excellently in both these areas. The thinner option also bends easier when being used, whilst always returning to its original shape at the end of a session. The H (heavy) pick is rubbish, way too thick and useless for any guitar related activity. In conclusion, these sets of picks are of good practical strength. They are extremely useful and despite some inconsistencies with the colouring and thickness, I do really like my set alot.

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      23.01.2012 22:38
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      Really good plectrums

      Ernie Ball are one of my favourite musical brands, and I frequently find myself purchasing both their strings and guitar picks. Their standard plectrums are made from Cellulose acetate nitrate and are available in thin, medium, and heavy gauges. The thin variety have a thickness are 0.46mm, the medium ones are 0.72mm, whilst the thickest weigh in at 0.94mm. Design & Specification - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Shaped in the traditional tear-drop design, the plectrums are sold in a range of colours (white, black, red, pink, yellow, and blue), although the colours don't actually relate to the thickness. Rather than have the thickness in millimetres printed on the plectrum, the gauge is marked via a small "T" (thin), "M" (medium), or "H" (heavy) indicator on the front. I personally use the medium variety, and occasionally the thin ones if i've got light-gauge strings on my acoustic guitar. Price & Availability - - - - - - - - - - - - Ernie Ball plectrums are widely available in music shops throughout the country. In terms of the cost, the assorted multipack (containing twelve of your chosen gauge) currently retails at £5.40 from Amazon. With regards to value for money, there are cheaper branded plectrums out there - but at roughly 45p each, I feel that the cost isn't unreasonable. Use and Final Word - - - - - - - - - - - - - Durability-wise, Ernie Ball plectrums are long lasting and feel comfortable to use. Although they're not grooved for grip, I find I can hold on to them without difficulty in the mist of a gold old strum. In use, the picks return a bright tone and are certainly as good as the Fender Pearl picks that I also frequently use. Overall I would certainly recommend these effective big-name plectrums as a great choice for both amateur and professional strummers alike.

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        12.01.2012 14:26
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        Some Good Picks

        It's amazing how many picks you accumulate over the years. I have been playing guitar for around fifteen years now and over that time I have bought countless picks. In case you are unaware a pick is a small usually plastic piece of material that is used for strumming the guitar strings. Picks or plectrums as they are also known come in various shapes and sizes and can often been seen as quite collectable. Every one who plays guitar using a pick will have their own personal favourite. I tend to go for the thinner ones more often that not as these give you are more mellow sound. I must admit, when I looked through my collection of picks, the vast majority were Dunlop ones. But there are a few other makes in their as well. One of these is Ernie Ball. Ernie Ball are probably most well known for their guitar strings, but that also have a range of picks as well. The fact is that this is not really that difficult a product to make, I actually recently saw a plectrum punch where you could make your own picks out of any thin plastic such as an old credit card. Despite that fact though I will try by best to give this a decent review. The Ernie Ball assorted guitar picks come in a few different colours as you would expect. The one I have is a blue one and to be honest it's not one that I use all that often. It is a little bit thicker than what I would generally go for. There are other ones available though in this range and some are thicker and some are thinner. The shape is pretty standard for a guitar pick, the classic oval shape which most people tend to favour when they are playing. These do come in a multipack or you can buy them individually. I picked mine up from my local music shop, I thick it cost me around 80p a few years ago. You can buy a pack of these for around £6 if you shop around online. The picks are made from pretty durable plastic, when I use mine it shows no sign of wear and although I have not used it massively, it does still look pretty much as good as new. The pick is easy to grip and I have no problems with it slipping out of my fingers when I'm playing. Overall then these picks are pretty good quality and good value. Ernie Ball is a well respected name and although you can't really go wrong with picks, these still have a certain quality about them. If you are looking to try some new picks or maybe just one then there is no reason why you should not think about buying Ernie Ball.

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          15.07.2011 12:15
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          Good quality, durable picks that I'll continue to use.

          I decided to take up the guitar for several reasons- it's easy to teach yourself the basics, it's relatively inexpensive and it's a lot of fun to sing along to, either by yourself or with friends. One downside I hadn't bargained on, however, was the toll it takes on your fingers. Although I soon developed tough little callouses on my finger tips that prevented any more pain while playing my classical guitar, when I branched out to electric it soon became clear that I'd never be able to play without a fair amount of discomfort- the strings were just too sharp. So a pick became absolutely essential, both for pain-free playing and for the added volume it brought. My little local guitar shop didn't have a great range of picks to choose from, which actually turned out to be a good thing as I'd have been completely baffled by a wide choice. As it was, it was easy to pick out (ha ha) a couple of Ernie Ball picks, priced at around 40p each. I went for good old black and white, although as you can see from the pic (ha ha again) there are a wide range of other colours available if you're more adventurous than me. These picks are available in different thicknesses- thin (0.46mm), medium (0.72mm) and heavy (0.94mm), depending on your preferences and requirements. I went for thin, as the man in the shop told me that these would be good for beginners, being well suited to strumming. The picks I have are made from cellulose acetate nitrate (plastic, in other words!), but you can also get them in nylon. There's really not a lot to say about their appearance- they're standard pick shape, and bear the name Ernie Ball in a bold, modern font on the front with a letter denoting their thickness underneath. My thin picks are quite bendy, and I initially feared that they would snap easily under the pressure of the strings, particularly on my electric guitar. Fortunately, this hasn't proved the case and I've now had them for around 6 years. Admittedly I haven't used them very often- a broken amp that I've not got round to getting fixed means that I haven't played my electric guitar for a long time, but I'd say the two picks I own have seen a couple of years' good use between them with no signs of damage. I tend not to use these picks when playing my classical guitar- it's not really necessary given the nylon strings, and although using a pick does give a much clearer, crisper sound, I generally prefer the softer, smoother sound I get from playing without a pick on this guitar. For my electric, however, these picks are a must- as well as saving my fingers from being torn to shreds on the sharp strings, I love the clarity and volume of the sound that the picks provide. The only problem is with the thinness of my picks- it means that they can be hard to control when picking as they bend annoyingly against the strings, so I think that once I start playing my electric again I'll try a medium pick instead of thin. I would certainly be happy to buy Ernie Ball picks again, however, as they've proved great value for money over the years I've had them. The cellulose picks I have are comfortable to hold and slide nicely over the strings without slipping or catching, so I don't feel the need to change. Available online from around £4 for a pack of 25, these picks do the job without breaking the bank.

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