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Lush Caca Marron Henna Hair Dye

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12 Reviews

Brand: Lush / Type: Hair Colour

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    12 Reviews
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      12.03.2013 10:05
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      I'll be sticking to chemical hairdyes from now on

      I absolutely love Lush their products. I love their whole ethos of using natural ingredients and usually this results in gorgeous products which not only feel lovely to use but they normally also are really effective. It is a sad day when I buy something there I have never tried and am left disappointed.

      Unfortunately that is how I felt after using their Henna hair dye in Cacca Marron. I just found it so awkward and messy to use and although I liked the idea behind it the practicality of using it was just too fiddly for me to bother again and as the results were nothing special I will just stick to using hair dyes in future.

      I have always dyed my hair and I got this as it promised to give me a lovely rich red tone to my hair. It comes in a solid block and isn't the prettiest Lush product to buy but as it is natural Henna this is expected. The earthy smell is also weird but that is probably just because I am used to all the fruity smells that lush usually produce.

      This was such a fiddly process when I went to use it. First of all you need to melt the henna which you do by boiling a pan of water and then putting a bowl on top of the pan just like when you melt chocolate for making rice crispie cakes. You keep adding water to the henna as it melts until it resembles double cream. I am sure there must be an easier way to do it but this is what was recommended to me by the girl in the shop and I wanted to make sure that I followed her instructions to the letter to get a good result.

      This takes absolutely ages and I got so bored standing there stirring the henna while waiting for it to melt. It did melt eventually but it took ages so make sure that you give yourself plenty of time to do it. Once it is melted it is ready to apply to your hair.

      This was the messiest experience I have ever had applying hair dye. It got absolutely everywhere and took a long time to evenly cover my hair. It also thickens and hardens as it cools which is a weird feeling and not one that I found pleasant.

      Once this is on you can either leave it to dry naturally or else you can wrap your head in clingfilm and use a hairdrier to give yourself an even more intense colour. I used the clingfilm as I wanted it to look dramatic after spending so long doing it.

      You are supposed to leave this on for a minimum of one hour or longer if you want a more intense colour. I lasted 2 hours before I got fed up and had to remove it. I am sure if I had left it longer then I might have had a better result but I just don't have the time to leave it in my hair for hours on end especially as it is so messy and I have kids running about asking me what I am doing constantly.


      Washing this out of my head was a long and painful experience as it just refused to shift even after 20 minutes of rinsing. It did all come out eventually but it wasn't easy and by this point I was exhausted with the whole experience.

      I was excited to see what my hair was like after using this and it was hard to tell when it was still wet but as I blowdried it I was left feeling really disappointed. Instead of a rich brown with red tones my hair looked pretty much the same with only the slightest hint of red. The red tones were so subtle that I really had to strain to notice them and it was only in the light that I could see them. If this had taken 20 minutes then I might not have been so disappointed but after taking so much time and effort I expected to see better results.

      It was looking shiny and felt in good condition but I could get this same result from just using a good conditioning treatment.
      I was really disappointed with the results and even though there was loads of henna left over there was no way I was ever going to bother using it again after the hassle and lack of results that I got so it ended up going in the bin.

      I really liked the idea of putting natural henna on my hair and was excited by it as it has been used by women for thousands of years so I was expecting big things. Unfortunately I really just thought it wasn't very good and certainly not worth the £7.95 that I paid for it. If like me you have dark hair then I wouldn't recommend this, it might look more dramatic on lighter hair but for me the results just didn't warrant the time and effort it took to use this and even though it is natural I will be sticking to chemical hair dyes from now on.

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        14.08.2012 13:54
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        a permanent hair dye

        My hair is naturally light brown with reddish highlights appearing in the summer but over the years I have dyed it almost every colour under the sun. I was fed up with my hair and fancied going darker for a while; I had heard a lot of good things about the Lush Henna dyes but the hassle involved in using them always put me off. Lush Edinburgh started having Henna parties where they would do all of the messy work of mixing the henna to a paste and applying it for you. The thought of being pampered and dying my hair cheaply without covering my bathroom in goo really appealed to me so I booked myself in for a session.
        Henna is a natural plant which is ground down and mixed with cocoa butter to make a block of hair dye. There are 4 different shades available and I chose the Caca Marron which gives a chestnut glow to blond to light brown hair. As with all hair dyes it is sensible to do a skin and hair strand test before use to make sure you will not have an allergic reaction and will have some idea of the finished results. Lush were happy to break a bit off a larger henna block for free to let me do this.

        I am very glad that I had the henna applied in the shop as applying it is a very messy process. Firstly you have to break the block of henna up into smaller squares and add boiling water to make a paste. You then put it into a bowl over a pot of boiling water until it is heated through, Lush caution you against using a microwave to heat it but they used the microwave in the back of the shop to do this! You are left with a large bowl of extremely thick greenish brown goo which smells like grass and herbs.

        The application process took around half an hour with two of the Lush assistants working on my below shoulder length hair. Firstly the applied mousturiser around my hairline to stop it being dyed and then the fun of applying the gloop began. They worked on each section of my hair working it in evenly from root to tip, I was provided with an overall but at home you would want to wear your oldest T-shirt in case of spillage. They then put cotton wool all round my hairline to stop any drips and then covered me in cling film and I put a scarf round my head (making me look like a cancer patient!) to go home. The henna is very heavy, it is much heavier and denser than typical hair dyes and my hair felt extremely heavy.
        Lush say you need to leave the hair dye on for between one and four hours but I was tired when I got home and ended up falling asleep with it in my hair ruining a pillowcase in the process. I then began the task of washing the henna out, because the henna is so thick and gritty it took a couple of shampoos and a lot of rinsing to achieve this. The shower looked a right mess once I was finished but it was surprisingly easy to wash the mess away and there was no staining of the porcelain shower basin or tiles but it did take a lot of heavy scrubbing to get the dye out of the grout.

        Once my hair was dry the results were impressive. My hair was a deep mahogany with the red being especially vibrant which is probably because I left it on for so long. My hair was also super soft and looked extremely healthy and well nourished and seemed to have more volume. This colour faded slightly over the next few weeks but I actually preferred it as the red became slightly less prominent. I have a few grey hairs and they were all fully covered and the colour was multi tonal and not just one solid block of colour.

        After a few weeks I had some regrowth of my fair roots and had to decide whether or not to allow the henna to grow out or dye it again. I decided to dye it a second time again going for the marron and after leaving it on for only a couple of hours the results were far nicer with the colour not being so intensely red.

        The problem with henna is that it is a permanent dye so when the roots started showing again I faced a dilemma. I didn't want to go with the henna again as I was now bored with being a redhead and wanted to go back to my natural colour. The henna does fade over time but never comes out of your hair completely. I asked my hairdresser for advice thinking she could maybe bleach it out but she refused to touch it. There are various websites which tell you that things like lemon juice and olive oil will help speed up the removal of henna from the hair but they didn't work for me. I have ended up using temporary red dyes from shaders and toners or red coloured shampoo from Superdrug to disguise my fair roots and so my hair doesn't look like two completely different colours by blending my natural hair into the dyed bit. My fair roots are now at about ear level but it will take a few more months before I will have long enough hair that I will feel comfortable cutting all the henna dyed hair away.

        The Lush henna is a high quality product made from all natural ingredients and at around £6.50 compares favourably with the prices of other dyes. It does give impressive results but you do need to make sure you know that the results are permanent and be sure the end result is one you will want to live with for a while.

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        • More +
          12.02.2012 20:40

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          a great natural alternative to chemical dyes

          I had never died my hair before and decided to go for it big style with henna - caca marron from lush. Maron will turn your hair a lovely chesnut brown with a red tint.

          Firstly, my best advice is to talk to your local lush store if you have one. They will be able to advise about how much you need and techniques. They will often give you gloves (do not use henna without gloves unless you are ok with very stained skin!). The lush staff are always great with advice I have found. Also, make sure you put an oil based cream around your hairline to stop your face being stained!

          Secondly, set aside about 6 hours for this process. Yes, really. It is messy and frustrating but it's fun - you never truly know what colour you will turn out because it really depends on your starter hair colour!

          Thirdly be brave because of the point above - it really is a bit of a gamble - but marron was nice to get a bit of red in your hair without going to mad!

          This henna is mixed with cocoa butter so is so soft on your hair, however when you do finally wash it off after 6 hours it is like washing mud from your hair and if you have long hair like mine then this will be a lengthy process!

          This really is a nice product and a great alternative to hair dye which lets face it, will damage your hair eventually. The only down side is that it really is messy and lengthy.

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          31.12.2011 01:15
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          if it wasnt so messy, it would be amazing

          I've always been tempted to dye my hair, but been afraid of using harsh chemicals and further damaging. However i was drawn to this product as it is mainly herbal and as such means there is little hair damage.
          The hair dye is a combination of Persian henna, cocoa butter and herbs, namely indigo that lush claims help to create a natural and nourishing deeply effective hair day. The product is made up of 100% natural ingredients and I love that idea. Henna itself is a pigment extracted from a small tree that is used in Indian tradition as a hair dye or as a skin dye. It is often used in Indian weddings to decorate the brides hands and feet. Lush produce the hair dye in 4 pigments, noir, brun, marron and and rouge. The different colours come from the different types of plants, and the location in which that plant is grown and not from any form of synthetic dye.

          *Packaging*
          It comes packaged as a block of henna with 6 sections, wrapped in white lush paper, along with directions for use. The block looks a lot like a tea brick (an Arabic form of money) and i think its great how lush have tried to keep the history of Henna well alive in this product. The paper is recyclable which is another plus point, and on it is written the directions for use. You can smell the henna through the packaging, its a deep planty smell that i really liked. The product itself is dark green in colour and very strange looking. I have seen nothing like it before

          *Directions for use*
          Break up the block into its six sections and dissolve in boiling water to produce a thick paste. You should use just enough water to cover the blocks. Apply to hair and wrap hair in cling film for 1-4 hours depending on intensity of hair required. Rinse out and wash hair.

          *Usage*
          I decided to use two of the sections of henna and leave it on for the full 4 hours, deciding that if i liked the effect i could do it again and not have to go and buy a new block. I found that the henna blocks quickly dissolved in the water, i was preparing the mixture for about 5 minutes until i got to the consistency of thick cream. I then transferred myself to the bathroom where i donned some cheap gloves from poundland and sectioned my hair.
          Applying the henna to my hair was tricky to say the least, it slipped through my fingers onto the gloves, and it was hard to pick up in the first place but eventually, after about half an hour i managed to have my hair fully coated in henna. I changed my gloves to clean ones, wrapped my hair in clingfilm and then set about cleaning my bathroom. The smell of henna by this point had also become a little overwhelming.
          After application my bathroom was a mess! Little bits of henna had flown everywhere and i'm very glad i applied this in my bathroom and not in my room. I dread to think what the henna would have done to my carpet.

          *Finished colour*
          After rinsing, washing and styling i took a good look at my hair. There was a hint of red, much more noticeable when my hair caught some light, but for the most part it was a lovely chocolate colour. I really liked it. I do think, had i used more of the tea brick i would have got a more vibrant red colour, but this is probably the best colour for me, not so much of a change, but enough to be noticeable.
          Also my hair felt amazingly soft, light and bouncy, with no hint of the smell of henna. For the next few washes, the smell of henna did get released from my hair, but i can only take that as a good sign that the henna was well bound to my hair.


          Overall i think this is the best hair dye around, it gives a beautiful colour and the fact that its 100% natural is a major bonus

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            12.04.2011 22:07
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            Worth the effort.

            I have used this colour a number of times on my natural mousey light brown hair and every time I end up with a beautiful, shiny light conker colour and my hair in wonderful condition.
            Admittedly there is mess, but this can be limited, to break it up it's just as easy to pop cut up blocks of henna into a blend and to whizz it into a powder to get it to the best consistancy to mix up and then add some Jasmine and Henna Fluff-Eaze which not only helps it smooth through the hair when you're applying it but also helps the wash out process it which is one of the most time-consuming parts.
            All in all you do have to put a bit of time into using the henna but the fact that it's such a rich colour and it doesn't ruin your hair at all, and in fact, protects it, makes this worth using a hundred times over.

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              09.01.2011 00:07
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              There's no poo in this, it just looks and smells like it.

              I've been using Lush Caca Brun to dye my hair for the last couple of months and been really pleased with the results. It's turned my hair from a lifeless bleached blonde, to a multi-tonal light brown with reddish highlights. And after 20+ years of being damaged by bleach it's finally in beautiful condition. So why would I want to change to Caca Marron? Well I decided to be just a little more daring and wanted a bit more red in my hair. I'm not quite ready to go the full hog with Caca Rouge, so decided to give Caca Marron a try, as from reading the product descriptions, it should give a more vivid result than Brun while not turning my hair full out red.

              *I will at various points in this review be comparing this to Caca Brun*

              ==What Lush Says==

              For hair the colour of shiny autumn conkers, Caca Marron gives hair a natural warmth with subtle dark red tones.

              Caca Marron is the perfect starter henna for anyone who's got their eye on Caca Rouge's vibrant red but isn't quite brave enough to take the plunge just yet. It will ease you in gently with a darker shade that's just enough to add a bit of je ne sais quoi.

              ==What's In This Caca Then==

              Right before I go any further, let's get the toilet humour out of the way with. The name Caca means poo (well the more adult word for poo really), so let's get the sniggers over and done with, shall we. But although this hair dye might be named after poo, it certainly doesn't contain any sh*t.

              The main constituent of Caca is Red Henna, a powder made from the dried leaves of the Henna plant. Red Henna has been used to dye hair, skin, finger nails and even leather and wool for centuries. Being a natural product, the results from Henna will vary widely from person to person, as such factors as original hair colour, type and amount of grey affecting the final colour. But there will always be some amount of red in the final colour, whether that is just a glint or full on. What I have noticed is that whereas with the Caca Brun, Henna was only the second ingredient on the list, with Caca Brun it's listed first, which immediately tells me that this is going to give me a far redder colour.

              The next listed ingredient is Cocoa Butter, which is extracted from cocoa beans and is regularly used by Lush due to it's conditioning and moisturising qualities. When used in other products it gives off a lovely chocolate aroma, but to be honest you really can't smell it in Caca. What it does do is form the solid base to hold the Henna, and with there being a little less in Caca Marron compared to Brun I find this is much harder to grate and melt.

              Other ingredients include Indigo, which is often referred to as Black Henna (along with the nasty chemical PPD which you won't find in Caca). Of course this isn't really Henna, but unlike PPD, Indigo will darken the colour without running the risk of nasty allergic reactions. Marron also contains ground coffee, which Lush says will darken the red, but to be honest I'm not quite sure how this would work as surely the coffee will just wash out. Clove Oil, Lemon, and Irish Moss Powder are in the mix, I'm assuming to help condition the hair and there are a few other ingredients, so consult the Lush website for a full list.

              ==Looks like Poop, Right==

              In it's solid state, Caca Marron looks rather like an over-sized bar of chocolate or illegal substance, with each block being made up of six chunks. Colour-wise, it's a medium to dark brown tinged with green. I find all of the Cacas rather greasy to the touch and they do start to melt in the hands quite quickly. While in a solid state, the scent is barely discernable, but the earthy aroma of Henna does break through, especially as it starts to melt. Personally I'm not that keen on the smell of Henna, but I live with it because of how much I like the effect on my hair.

              Available both online and in-store, Caca Marron comes in at £7.25, at first glance this is an expensive way of colouring your hair. But, thinking about it a half-way decent chemical hair dye will cost at least £5 and you can only get one use out of it (not even that if you have long hair). With this Caca Marron, I only use one segment each time I dye my ear length bob, meaning I get six uses out for just over £7. If bought on the High Street this comes unwrapped without any instructions, but you can wrap it in one of Lush's trademark yellow paper bags, which I would suggest you do as Henna stains any fabrics or skin it comes in contact with. I'm also assuming that instructions are available on request. As I bought mine online, it came wrapped in what looks like plastic but is actually cellulose and also came with a black and white photocopied instruction leaflet.

              ==Preparation is the key==

              Just as with chemical dyes, it's important to do both a strand and allergy test before using Henna for the first time. Just because something is natural, doesn't mean that there isn't a chance of an allergic reaction. The strand test is probably far more important than with chemical dyes, as the results from Henna can vary so wildly depending on original hair colour, type, condition, how much Henna you use and how long you leave it on for.

              After doing a strand test it's time to start preparing the Caca for use and while this does involve a bit more effort than chemical dye, after a couple of times it almost becomes second nature. First thing I would say though, is make sure you have plenty of time, the complete process can take anything up to six hours (or even longer). You'll also need a few utensils and although these are found in most kitchens you may want to buy some purely for when you use Caca, as I have done. You'll need a heatproof bowl and this needs to not only be able to withstand boiling water but also being placed over a saucepan of boiling water. Personally I use a Pyrex bowl that cost me a couple of quid in Wilkinsons. Then you'll need a grater, because the Caca is far easier to work with if you grate it before melting, and you'll need a wooden or plastic spoon to stir it, a saucepan that the bowl will fit in (without touching the bottom) and a pair of gloves (I use an old pair of washing up gloves). Oh and you need plenty of newspaper and depending on whether you want a redder colour, Clingfilm and an old towel.

              Once you've got everything together, it's time to get the Caca ready to apply to your hair. The first thing to do is break off however many pieces you'll need. I only need to use one piece (out of the six) to colour my hair, but it is in quite a short bob, reaching down to the tops of my ears (at it's longest point, and at the nape of my neck at the shortest). I would imagine that shoulder length hair would need two to three blocks, but don't quote me on that. I find it quite difficult to break the Caca into pieces, but I have a lovely partner who does it for me. Although it is possible to prepare the Caca without grating it, I personally found it takes far too long for it to melt, and so the next stage is to grate the Caca into the bowl. Although it's not particularly difficult to grate, it is a lot harder than Caca Brun, and as I'm grating I find it starts to melt in my hands, meaning that I need to wash my hands straight after.

              Once the Caca is grated, it needs to be covered with boiling water and then left for a few minutes to start melting. While waiting for the Caca to melt, it's best to cover the floor where you're going to be working with newspaper, because this is going to get very messy. After a few minutes, the Caca needs stirring and then more water added until it's the consistency of double cream. I find it best to add a little water at a time, stirring for a couple of minutes before adding more. Once the mix is smooth it smells revolting and looks rather like runny poo, although thankfully it's not as green as Caca Brun. The final step before putting this on your head is to place the bowl over a saucepan of water to get the mixture as hot as you can stand as the hotter the mix is the better the final colour.

              ==Pooh Head, Pooh Head==

              Applying the Henna to your hair can be quite a strange experience, especially if you're used to chemical dyes. Instead of going on cold, it feels very, very warm and it can be quite difficult to cover your hair evenly, because as it cools it thickens. I'd say it takes me about quarter of an hour for me to make sure I've covered every last strand, whereas it would only take me five minutes with a chemical dye. I will say though, that it took me considerably longer the first time. I do find this a very messy process and usually end up with Henna all round my face, down my neck, back and everywhere (so old clothes are advisable), but this is easily cleaned using baby wipes. At this stage you can leave your hair uncovered, if you're after a darker colour, or cover your hair with Clingfilm if you want a redder look. Personally I cover my head with clingfilm, which is a really sexy look, I'm sure you'd agree. And now it's time to wait.

              Although the instructions that came with the Caca suggest a minimum time of an hour, I personally keep this on for six hours at a time, which is why I said leave plenty of time. Although I don't experience any stinging or burning sensations it does start to get a little uncomfortable as the Caca begins to harden. And I really can't say the smell is particularly pleasant either, it's a sort of musty, earthy aroma that manages to escape the clingfilm every now and again. On the one occasion I used this without clingfilm it was far, far worse and I couldn't last the full six hours, but with clingfilm I can manage to wait it out. I also give my hair a boost of heat once an hour using a hairdryer, I don't know whether this effects the results but I have read that heat helps the colour develop.

              ==Getting Mess Everywhere==

              After waiting the six hours it's time to wash the Henna out, and there's no denying that this takes a lot of effort and makes a lot of mess. This isn't a dye that washes straight out, I find it takes up to half an hour to get it out of my hair, and that's with lots of practise. My personal method, is to soak my hair, massage my scalp and then rinse and rinse and rinse again. After the water appears to have run clear, I then shampoo and rinse again, finding that yet more green comes out. I always find that I manage to splash gritty, green goo all over the bath, but this washes off a lot easier than it washes out of my hair. I'll often find that I've thought I'd washed all the Caca out of my hair, only to find that I can feel gritty bits, so I always rinse my hair several more times after the water runs clear.

              ==Red Head?==

              Even while my hair was still wet I could see a dramatic difference in colour the first time I used Caca Marron, it looked far, far darker and much redder. As I dried my hair I could see just how much more dramatic my hair colour was, I wouldn't say it was chestnut coloured, but it was a medium brown with very distinctive red highlights throughout. It's a very natural looking colour though, probably because it's not just one flat colour, but a multitude of different shades. Oh and there's not a hint of grey, which is always a bonus. As another plus point, my hair always feels beautifully conditioned, smooth, silky and fizz free immediately after washing out the Henna, even without using actual conditioner.

              As with all colour, the red does fade a little over time, but it fades quite evenly and still leaves my hair looking dramatically different from it's natural colour. Although I do top up the Henna every couple of weeks, the difference is still noticeable just before the top up and people who I haven't seen for a while do comment on how nice it looks. I could probably go longer between uses, but even though the whole process is a bit of a faff, I do love how my hair looks and feels the next day. Something I have noticed is that if I miss washing my hair for a couple days the red becomes far more noticeable as my hair gets greasy, I don't know why, but it does.

              ==Should you go Chestnut?==

              As with Caca Brun, I'm finding making a recommendation really difficult. Hair colour is such a personal thing and the results from Caca Marron can vary wildly from person to person. The fact that it looks great on my hair doesn't mean it will on yours, even if your hair colour is the same as mine originally was. What I will say is either go into your nearest Lush, or phone mail order and ask for a sample (with your next order) and do a strand test. If you like the results, then go for it, because it leaves your hair in far better condition than chemical dyes, with less risk of allergic reaction. If you don't like the strand test results then there's nothing lost, but don't whatever you do use this without a strand test, because you will not be able to bleach it out (bleach will just drive the colour further into the hair shaft). And you can dye your hair safe in the knowledge that no bunnies have been hurt just so you can cover your grey.

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                08.11.2010 00:28
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                Don't bother!

                I am a Lush fanatic and buy many products from Lush - although I tend to particularly focus on the bath products rather than any products directed at hair care. However, on this one occasion, I saw the Lush Caca Marron Henna Hair Dye and I'd thought I'd give it a try. I had used Henna on one other occasion (not from Lush) and I hadn't actually been very impressed, but I've heard a lot of people rave on about Henna and so I thought I'd give it another try. The Caca Marron Henna Hair Dye from Lush was £6.50 which I felt was expensive as my hair dye is generally cheaper than this - but Lush products on the whole do tend to be on the expensive side and so it wasn't out of what I expected it would be.

                The Caca Marron is intended to give your hair a chestnut / maroon red sheen to it - which is generally the colour I opt for.

                As with many Lush products, when I bought it it was without any formal packaging but it was placed in a Lush Paper bag, which was made from recycled paper. I do like Lush's attempt to be environmentally friendly in the areas they can. It came as a solid bar which didn't look unlike a gritty chocolate bar and it was infact scored into blocks that aids it to be broken up more easily.

                To use it, you need to break up the Henna bar which is not difficult but it is also quite stiff and its not as easy as I would like it to be. I was able to do it with my hands however. I then needed to warm the broken bits of the Henna bar by placing it in a bowl and then placing this in saucepan with water about halfway up the bowl and allowing it to heat. It took about 10 minutes to heat to a level where it was liquified and was ready to be placed on my head. During this heating process, the smell of the Henna was very evident.....like freshly cut grass....which was fine and I know it the smell of genuine Henna and so this was reassuring.

                Placing it on my hair was a messy business! Unlike hair dyes, there were not a pair of protective gloves to use when putting this product on, but luckily I had a pair or Marigold gloves and so I used them which worked adequately. However, like I said, it was messy because it was very sloppy and didn't have the consistency of hair dyes that allow this to coat the hair easily. I actually found it quite difficult to coat my hair adequately because bits of the mixture kept dropping off on the floor!

                I had to leave it on for a few hours.....I wanted it to be as deep as possible, so I left it on for about 4 hours. And then I washed it off....which was another messy business. Even after rinsing thoroughly, my hair smelled of tea-leaves which wasn't an affect I was looking for.

                Once my hair had dried, I felt the colour was okay. It was quite muted and not particularly vibrant, but it did look natural and had good coverage....although I still smelled like a tea bag! However, within a matter of days, the colour faded, and within a week, my hair looked like I had never put anything on it. What was the point in going through all of that rigmarole for less than a weeks "okay" hair colouring.

                This product is not for me and I will not be trying it again. I just feel that there are much better options that Henna these days.

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                  14.02.2010 17:05
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                  Wouldn't buy again.

                  Henna is a natural hair dye that comes from the henna plant. Pure henna is red, but the colour can be modified by adding other ingredients, which is what Lush has done for this product. Their henna blocks come in four colours, Caca Rouge (straight red) Caca Brun (deep brown with very little red) Caca Noir (blue-black) and Caca Marron (chest-nut red). I am reviewing Caca Marron.

                  Price and packaging:

                  This is sold for £7.10 at Lush (www.lush.co.uk) as of February 2010. Bcause it is a 'naked' product, i.e. solid it needs no packaging, except a paper bag that you wrap it in to take home. This helps to save the planet :)

                  Scent and appearance:

                  This has quite a strong earthy smell. Some say it reminds them of freshly cut grass, I would add coffee to that. The smell comes just from the ingredients, no extra scent has been added. As to appearance, it is a thick heavy bar of 2x3 squares. Looks vaguely like chocolate. The picture above is accurate. The colour varies depending on which block you buy. Some have said the smell gives them a headache, but I have never found that myself.

                  How to use and my opinion:

                  Basically, you chop it up, heat with hot water in a bain-marie/two saucepans on top of eachother, slap it on your head and couple of hours later rinse it out. However, that is a very basic method. A much better and more detailed one can be found here: http://www.lushie.com/haircare-hennas.html The lady who did that site has sadly died, so some bits are a bit out of date. Henna hasn't changed though, and her method is the best I've found. Although she says don't use metal, you can. Cheap henna with metallic salts in will react with metal and turn your hair frog-butt green. Lush henna doesn't have this in, so don't worry. I used a metal saucepan and metal spoon and was fine.

                  As to my opinion...well it was great as a hair moisturiser (and I mean this, really wonderful) but as a colour, nuh-uh. It faded away within days for me. It covered my granny's grey hair though, so who knows...

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                    10.10.2009 21:43

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                    Good for those who don't mind a henna-flecked carpet!

                    In Lush,almost a year ago this caught my eye.I hadn't dyed my hair in years,had no intentions of it,but how cool do these bars look? So very cool! So,I decided that maybe my hair needed dyed after all...

                    I bought it,took it home and put it in the cupboard. The next dat I decided to do my hair. Wow,what a mess!

                    I can't remember much back in the days when I used to dye my hair with 'normal' hair-dye,but I do remember that it was never so fun! You actually get to cook this stuff,melt it up in a pot and everything.

                    It smells so lovely,and you can't wait to put it in your hair.

                    However,it really does make a massive mess,so not one to use if you have white carpets.

                    It made my hair,as well as my partners,a lovely colour - glossy as hell,and it has lasted for so much longer than most 'normal' hair dyes would and looks so natural.

                    I still have two cubes left,by the way,so it took 4 cubes to do my bum-length hair and my partners shoulder-length hair.

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                    21.07.2009 01:59
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                    May be a bit daunting if youre not used to colouring your own hair

                    I have coloured my own hair since I was 16, so I had two and a half decades of multicoloured experience under my belt, when I gave this a try.

                    Normally I would pick any colour or product that was on 'special' and bung it on - obviously to the detriment of my locks eventually, which sometimes resembled dry straw sitting on top of my head - so I thought it was time for a more natural approach. I was a girl who also used normal henna powder back in the 80s so sort of knew what to expect.

                    I plumped for the Caca Marron, as I like a reddish/auburn tone to my hair, without the full on RED!!! The block was fairly large, segmented into 6 chunks and cost £6.95.

                    For my shoulder length hair I used two small blocks (1/3), which was plenty. No fuss for me, I boiled the kettle, chucked the two blocks in a small plastic bowl (the instructions suggest chop or grate the blocks, I never bothered) , poured on a small amount of boiled water (again not precious about amount - just enough to start it to melt). I then used a plastic spoon, I'm sure theres something about not using metal implements on henna, and started to mush it up to a paste. I was lucky enough to get the consistency right first time, but I would definately go easy on the water, as with everything, its always easier to add water to rather than the opposite.

                    Now at this stage, it is rather yucky, as the name, caca, suggests, Lush's joke is that this is 'no sh*t' hair colour, and to be honest, it does look like something you have scooped up in a field to feed your tomatoes with, but the smell is quite natural, definate earthy and coffee scents, and not unpleasant, which is handy considering you have to plaster your head with it.

                    As long as the consistency is right, I found it no more difficult to use than an ordinary bottle dye, and actually I made less mess with this than I normally do. I segmented my hair, and wearing rubber gloves just scooped up small amounts and worked it from root to tip until all my hair was covered. I never bothered with vaseline round the hairline or anything like that, I found the product was thick enough to stay where it was put and didnt run down my face at all. A quick wipe over with damp cloth after I had piled the hair on top of my head was enough to remove any stray colour.

                    Again, the instructions were flexible on how long to leave on for, anything from a few hours, but the girl in the shop suggested, if I could, to leave it on overnight for maximum shine. I wrapped my head in clingfilm, then an old towel, then put a towel over my pillow and went to bed. I was not uncomfortable, and the smell was not offputting.

                    When I awoke in the morning, I unwrapped my head and hopped in the shower. This took a bit of time, probably about 15 to 20 minutes to completely rinse clear the colour and the henna, which some of it had dried now. The hair was left with a distinct coffee scent.

                    When I dried my hair I was most impressed, a glorious chestnut tint was left behind, which changed and shone when the sun hit it. Also worth noting if you have grey hair - I have a tiny amount - this went a wonderful coppery colour, and made my hair look as if I had delicate highlights put in.

                    I had several people comment on the fantastic condition of my hair and how they loved the colour, so I am very pleased. I have used the rest of the block now, so find that £6.95 for 3 full colourings to be fantastic value. I shall most definately be using Caca in the future.

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                      04.03.2009 04:31
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                      Use this nightmare at your own peril

                      I usually am head over heels for all Lush products, but I have to say, I *absolutely* HATED this product with a passion. The whole experience was so horrible I nearly demanded my money back from Lush.

                      The dye is unlike any safe, easy hair dye experience I've had before. You basivally mix up the henna block with boiling water into this vile paste you are expected to slather all over your hair.

                      Firstly it looked like something you'd find at the bottom of a Porta Potty and smelt just as bad. But I'd paid good money for the product so perservered.

                      Like another reviewer had said before the henna would not sink in or run through the hair it just sat there in big blobs and was very heavy when all clinfilmed to my head.

                      What they don't tell u is any little drip, drab or trickle of the substance will stain every surface beyond repair- leading to clothes, bedding & carpet being ruined. As well as sinks and baths blocked, in the end I had to resort to using a cold hosepipe in the garden to get the god-forsaken gunk off of my head!

                      To add insult to injury, I had left it 1 or 2 hours longer than recommended as my hair is very dark brown, but even then no red tones whatsoever were visible on washing it out.

                      Absolute waste of money, there are so many vegetable based dyes out there I would never go back to this eco friendly sludge masquerading as hair dye.

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                        07.02.2009 21:52
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                        As Lush say, we have to suffer for our art sometimes, don't we dears?!

                        I love Lush! I love everything about them. I am also a hair dying novice and decided to dye my hair the super natural way without the nasty chemicals of conventional products. I refuse to use products that say on the packet to ensure you flush it down the sink with plenty of water to dilute the chemicals and label themselves "harmful to aquatic life". Terrifying. Terrifying. Unnecessary.
                        I also wanted to make sure I was using a vegan product that wasn't full of animal-derived carriers and weird Frankenstein-ish ingredients since I am sure lots of those nasties could get absorbed into your scalp.

                        So about a year ago I tried to dye my hair with the henna sold in Lush, which comes in four colours: Caca Brun (deep brown), Caca Marron (chestnut red/brown), Caca Noir (black) and Caca Rouge (red). I chose the Caca Marron because my hair is a mousey, undecided light brown colour naturally and I wanted a more defined tone. I didn't want the more extreme 'caca-rouge' since I wasn't even sure a mild reddish tinge would suit me! And these natural products can vary in their results according to your own hair tone (even more than conventional dyes). If your hair is grey it works rather spectacularly by speckling bright red bits on the grey.

                        So what is henna?

                        Well, it is also important to remember that whatever colour you're aiming for or currently have, all the Lush hennas, and all proper henna based products for that matter, come out with a reddish tinge. This is because henna is a plant which grows in the tropics and produces the a red-orange dye molecule called lawsone, which is particularly known for its ability to bond well with proteins such as skin, hair, leather, wool and other fabrics. Hence, all henna is technically red henna, though black hennas can be produced either using indigo (plant based, as Lush does) or from a nasty chemical called PPD which is laced into some cheap or synthetic hair dyes, including hennas. It can cause anywhere from 3-15% allergic reactions in people and thus henna boosted with PPD or any dubious looking hair dye should be readily avoided!

                        What goes into Lush's Caca Marron and other dyes?

                        That said, Lush have done their utmost to ensure their hair dyes are not bad for you or your hair and actually claim it can improve your hair lustre! I can verify that! So they add a few nourishing bits and bobs and create a block of 6 squares containing:

                        Red Henna (Lawsonia inermis), Cocoa Butter (Theobroma cacao), Indigo Herb (Fera tinctoria), Ground Coffee (Coffea arabica), Fresh Organic Lemon Juice (Citrus limonum), Irish Moss Powder (Chondrus crispus), Clove Bud Oil (Eugenia caryophyllus), *Citral, *Eugenol, *Geraniol, *Citronellol, *Limonene, *Linalool, Perfume
                        * Occurs naturally in Essential Oils

                        Lush are rather proud of where the name "Caca Marron" comes from too: Caca being French for 'poo'! Though they hasten to add that unlike most hair dyes their 'Les Cacas' are not full of sh*t! Hehehe. Nice! It does smell very weird though, even before you mix it with anything, but I wouldn't describe it as a bad smell particularly. It's kind of like musty, though I can definitely smell the coffee grinds...it can be overpowering after a few hours on your head, but I kind of like it.

                        The method
                        What you need:

                        -a pair or two of rubber or latex gloves (if you buy it from the store, they may give you a few)
                        - a non-staining bowl (e.g. pyrex) and a grater/saucepan.
                        -cling film
                        -newspaper
                        -moisturiser or vaseline

                        Now this is the bit that puts most people off. Conventional hair dyes take, what, 20 minutes? This can take anywhere up to 12 hours (though it is suggested 1-4 hours) plus the time it takes for you to prepare the mixture. But the finished colour is rather sublime, so take an afternoon or an evening out of your week and enjoy!

                        Ok so then you can prepare it in two ways. Grate the big bar and add boiling water or melt it with water over a bain-marie (bowl in a saucepan of water!). When you have gloopy, sticky paste (rather looks like poo actually!), set newspaper all over the floor and potentially strip off topless to make sure your clothes don't stain! Or be boring and use some old towels. Moisturise your hairline or use Vaseline so that the henna doesn't get in contact with your skin. I had a bit of an orangey glow at the top of my forehead for a few days because I was a bit stingy with it! Slick it on your hair, somehow, and then swirl the cling film around your head until firmly in place. Lush say that you should wear the cling film if you want a redder colour and don't if you want a more brunette colour, but I have no idea how you could move for the next few hours without cling film! Stray pieces of henna fly off your head onto the carpet so beware...pick them up immediately!

                        Then, leave for as many hours as you wish. I made the mistake of using it only for an hour or two the first time and the colour was a bit disappointing. The second time I left it for 4 ½ hours and it has been wonderful! But next time I would probably do it overnight and sleep with cling film on my head so that I could see some more powerful results after a good 8 hours kip!

                        Wash off , leave someone else to clean the shower (!) and wallah! Radiant colour and shine will develop for the next few hours until you get a nice strong colour. Mine is very chestnut coloured in the sunlight and generally a shade or two darker all the time. It is definitely what I was aiming for, though I plan to use again very soon to make sure it lasts!

                        Price

                        Its about £6.95 for a block. So I would say that is about the same price as a moderate-good quality synthetic dye (as opposed to own brands and such). I think it is very good value really. Also, it is brilliant comedy to be walking round for a day looking like a Martian with your head wrapped in cling film. Cue some hilarious photographs!

                        Verdict?

                        If you want a subtle or strong chestnut brown/red colour, this is the henna to go for. I can't fault Lush! This is the first time I have used henna for enough time during the method to gain a noticeable result so it is difficult to be precise about how long it is meant to or will last on your hair. So far it has been about 3 weeks since the application and it is still as vibrant as before. However, from general advice and reading reviews on the Lush website, I would suggest that the vibrancy and strong reddish colour will last maybe a month or two more (another application would extend this). The general shade or two darker it makes your hair will probably last until it has grown out, although again this depends on the success of your dyeing method and how often you wash your hair etc. I would love to be more precise but the natural nature of this product means you really just have to go with the flow!

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                      • Product Details

                        Give your hair a new look with a dark red, rich chestnut brown colour /