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Forge Steel Fibreglass Shaft Claw Hammer 16oz

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1 Review

Brand: Forge Steel / Product Type: Claw Hammer

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      23.06.2012 15:47
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

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      Good solid hammer that does well for home DIY uses and doesn't cost too much.

      I got this hammer a few months back to add to the small but steadily growing collection of tools that are 'mine'. It was bought at my husband's suggestion as he thought that anything heavier might be too much for me, but anything lighter might be just a bit too lightweight for the job as it were.

      Cost
      This is a fairly cheap hammer and cost just £7 from Screwfix. I find this quite a good place to go for cheap but useable tools and other DIY equipment.

      Construction
      This is a two piece construction with the head made from drop forged steel and the handle made from fibreglass. The reason for going for a fibreglass handle is that it absorbs the shock a lot better than a wooden or metal handle would which means if you're hitting something hard with it as you'd expect to with a hammer, you're not going to get too much force bouncing back up your arm.

      I chose to have a claw hammer so that as well as using this for banging nails etc. in, I'd have the ability to use it for removing them too. The head of the hammer has two sides - you get the hammer part and the other end which is a sort of two pronged claw for pulling nails with.

      Usage
      In terms of hammering things in I doubt there's much I can tell many people - except possibly to tell you of an old trick taught to me by someone many years ago to help you avoid hammering your fingers. What you do is to pop the nail through a bit of cardboard and then hold the cardboard instead of holding the nail while you start hammering. Once the nail is partly in place, pull the card off the nail ruining the card, and you've got a nail that's in place without you having to risk your fingers!

      The claw at the other end of the hammer head is used for removing the nails. You slot the claws either side of the nail with the flat head of the nail sticking out. The head has a gentle curve to the prongs so that when you lean the hammer back you can use the force against the wall to remove the nail rather than having to just pull.

      My Experiences With This
      When you build a dolls house, mostly they come flat packed and are glued together. Having said that, it's quite useful to hammer small nails (tacks) in to hold the boards together lightly while the glue is setting. This would be the first purpose I've used this for with much success.

      I don't use this for much around the house, but it's been used by me to put up a mirror in the bathroom, and by hubby to do a few other jobs - it being nearer to hand than his own hammer and toolbox at the time!

      Over all, I'd say this is a reasonable hammer to have in your toolbox for lightweight jobs. It's not really hefty enough for anything more than general DIY, but is perfectly acceptable for that and won't set you back too much in the process.

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    • Product Details

      "High quality tool with fibreglass handle and full polished head / Features: Drop-Forged Steel; Bi-Material Soft-Grip Handle; 2-Piece Construction."