Welcome! Log in or Register

Compaq iPaq Pocket PC H3630

  • image
9 Reviews
  • limited colour compared with other PDAs
  • Power drains out so quickly
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    9 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      07.05.2002 01:23

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      • "limited colour compared with other PDAs"

      Work supply these - if it were my choice, I'd go for the Toshiba (with an extra charger!) - Advantages: Functionality, Style / Design, Good Battery Life - Disadvantages: Size (Especially with exapnsion jackets), Limited expansion without resorting to jackets, limited colour compared with other PDAs

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      18.11.2001 07:53

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      • "Power drains out so quickly"

      The best PDA that i've used - Advantages: Colour screen, A lot of accessories available for this machine, Almost the same functionality as an lap top/notebook - Disadvantages: Expansion jacket and extra compact flash memory very expensive, Compact flash modem too expensive, Power drains out so quickly

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      21.06.2001 23:53
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      I’ve almost written about every electronic device or appliance that I possess, expect for my PDA, which I got during the first week of this month. I work in the Export business so the company decided to replace my existing Laptop with a newer version. I suggested that we go for the PDA due to its high reviews and compact size. After a lot of deliberations and looking around and reading some of the opinions on this site, I settled for a Compaq iPAQ H3630 Pocket PC. The cost was STG.320.00 which many may find expensive. This pocket PC is amazing. It has 16 MB of ROM, which holds the Win CE operating system. It has 32 MB of RAM, which is for your data storage and any other programs you might want to install. It is very lightweight and compact and weighs just 6 ounces. A very important feature is that you can allocate how much of the 32MB you want for your data storage and how much you want for your additional programs. The operating speed and performance is just brilliant and it has a 206 MHz Intel processor. You can run several programs at once without losing out on the performance. The looks also are just great. Very eye catching with its silver casing. You get a lot of envious looks. The colour display is probably what sets it apart from the rest. The spec is a LCD 4096 with 240 x 320 version. The screen is clearly visible even in adverse light conditions. Other features include -Infrared port in order to communicate with other iPAQ users or with your mobile phone. -Headphone jack for listening to MP3’s. -Expansion slot that can be used for adding memory, checking your e-mail and surfing the net. -Voice Recorder for recording memos and notes. -Windows CE operating system -Software: Pocket Word, Excel and IE Explorer. The speakers, though very small, produce excellent sound quality whilst playing music or recording your messages. The iPaq comes with a docking cradle that charges the unit, with the included AC adapter. and connects it to the PC. Once you set up the ActiveSync software on your PC, you use the cradle to synchronize your iPaq calendar and contacts with your PC. Also to download files to the iPaq from your PC. There is also an adapter that allows you to charge the iPaq's battery in your car. The internal battery is fully rechargeable and I usually get about 8 hours of usage out of a full charge. It is equipped with a light sensor that adjusts the screen lighting depending on the light conditions at the time of use. This saves on the battery power leading longer usage. The CD that comes with this product includes a handwriting recognition software. Once installed and programmed then this will convert your script to text. Basically you just need to write neatly. I have found the iPAQ very useful to store my calendar, schedules, grocery lists, phone numbers, e-mail addresses and contacts. Also the option of being able to go on the Internet, no matter where you are in the country. This will definitely be of use too most people at some stage or the other. I am sure that there are still many things that I have still not covered but there you go, that just shows you why this is such a good machine.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        19.06.2001 20:58

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        I recently got my hands on an ipaq and was really impressed by the power. Model H3630 come with 32 MB of memory, which is quite a bit to begin with. The size and wait was really nice, not too heavy and not too wide. When powering on the screen was really nice and clear unlike other pda and the contract and light control was really cool because it gave you the best image all the time. I then went and try some software (freeware stuff) and I was blown away with the games. I played quake and chopper alley demo that made me thinks of the quality of programming for these little devices. I must admit one think is that the installation too alot of memory space and you have to remember that memory space and data spaces are shared. The control looked nice and feels as if you have a D-pad. I think pocket PC are getting more like little game consoles and still be a business application. I know most of you already know that it has pocket outlook and other application, but soon there will be killer application available like the ones that are being test. Motor sport engine tuning, pilot navigator, GPS track for traveller and many more. I think that the ipaq is the replacement for the palm and soon every household will have one of these devices. This device will be connected via bluetooth with GPRS. As for the design the stylus pen has a push button to relase it and slides into the ipaq it self. The processor is arm and runs around 204 mhz. Currently the ipaq is over charged and we should soon see a drop in prices in the future.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        23.05.2001 04:03

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Key Features: 240x320 touch-sensitive colour LCD, 206MHz 32-Bit Intel StrongARM processor, 32Mb RAM (expandable via Compact Flash), 16Mb ROM, Microsoft Windows for Pocket PC, handwriting recognition (with predictive text), voice memo, IR port, USB connection/docking cradle, Software: Pocket Word, Excel, Outlook, Money, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Reader (with ClearType), Windows Media Player Everybody's talking about Compaq's new Pocket PC, and T3 can't keep its hands off this latest Windows-fuelled PDA Beam me up Scottie! And all that Star Trek malarky, cos Compaq's iPAQ looks like something straight off the pages of Captain Kirk's Log. Slim and futuristically metallic, this new e-organiser is the latest handheld to feature Microsoft's rebranded WinCE operating system, which is fine by us. Now dubbed 'Windows for Pocket PC', this Gates-ware can run familiar Windows applications such as Word, Excel and Internet Explorer. Admittedly, these are stripped down versions of the PC originals. But they help transform the iPAQ from a full-colour info tablet into a versatile mobile office and multimedia companion. If the previous best-of-Pocket-PC-breed was Hewlett Packard's Jornada ),then the iPAQ is better in almost every way. Where Windows-based PDAs used to lag the powerful simplicity of their Palm counterparts, things have changed dramatically. Everything that Palm used to get right - size, flexibility, handwriting recognition, third-party software support - the Pocket PC now matches with a smug grin. Admittedly, the Windows OS is still unnecessarily complicated, a hereditary complaint passed on from the desktop original. But once you get used to its knotty structure, you find that you have a system that can do so J H much more than calendaring and contacts management. Why fritter away 32Mb of memory on names and addresses when it can also be used for electronic books, MP3 files or games? The design
        retains the familiar, quick-launch application buttons and 240x320 pixel touch-sensitive, colour LCD but also features a unique, gamepad-style cursor pad, with eight-directional control plus an integrated loudspeaker. On top, you'll find a headphones jack, stylus slot and an IR port for wireless data connections. On the bottom, Compaq has replaced a Compact Flash slot with its own expansion interface. Additional CF or PCMCIA power, therefore, comes wired into plastic 'jackets' (optional) which can be slipped over the iPAQ's silver shell. These jackets give extra functionality but add significantly to the PDA's size and weight. On the inside, the iPAQ's multiple talents are powered by a 206MHz, 32-bit Intel StrongARM processor - considerably speedier than the 133MHz chip that drives HP's Jornada Pocket PC. Fire up any of the core apps (stored on an internal 16Mb ROM) and the difference is astonishing. The 'pocket' versions of Microsoft Word, Excel, Money, Outlook and Internet Explorer are all slicker and quicker, providing familiar PC-style functionality. The speed-boost is really noticeable in the weightier programs. Picture Viewer, for example, enables you to display full-colour JPEG images, and PVsplash provides support for streaming video. Lastly, the Microsoft Reader can effortlessly display e-books, while the Windows Media Player is capable of MP3, WMA and .WAV file playback. True, the internal speaker isn't up to much, but that's why the iPAQ has a headphones socket. Bar the strange, jacket-based expansion system, the iPAQ is a joy to use. Interfacing the device with your PC is idiot-proof, achieved via a high-speed USB connection and a docking cradle. Meanwhile, software transfer and info-synchronisation is managed by Microsoft's own ActiveSync program. In this way, you can transfer e-texts to read on the move, or pipe music files across to transform the iPAQ into a basic MP3 player. A number of g
        ames are also available (including Golf and Pac-Man), while third-party software can be downloaded to add WAP support to the PDA's existing Net skills. With all this choice, 32Mb of memory doesn't seem enough. Despite the complexities of the Windows OS, the iPAQ provides a classy mobile computing option. It's a dramatic improvement over the clunky WinCE handhelds of old - from the eight-hour battery life to the wide range of Windows-compatible programs. What ultimately impresses you about the iPAQ, however, is the detail. This H3650 model, for example, features a light sensor that can adjust the LCD brightness according to how much natural light there is, and a voice memo facility with one-touch recording. Finally, a word about the intuitive handwriting recognition software. This is not only quick and incredibly easy to use (with a text prediction function) it's also surprisingly accurate, providing an excellent and natural way to enter information. The iPAQ definitely turns heads with its powerful functionality and silvery good looks. It's arguably the best Pocket PC currently available, despite the fact that the expansion casings give it the electronic equivalent of a fat, blubbery ass. Once so boosted, it's not exactly pocket-friendly, and there are cling-ons on the starboard bow. Your alternatives are either to buy a new Palm PDA, Sony's planned handheld, or to wait for something more futuristic such as Mitsubishi's Trium Mondo - a next-gen super-gadget that's half Windows-powered e-organiser, half-GSM/GPRS mobile phone. With one eye on the future, even this brand new Pocket PC can start to seem a little two-dimensional. On the inside, the iPAQ's multiple talents are powered by a 206MHz, 32-bit Intel StrongARM processor - considerably speedier than the 133MHz chip that drives HP's Jornada Pocket PC. Fire up any of the core apps (stored on an internal 16Mb ROM) and the difference is astonishing. The '
        pocket' versions of Microsoft Word, Excel, Money, Outlook and Internet Explorer are all slicker and quicker, providing familiar PC-style functionality. The speed-boost is really noticeable in the weightier programs. Picture Viewer, for example, enables you to display full-colour JPEG images, and PVsplash provides support for streaming video. Lastly, the Microsoft Reader can effortlessly display e-books, while the Windows Media Player is capable of MP3, WMA and .WAV file playback. True, the internal speaker isn't up to much, but that's why the iPAQ has a headphones socket. Bar the strange, jacket-based expansion system, the iPAQ is a joy to use. Interfacing the device with your PC is idiot-proof, achieved via a high-speed USB connection and a docking cradle. Meanwhile, software transfer and info-synchronisation is managed by Microsoft's own ActiveSync program. In this way, you can transfer e-texts to read on the move, or pipe music files across to transform the iPAQ into a basic MP3 player. A number of games are also available (including Golf and Pac-Man), while third-party software can be downloaded to add WAP support to the PDA's existing Net skills. With all this choice, 32Mb of memory doesn't seem enough. Despite the complexities of the Windows OS, the iPAQ provides a classy mobile computing option. It's a dramatic improvement over the clunky WinCE handhelds of old - from the eight-hour battery life to the wide range of Windows-compatible programs. What ultimately impresses you about the iPAQ, however, is the detail. This H3650 model, for example, features a light sensor that can adjust the LCD brightness according to how much natural light there is, and a voice memo facility with one-touch recording. Finally, a word about the intuitive handwriting recognition software. This is not only quick and incredibly easy to use (with a text prediction function) it's also surprisingly accurate, providing an excellent and natura
        l way to enter information. The iPAQ definitely turns heads with its powerful functionality and silvery good looks. It's arguably the best Pocket PC currently available, despite the fact that the expansion casings give it the electronic equivalent of a fat, blubbery ass. Once so boosted, it's not exactly pocket-friendly, and there are cling-ons on the starboard bow. Your alternatives are either to buy a new Palm PDA, Sony's planned handheld, or to wait for something more futuristic such as Mitsubishi's Trium Mondo - a next-gen super-gadget that's half Windows-powered e-organiser, half-GSM/GPRS mobile phone. With one eye on the future, even this brand new Pocket PC can start to seem a little two-dimensional.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        07.05.2001 16:53
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        I was one of the cynics - make an appointment with anyone with a PDA or similar and it was hard work. A diary with a removable address section and a small notebook and pen and I figured I was as well organised as anyone. Our new IT guru persuaded me to try the iPAQ and I apprehensively put away my diary etc. and tried to operate only with the handheld. I subsequently found myself 'selling' it to everyone who saw me suing it! If I could have got hold of stock, I would have shifted about 60 units! (Incidentally we tried for twenty but could only by ten @ £350 - so presumably availability is a problem). So what do I like? The synchronisation with Outlook and through AvantGo my chosen web sites I find useful. I love the handwriting notes - with or without the use of the templates. Best of all is the calendar and the address synchronisation - links to my 'phone too. The boot speed is unbelievable and with chargers in the car - a spare at home and one for the briefcase, I have rarely suffered battery power issues. More memory is now available and some of the small but neat programmes like street maps and the tube are just ideal for this one stop shop info centre. Criticisms? Well, my preferred diary view doesn't exist (month at a view with summary activities for each day) and the infrared transfer is not brilliant. Overall, I am sticking with it - but I confess a carry a very small diary with my month at a view as well. Damn!

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        06.05.2001 21:28

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        • "Batery life good
        • but it loses everything if you leave it unconnected to power for too long (1 week ie hols!)"

        If it doesnt work, what use is it ! - Advantages: Handwriting software great, Colour good, Toch screen good - Disadvantages: Syncronisation with MS (Outllok etc) doesnt work and Compaq cant help, Too expensive, Batery life good, but it loses everything if you leave it unconnected to power for too long (1 week ie hols!)

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        02.05.2001 22:23

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        This little gem has bene inmy posession for four months and I am only just beginning to learn the value of it. Okay it has Windows CE plus pocket versions of Word and Excel (both excellent), but where this product comes into its' own is 3 different things: 1. AvantGo channels - where you can get your PDA updated with updates from major websites and then read articles from such sites as Bloomberg, Reuters, BBC, Guardian, Telegraph, Economist and many others. This is invaluable to me for getting news as I don;t have time during work to browse and can read all the main stories of the day on my way home on the tube. This machine is worth half its price just on this little feature. 2.Appointmets/Calendar - having a hectic meeting schedule every week emans i need to the detials of this schedule with me or be readily updatebable. The Ipaq's interaction iwth Outlook allows meto do just that, either from home or at work. 3.Upgrade-ability - The fact I can use this little baby as a mobile phone is good enough reason for anyone to buy it - albeit at a fairly high cost (pick it up cheaper abroad) - it will aloow you to keep your ipaq updated wherever you are in the world. As for the battery issue - as I am a pretty heavy user - I only get a day and a half usage ouyt of it - which is a little annoying. with new battery technolog, one woudl assume they could have built in slightly longer battery life.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        26.03.2001 20:43
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        This review has been written after three months intensive use of the iPAQ. I’ve found it to be a very reliable machine, with a vast range of features. My questions would be about the general useability of PDAs, and at the end of the review I’ve expressed some concerns about the concept – would you drag your PDA out of the briefcase on a wet windy day, in a dodgy part of London for example! The best features of the iPAQ in my view are the PC synchronisation features, and the screen. Other PDAs allow full connectivity with MS Office of course, but the iPAQ really works well with Office. I love the way I can select synchronisation settings for various parts of Outlook. For example, I can synchronise Tasks, Diary and Calendar, but leave Intray unchecked unless I’m going away for a while or need to do some work away from base on email. I never have to anything at all to synchronise the machine, just stick it in the cradle (serial connection to the PC), and it just does it. The moment I change an appointment or any other item on the PC, the little green icon lights up on the PC’s system tray and the data is updated. And vice versa too, so if I’m away from base, I just key in a new appointment, task or contact and it updates the PC as soon as I stick it back in the cradle. The colour screen is just beautiful. It is very high definition, making sense of the smallest graphical detail, and also coming with six back-light settings, from the lowest powersave dim light, to the “super bright” which for short periods of use in daylight, or under fluorescent lights, lets the display shine out really clearly. There is also an “Automatic” mode which adjusts the light according to the conditions at the time. The touch-screen system works really well. I find I can operate it with a finger and rarely have to use the stylus (which slots into the body of the machine and is released by a
        small button when you need it). The iPAQ has been criticised in comparative tests for having a poor battery life, but whether this is a problem or not will depend on your usage of it. I can take it home on Friday night, use it quite a bit over the weekend, and it still seems to have plenty of power left when I stick it in the cradle connected to my office PC on Monday morning. Certainly battery life has not been a problem for me. Neither has reliability, although magazine reviews seem to suggest that this can be a problem. I have two colleagues with iPAQs and we’ve not had any problems. Inputting data is relatively straightforward. You can bring up a keyboard window which you tap with the stylus, or alternatively you can write into a small template, which requires you to learn the letter shapes. A handwriting recognition program is available for free download but I tried it and found disappointingly that it does not work with the installed version of Word and was hardly worth the bother. Infrared is a little difficult to configure with a PC, but great for swapping data with other iPAQ owners of course. You may have seen people exchanging business cards in this way. Slightly “toys for the boys” but no doubt we’ll all be doing this before too long. The sound notes function works really well although of course the speakers performance is severely limited by its size. The iPAQ comes with Pocket WORD and EXCEL of course and these work just fine. Other apps are Microsoft Reader (for e-books), Internet Explorer (for which a modem is required of course), MS Money, Picture Viewer, and various accessories. Pocket Streets was installed on my machine and I went on the MS Website on my PC and downloaded street maps for London. The installation of these was really easy, as the so long as the iPAQ is in its cradle, the installation program handles the installation right through to
        the iPAQ. By the way, this application is really good, allowing fully searchable street maps, zoomable and configurable also, to show post offices, banks, tube stations, cultural attractions etc, etc. OK, I admit it, I also downloaded Tetris. This makes the iPAQ behave like a Colour Game Boy, the control button at the bottom of the machine then enabling you to nudge and rotate just like on the real thing. The iPAQ has a nice feeling of solidity about it and in terms of the casing, beats other PDA’s hands down – heck, it LOOKS a quality machine. Now, having used this for three months, I need to ask myself if its worth the bother of running it. I THINK the answer is yes, but I have to admit, I don’t really use it very much. The best thing about it is running off to a meeting at work, I just whip the thing out of its cradle and then I have in my hand everything I need in terms of “organiser” information. But if that’s the only thing I really use it for, then I have to say, I could fairly easily print off the diary and task details from my PC Outlook and then type up any updates when I return to the office – it wouldn’t be THAT difficult would it? The biggest drawback with PDAs is data entry. While the machines are good for retrieving information, its very nimble person who can realistically write anything into them other than the briefest of notes. The irritation value is considerable! Also, when you suddenly need to fix a meeting with someone, to actually put it quickly into the iPAQ is very difficult and it’s a little wearing to get sarcastic comments from a paper and pen person as you struggle with the stylus on that tiny keyboard window. The Pocket street maps are great, but what if its raining? The machine’s not being brought out of the briefcase on wet days, and what about the potential for mugging too? A bit dodgy I think. Then with such high value equ
        ipment in such a small package, would you be prepared to take it abroad with you? Would you dare leave it in an hotel room for instance? Just recently I find myself leaving the iPAQ in the drawer some days, then I rediscover it again and start using it. So overall, its dispensable, and I’m not sure if I’d be happy with forking out the purchase price myself. Good job my employer provided it and not me!

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • Product Details

        The iPAQ H3630/H3660 Pocket PCs are designed to go everywhere with you - at work, at play and traveling. They're not much bigger than a calculator and come standard with applications like Microsoft Pocket Word, Excel, Outlook, Internet Explorer, and Windows Media Player. Do more with their modular system of slide-on Expansion Packs. Use the PC Card Expansion Pack to connect to get your e-mail or connect to the Internet to put critical information at your fingertips. Whatever you choose to do, you can do it with the iPAQ Pocket PC.

        Technical Data

        Product Description: Compaq iPAQ Pocket PC H3630 - handheld - Pocket PC - 3.8"
        Product Type: Handheld
        Operating System: Microsoft Pocket PC
        Display: 3.8" colour TFT - 240 x 320
        Processor: Intel SA-1110
        Processor Clock Speed: 206 MHz
        RAM: 32 MB
        Battery Run Time: Up to 12 hours
        Dimensions (WxDxH): 8.3 cm x 1.6 cm x 13 cm
        Weight: 179 g
        Localisation: English / Hong Kong, Singapore, United Kingdom
        Manufacturer Warranty: 1 year warranty
        More