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Aspirin Enteric Coated

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      06.11.2010 12:53
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      Maybe it's time to bring this back into the medicine cabinet for adults.

      Aspirin is one of the oldest of a group of drugs referred to as non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. Aspirin as we know has been around since the 1800's but the natural form of it, derived from willow bark was used in ancient Greece. The first tablets were made by Bayer Pharmaceutical in 1897 , and named aspirin by the company.

      Aspirin was once the drug of choice for all minor aches and pains as well as fever. Just as routinely as we now dose children with Calpol, we used to use baby aspirin, but the drug fell out of favour when it was linked to a rare but extremely dangerous illness known as Reye's Syndrome which affects children and teenagers. Reyes syndrome can result in death or permanent damage to the brain or liver. Overuse of aspirin may also have been partially responsible for the high death toll during the Spanish Flu, and aspirin is commonly linked to intestinal bleeding as well.

      For all of these reasons, aspirin is much less popular then it used to be, but it still has some purposes that can not easily be matched by other drugs. It is usually used in smaller doses now and must not be used by teenagers or children or breastfeeding mothers.

      ASPIRIN AND MISCARRIAGE

      Aspirin is not recommended during routine pregnancy because it reduces the bodies production of something called thromboxane, which helps your blood clot. Especially when giving birth you do not want to bleed excessively. But for some women , like myself, the body over reacts to everything and too much clotting cuts off the babies blood supply through the umbilical cord. In these cases aspirin can make the difference between life and death for the unborn child. As requirement to be given a rather expensive treatment option of heparin or clexane injections with aspirin. You must attempt one pregnancy with aspirin alone. In my case the aspirin alone was unsuccessful, but low dose aspirin is meant to increase blood flow to the uterus, reducing the chances of blood clotting related miscarriage,and many women have reported success with this method. Combined with injected blood thinners though aspirin greatly increases the chance of a successful pregnancy, and I have two beautiful sons as a result, so aspirin still holds it's title as a wonder drug to me! I do think the clexane was more important in saving my pregnancies, but aspirin may also have played it's role.

      I am currently prescribed aspirin because of auto immune disorders including antiphospholipid syndrome. Low dose aspirin like these have many current uses including reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke ( this does not take the place of a healthy lifestyle though). But because most people so rarely use aspirin now, it seems to have a stronger effect then drugs that are used everyday. Anadin works so well for headaches because it also contains aspirin. Its also over priced though and combining one of these with a tesco paracetamol and a cup of tea will have the same effect. Even used alone, my husband has found these to be the best headache tablets when I ran out of paracetamol and did not tell him. Aspirin is also more effective for treating fever, and swelling in adults then paracetamol.

      If taking aspirin I would recommend using the coated ones like this. They are easy to swallow and less likely to upset your stomache. Do read the package for contraindications, but for most people, these might be worth a try for that stubborn headaches, fevers or swollen joints.
      Discuss the possibility of using aspirin with your doctor before long term therapy for heart attack risk, stroke risk, or miscarriage.

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        17.09.2008 11:35

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        a solution to a distended abdomen

        i have been on prescribed aspirin enteric coated 75mg for 3 years ialso take 10mg omeprazole could there be a reaction. I have suffered with a distended abdomen and bloating for three years and am wondering if this could be a contributing factor. I have exhausted all medical tests and found no reason. One of the doctors in my practise thinks I am swallowing air. As I also suffer with emphysema I find my swollen stomach makes breathing more difficult. I am of slim build but my stomach is very swollen and hard. I am hoping you can offer some advice. I have also had throat cancer which was treated with surgery and radiotherapy. This has resulted in very little saliva and very little sense of taste as the the saliva glands and the taste buds were zapped by the radiotherapy. My lower jaw bone was also split for the surgery and that combined with the radiotherapy has made the bone crumbly so I lost all my crowns and have been unable to have bottom teeth successfully fitted. I would be grateful for any assistance you can give

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        01.07.2004 03:12
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        Aspirin was once the wonder drug to be kept in every medicine cabinet and I am not going to say it isn't an effective painkiller because it is. However, I have my doubts as to whether it should be a first choice over paracetamol for example. Let me explain why. What is aspirin? ****************** Extracted from willow bark (don't you just love the net!) aspirin is made from the chemical salicin (also present in wart treatments which burn the wart, pointless fact 1!). Aspirin has been used for hundreds of years to ease aches and pains and reduce fevers and some even suggest it has was first used around 500 BC (pointless fact 2!). It has also recently been prescribed to stabilise blood pressure during pregnancy. How does it work? ******************** Aspirin restricts cells from making prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are the chemicals responsible for making us feel strong pain sensations. What's the problem then? **************************** Well another effect of aspirin is it reduces the viscosity (get you Dave!) or thickness of the blood. This is a benefit in those with heart conditions and as such aspirin is often prescribed for this. However, aspirin disolves the lining of the stomach and this can cause gastro intestinal bleeding and if an undiagnosed ulcer is present severe hemorrhaging! Should I not take it then? *************************** If aspirin works for you and you are certain you have no stomach problems then great! However, be wary of the side effects. I have already mentioned bleeding internally but did you know that people who regularly take aspirin can have problems stopping external bleeding too. Nausea and vomiting can also be a problem. Is it safe for children? *********************** No, no and thrice no! Aspirin is to be avoided like the plague in children as it may cause Reye's Syndrome which is a potent
        ially deadly organ disease. What forms does it come in? ******************************** Aspirin is available in a dispersible tablet (dissolved in water), or an enteric coated tablet (dissolves slowly in the bloodstream). The enteric coated tablets are often more expensive but are thought to be less damaging long term. Doses vary from 75, 125 and 300mg. Typically bought as 300mg and prescribed at a starting dose of 75mg. How much are they? *********************** Very cheap! Boots sell 16 dispersibles for 39p although enteric coated tablets such as anadin are more around £4. What is your experience Dave? ********************************** I have used them in the past and they are an effective, quick acting painkiller (due to their soluble nature you are talking about half an hour). I would say if you can't take paracetamol then these are an effective alternative. However, as Paracetamol has a lesser risk regarding gastro intestinal bleeds unless you are prescribed this it is not the best choice as a painkiller.

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          01.07.2002 22:57
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          We all know what aspirin is, don't we? A common painkiller, a slightly old-fashioned headache pill, cheap, ubiquitous, easily available. Its something we take for granted, and usually think nothing of. However, it is a medicine that I had not taken until recently - having followed my mum?s habit of taking paracetamol or ibuprofen instead - when I was recommended to try it by a nurse at my local clinic for the relief of pain from a sprained knee. I must admit I found this rather strange, as I had always assumed that ibuprofen was somehow better, stronger and safer to use for such treatment. But it appears that I was wrong! ● What exactly is aspirin? Those little white tablets are synthesised from a chemical compound called acetylsalicylic acid, the active component of which is salicylic acid (a substance found in willow bark, and used for relieving pain and fever by both the ancient Greeks and Native Americans). Aspirin as we now recognize it has been around since the 1890's. ● How does it work? Aspirin is an analgesic - this means that it can relieve pain without loss of consciousness. It is also classed as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, so it can reduce inflammation and swelling as well as pain. Pain and inflammation in conditions such as period cramps, sprains and infection are caused by hormones called prostaglandins, which are released by the body and cause blood vessels to contract in the affected area - they can also cause the smooth muscle in the uterus to contract. Aspirin works at the site of tissue damage to reduce prostaglandin production, by inhibiting an enzyme vital to their manufacture. As it is the contraction of blood vessels that causes swelling, aspirin therefore reduces the inflammation and eases pain. This makes aspirin useful for treating injuries, joint swelling, period pain, dental pain and arthritis as well as for headaches. ● What are
          the side effects? It is quite well known now that aspirin can irritate the lining of the stomach and cause small amounts of gastrointestinal bleeding - I suspect this is why my mother never used the stuff! However, this is not as scary as it sounds, and damage (loss of iron and occasionally ulcers) can only occur with prolonged, heavy usage of aspirin. It is always a good idea to take aspirin on a full stomach with plenty of liquid, to reduce irritation though, and if you are at all worried then buy coated aspirin tablets that are more expensive, but avoid these complications. I should also mention here that aspirin should not be given to children, except on explicit medical advice. This is because it is thought to increase the risk of contracting the rare (and sometimes fatal) Reye's Syndrome, which can cause liver problems, high fever and swelling of brain cells. Although the cause of this illness is unknown, it only occurs in children and teenagers after they have had a virus - the administration of aspirin has been found to occur in a statistically significant number of these patients. It is therefore safer to use paracetamol or ibuprofen that has been specifically designed for children (such as Calpol) instead (see http://www.reyessyndrome.org/). You should talk to a doctor or pharmacist before taking aspirin if: - you are pregnant or breastfeeding - you have liver or kidney problems - you are haemophiliac - you are taking medicine for blood pressure, anticoagulants, epilepsy or diabetes - you have previously had a stomach ulcer - you are asthmatic ● What about overdose? It is very important that you read the information leaflet enclosed with your packet of aspirin, and that you never exceed the stated dosage. If you take regular small doses of aspirin and you miss a dose, never try to compensate by "doubling up" the next dose, as this can be harmful. Aspirin overdose is
          dangerous because the patient shows very little symptoms at first - by the time they become ill, then serious harm (such as liver damage) could have occurred. If you take an overdose (or suspect that someone else has done) it is vital that hospital treatment is sought - never try to induce vomiting, as this is ineffective and can cause further harm. ● The good news OK, scary bit over - before you rush to throw out your aspirin, there are some benefits to using this medicine. The first is that it is incredibly cheap and widely available; I bought a pack of 16 tablets from Sainsbury's last week for only 19p! A second plus is that it has been found that aspirin has an effect on blood platelets, inhibiting clotting and "thinning" the blood. This becomes important when you consider that heart attacks can be caused by a clot in one of the main arteries delivering blood to the organ (a coronary thrombosis). A study in the UK in 1993 demonstrated that taking just half an aspirin tablet a day long-term could reduce the chance of stroke and thrombosis in high-risk patients, and help prevent post-operative clots forming (source - Microsoft Encarta 2000). The Red Cross also recommends that those trained in first aid should give an aspirin tablet (with no water) to heart attack patients as soon as possible as "it may help to limit the damage to the heart" (Red Cross First Aid Manual, sixth edition, page 73). A more recently discovered benefit has come from research in the USA, where it found that regular aspirin use could reduce the risk of lung and colon cancer (see http://www.aspirin.org/news/ap_o.pdf), slow the formation of cataracts (see http://www.jr2.ox.ac.uk/bandolier/band92/b92-3.html) and possibly prevent migraines (see http://www.walgreens.com/library/feature/feat043002.jhtml). ● My experience As I mentioned at the beginning of this review, the reason for my taking aspirin wa
          s because of a sprained knee. I had being trying to reduce the pain and swelling with ibuprofen, as this is the painkiller I normally have in the house for treating headaches. While I normally find ibuprofen to be very effective, it wasn't helping my knee at all and I was finding it very painful to walk, even a week after the injury occurred. After being advised to try aspirin by the nurse I saw, I bought some from Superdrug on the way home - I paid around 25p for a pack of 16 own-brand tablets. Aspirin tastes very bitter, so I recommend taking it with a flavoured drink to help disguise the taste. Normal strength tablets are 300mg, and you take one or two in each dose, leaving at least 4 hours between doses. Maximum safe dose is 12 tablets in 24 hours. I must say that I was surprised by how effective such a cheap medicine could be! Used in combination with an ice-pack, it really helped to get the swelling down on my injured knee, and eased the pain enough for me to be able to move around without pulling silly faces at every step. Funnily enough though, I have since taken it to ease headaches and found it to work less well than my usual ibuprofen. I would therefore recommend aspirin for any adults with sprains, strains, joint problems, period pain, muscle pain or dental pain - but not really for headaches! As always, thanks for reading and rating. :-) © Collingwood 21, July 2002

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            05.07.2001 01:28
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            Aspirin drug has had something of a chequered history in the 80+ years it has been around, and is both praised and loathed by many both inside and outside the medical profession. Aspiring is a member of family of drugs known as NSAID's (Non-steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs) and is indicated in a very wide range of conditions. USES PAINKILLING Relief of pain from headaches, period pains, arthritis and other inflammations, it is also a very valuble drug in the reduction of fever associated with infection. BLOOD THINNING Its blood thinning properties are recognised widely amongst the medical profession particularly in the treatment and prevention of heart attacks and strokes. My mum recently had an unexpected heart attack at the relatively young age of 66, and was treated immediately by the paramedics with amongst other things a small dose of this wonderful little drug. There is evidence that given immediately after a heart attack can improve the prognosis for patients. SORE THROATS & TOOTHACHE Many people also don't realise that if you have a sore throat, gargling with aspirin can be useful pain relief, and for severe toothache, if you can stomach its bitter taste, dissolve one on the site of pain for instant relief. MISCARRIAGES It has also been used successfully in low doses for women with a history of miscarriage where the problem has been found to be narrowing of the placenta. PREGNANT WOMEN SHOULD NEVER TAKE ASPIRIN (OR ANY OTHER PAINKILLER WITHOUT SEEKING ADVICE FROM A MEDICAL PRACTITIONER) HOW & WHERE CAN IT BE BOUGHT? It can be purchased in its generic form in 75mg, 300mg and 500mg tabs, and comes in soluble, capsules, tablet and enteric coated tablets. It can be purchased in pack sizes of 16 or less from your local corner shop, supermarkets and garage forecourts or in bigger pack sizes from your local pharmacy. BRANDS It is also marketed unde
            r a range of brand names including Caprin and Nu-seals. COMBINATION PREPARATIONS * Anadin (325mg) combined with caffeine (15mg) to accelerate the effects, (you can get the same effect taking normal aspirin with a drink of coffee or coke if thats all you have available) * Anadin Extra (aspirin 300mg/Paracetamol 200mg) * Codis, which combines 500mg of Aspirin with 8mg of Codeine for when you need something a little stronger. YOU MUST NEVER TAKE THIS DRUG WITH OTHER NSAID'S - this includes ibuprofen, as it will seriously increase the risk of stomach bleeds. PRICES Prices of many of OTC drugs have until recently been standardardised across the industry irrespective of where purchased. However the governments recent change of heart in allowing supermarkets to sell brand name OTCS at less than the recommended price may soon see a reduction in prices in bigger chains, although as yet some supermarkets have yet to respond to this change. Just remember, if you can, support your local pharmacy; they are at risk from this government change, and without them my guess it won't be long before the supermarkets start to raise prices again. DOSAGE 8 x 500mg tablets maximum dose in any 24 hour period, separated into 4 or more doses of no more than 1000mg at any one time with no less than 4 hours between doses, if you can manage longer do it. It is recommended that you take this drug after food as it is less likely to irritate the stomach. Heart attack victims are often advised to take 75mg daily to prevent reoccurrences. There has been a lot of speculation about the safety of taking this drug even at this dose where no symptoms are present. Doctors now advise taking 75mg daily for 14 days prior to a long haul flight, although for healthy indidviduals there is no proof that taking it in other circumstances has any real health benefit and can increase the risk
            of stomach problems and blood that won't clot. WHO SHOULDN'T TAKE IT? * Anyone with an allergy to acetysallics. (spelling?) * Those taking other anticoagulant drugs except under strict medical supervision * CHILDREN UNDER 12 SHOULD NOT TAKE THIS DRUG AS IT CAN CAUSE REYES DISEASE, A RARE BRAIN AND LIVER DISORDER MOST COMMONLY AFFECTING CHILDREN. * Pregnant women. (see above) * Asthma Sufferers. * I would guess haemophiliacs, as aspirin thins the blood. * Aspirin should NEVER be taken for more than 2 days without seeking advice from your doctor, because of the risk of stomach bleeds and ulcers. * If you take this drug on a regular basis and need surgery, check with your doctor to see if you should change your routine. POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS * Stomach problems * rash * Allergy * Ringing in the ears * Breathlessnes * Indigestion * It can be dangerous if taken in overdose and medical attention should be sought immediately. * More superficial bruising * Avoid drinking alcohol when taking it, it will increase the effects of possible stomach problems. DRUG INTERACTIONS * Some drugs used for gout * Anticoagulants * Some oral diabetic drugs * Other NSAID's SUMMARY A very effective little drug with a wide range of uses, I used to swear by it for my toothache, but these days find that even a small dose gives me a bad stomach, and thus I find myself sticking to Ibuprofen which is slightly less harsh (although not perfect) on the stomach. Use with caution and if in doubt speak to your GP or pharmacist who have a wealth of knowledge and will be only too happy to advise. Sue

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              13.04.2001 08:33
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              Aspirin was for a long time the obvious choice as a pain relief (analgesic) tablet, and this is its main use in medicine today. Derived from salicylic acid, this occurs naturally in willow bark, though aspirin today is usually synthetically produced. Due to its bitter taste, ther are variations on the market that make aspirin tablets easier to swallow, such as encasing it in a sugar coating. The extreme bitterness of it means that aspirin can cause irritation to the stomach, and there is some links between aspirin and stomach problems. However, generally aspirin is an excellent choice for the relief of moderate pain, such as headaches (but not migraine), back ache, arthritic complaints and rheumatism. It also reduces the effects of fevers, which means that aspirin is generally as effective and wide-ranging as paracetamol based products. There are additional advantages which are under some dispute. For instance, there is plenty of evidence that aspirin thins the blood, and is often administered immediately someone suffers a heart-attack to reduce the symptoms and complications arising from this. However, many people believe that taking half a tablet a day will also reduce the risk of cardiac problems in the future, and thus can act as a preventative medicine. Whether this is true or not is the subject of some debate. However, a docotr friend of mine takes half a tablet a day and believes that aspirin could in fact be the closest thing we have to a miracle medicine, with the possibility of it also reducing the risk of cancer, particularly colon and rectal cancer. Whilst this is supposition, there are very few side effects to the use of aspirin, meaning that taking half a tablet a day may be worthwhile just in case it really does what some people claim. Given that aspirin is a very cheap medicine to buy, I have now decided to follow my friend's advice, and have started taking the half tablet dose. It should be
              noted that this is only recommended for adults. Indeed, children under 12 should not be given aspirin, as there is some evidence of a link between aspirin in young children and Reye's Syndrome. Either way, aspirin is a good choice as a safe and tested method of pain relief for moderate pain, such as headaches.

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              02.02.2001 16:03
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              ~ ~ I bet there’s one over the counter medicine that’s in most of your bathroom cabinets. I know for sure that it’s in mine, because I use it every day of my life. It’s the simple, straightforward aspirin, which has been around now for over a hundred years. But this medicine that we all take so much for granted is actually useful in ways that I’m fairly sure none of you have ever even imagined or considered. In fact, so many and varied are its therapeutic benefits, that doctors are now starting to consider it as the wonder drug of the old 20th century. HISTORY ~~~~~~ ~ ~ Aspirin as we know it today was invented in 1897 by a German chemist called Felix Hoffmann, who developed it as a treatment for his father’s chronic arthritis. But it’s history could actually be said to have started in the fifth century B.C., when Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, reputedly used ground willow bark for the treatment of aches and pains. The bark of the willow tree contains salicin, which is the base ingredient of the class of drugs called salicylates. By the latter half of the 19th century, salicylates had become the commonly used drug for the treatment of all forms of arthritis, but unfortunately they caused severe irritation to the stomach and digestive system. It was this that prompted Hoffmann to develop a less-irritating medicine for his father, and led to the discovery of synthesised acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and aspirin came into existence. HOW IT WORKS ~~~~~~~~~~~ Arthritis ~ ~ Aspirin is still used today for the purpose for which it was originally invented, namely the treatment of all kinds of arthritis, and is recognised as one of the most effective and least expensive forms of treatment for this extremely common illness. There are in fact well over a hundred different known variations of arthritis, but the most common two a
              re rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis , or degenerative joint disease, is the one that affects most people. It is caused when the cartilage that usually cushions bones becomes worn down over time, thus causing the bones to rub against each other, resulting in severe pain, swelling and restricted movement. Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that can affect a person’s entire body, with acute inflammation of the joint membranes resulting in severe shooting pains, swelling, and stiffness. The exact cause of both these forms of arthritis is not yet fully known, and although age is obviously a factor, it is also a disease which can affect the very young. What aspirin does is to reduce the pain and swelling, and even today, over 100 years after it was first used for this purpose, aspirin is one of the most commonly prescribed remedies for this illness, and a boon to millions of people world-wide. This is the first reason I take aspirin daily, as I suffer from osteoarthritis in my elbows, wrists and hands, caused by over forty years spent tramping the golf fairways of the world. I find it an effective remedy, and coupled with a magnetic bracelet that I wear on my right wrist, I am able to continue playing the sport I love so much. Heart Attacks ~ ~ This is the second common illness that aspirin is prescribed for, and it is in fact the ONLY over-the-counter medication proven without doubt to help people either avoid a heart attack altogether, or to prevent a second attack in people who already suffered one. There is a lot of medical jargon that goes into great detail on how aspirin actually achieves this, but in laymen’s terms, what is does is to thin the blood and prevent clots (a common cause of heart attacks) from forming in the first place. The Federal Drug Authority approved its use in 1996 for use by patients who displayed the classic first signs of a heart attack. It is suggested that
              the person be given 162.5mg (half an ordinary tablet) at the first onset of symptoms, and then taken immediately to seek professional attention. Recent figures show that if this is done, and continued for a thirty-day period, then the risk of death reduces by an incredible 23 percent. It is also commonly used to prevent the formation of platelets which clog the arteries of the heart, and taken regularly can often prevent many people having to go through the now commonly practised heart by-pass operation. If you travel by plane on a regular basis (especially long haul flights) then this can be a very effective way of ensuring you don't become a victim of the newly discovered problem of blood clotting, from which a number of travellers have actually died. ~ ~ A study carried out at Harvard University in 1988 among 22,000 male doctors discovered that those who took a 325mg tablet of aspirin every other day had a 44 percent fewer heart attacks than those who did not. This study was originally designed to be carried out over an eight year period, but so convinced were the researchers of aspirins benefits, that they published their findings after only four years, as they believed it to be unethical to withhold the benefits of aspirin from those in the control group who had been taking a placebo tablet. (New England Journal of Medicine, 7/4/88) As a smoker (I know, I know!) since my early teens, this is the second reason I take aspirin on a daily basis, as smoking is now recognised as being a major contributor in causing heart disease. Pain Relief ~ ~ This is still probably still the most common purpose aspirin is used for. When used properly, aspirin gives quick and effective pain relief for injuries, such as muscle strains, headaches, toothaches, etc. It achieves this by blocking the bodies’ ability to produce a substance called prostaglandins, which are the building blocks of pain. It is estimate
              d that over 90% of people suffer from at least one severe headache a year, usually stress related. Again aspirin is one of the most effective types of treatment, as it reduces the swelling in the head and neck muscles, thus removing the cause of the pain. Next time you reach for that heavily advertised headache or pain remedy, check its actual contents on the side of the box. Many are purely and simply aspirin under another brand name. (eg “Anadin”) COST ~~~~ ~ ~ This is probably one of the most inexpensive drugs on the market. The price of proprietary brands will vary between €0.80 and €6.40, but most are available freely not only in your pharmacy, but over the counter in most small shops, garages, etc. and at your local supermarket. Just check the contents on the side of the box to make sure it is aspirin and not paracetamol that you are buying. Up until a couple of years ago you could go into a chemist and ask for simple “Aspirin B.P.”, which was a non-branded product that sold for about €0.60 for 100 tablets. But obviously the major drug companies have caught on, and are cashing in on its popularity, as this has not been available for a good while now. This is a bit of a rip-off, as you are paying way over the odds for the advertising and packaging on branded products, and getting exactly the same product. The chemist will always tell you that the Aspirin B.P. is out of stock. But for TWO YEARS; come on!!! CONCLUSION ~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ As I was writing this article a song kept coming into my mind, which many of my older readers will possibly remember. It was called “Lily the Pink”, released in the late 1960’s by a group called “The Scaffold” headed by Paul McCartney’s (The Beatles) brother. The chorus to this song went; “We’ll drink a drink a drink, To Lily the Pink, the P
              ink, the Pink, The saviour of the human race, For she invented, Medicinal Compound, Proved efficacious, in every case.” ~ ~ For some reason it kept reminding me of aspirin, the little “wonder drug” that so many of us have in our homes, but which so few truly appreciate. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ WARNING SECTION ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ Due to the number of potential risks and hazards associated with the taking of any drug, and as so many have been (rightly) pointed out to me in the comments section of the opinion, I am adding this section as a rider to the main article. I shall add to this as necessary, in cases of anyone advising me of any further potential problems. From kenjohn It is advisable only to take aspirin on a daily basis after first checking with your family doctor, as it can cause stomach upset in some people. There is a “low dose” tablet available on prescription, which can avoid this side effect. From nikkisly. Aspirin can cause more than 'stomach upsets' - it can actually cause severe bleeding and should be avoided by people with stomach ulcers or any other 'bleeding' problems. Aspirin should not be given to children under 12 in view of it's implication in causing Reye's Syndrome. From sidneygee One new point that you have not mentioned is the recently announced inadvisability of those who are pregnant taking any painkillers. From flossy Something you might not know is that a low dosage aspirin is often given to pregnant women with a history of miscarriage with very encouraging results.

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            • Product Details

              Aspirin Enteric Coated 75mg 56. Please note: A low-strength aspirin, designed for heart patients and/or to prevent blood from clotting and not for use as a painkiller. Packaging may vary.A daily dose of aspirin 75mg can reduce the risk of cancer and prevent the disease from spreading, studies show.