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Live Catch Trip Trap Mouse Trap

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Brand: Other Brands / Misc House Type: Mouse Trap

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
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      18.05.2013 08:59
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      A very good mousetrap for one or two mice

      A few years ago a neighbour moved out and took her menagerie of ducks, chickens, goats and horses with her but she left behind the mice and rats. We got those.

      First it was the mice. Deprived of their daily feed of corn and their comfy beds of hay they looked for somewhere safe to lay their heads. It had to be nice and warm, with plenty of food and no cats. We fitted the bill perfectly and into the house they came. Their droppings went everywhere and it was disgusting. Invasion mice had begun and I had to go to war against them.

      First of all I cleaned like a mad woman and the cleaning cupboard was stuffed with disinfectants and antibacterials. The house has never been so clean. I also threw away all the food that had been chewed, but then I had to face the problem of getting rid of the mice.

      I don't like killing things and the little grey mice were just as entitled to a life as we were so I had to find a humane way of trapping the mice. That was when I bought the humane mousetrap. The first night I set it up and baited it with the traditional cheese. It was quite easy and straightforward to use. You baited the trap, the mouse took the bait and activated the door. The poor little thing was then trapped inside a small plastic space.

      We couldn't sleep. I worried about the mice. What if the trapped mouse died of fright. I'd feel terrible. I know it's daft but I can't help it. After a while I just had to get up and find out if we'd caught a mouse and oh heaven help us we had. It was there in the end of the mousetrap, quivering with fright as the light snapped on. Now what on earth should I do?

      For those who are infested with mice, if you catch them and put them outside they'll come back in the house again. You have to take them a good long way away. I once saw someone take a mouse to end of her long garden and let it go. The mouse promptly scampered all the way back to the house where the dog pounced on it and killed it. No, there was no option. I had to get dressed and deal with the mouse. I took it down to our piece of land which is down a dark and muddy lane. The dog was puzzled but not keen on an extra walk so I left him behind.

      That was one mouse down. Now for the rest. The next morning we had caught another mouse so down the lane it went as well. I hoped they'd be very happy. After several nights of dancing attendance on small furries I was starting to get quite tired with the lack of sleep and the neighbours were talking. It seemed that no matter how many mice I caught there were always ten more to take their place. In theory mice can breed every 25 days and it wouldn't need many breeding females to replace the ones I was evicting. Mice can also do considerable damage. They not only leave droppings everywhere but they urinate as well. They will eat anything they find and they'll chew through everything including electric cables. You can't eat the food that they've chewed and you wouldn't want to. We had to do something.

      I could have gone out and bought ten more of the mousetraps but I wasn't sure this would address the problem. In the end I tackled it in a different way. I literally sealed everything edible into mouseproof containers and waited for the mice to leave. It worked. Within a few days the mice were clearly disgruntled at finding themselves deprived of their free lunch so they packed their bags and left. We haven't seen one since.

      I would say that the mousetrap worked very well and did exactly what it was supposed to do. It would be ideal if you just had the odd mouse to deal with. We had an infestation and using one trap really wasn't effective.

      If you want to get rid of mice the humane way you are better off sealing up their food source.

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        15.05.2013 10:57
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        A Great Mouse Trap

        Around two months ago we moved into a lovely new house. One of the best features of our new home is that we have a massive cellar. Down here it's dry, warm and very spacious. There are big plans for some kind of man cave down there with a pool table and goodness knows what else, although at the moment it's more of a dumping ground for all our odds and ends we haven't yet found a new home for.

        When we first got the house and went down into the cellar we checked for any signs of pests. We live next to a field on one side and a park on the other, so the threat of mice or worse is always going to be an issue. After having a quick look we saw no dropping or anything that would set alarm bells ringing so we were happy we were safe.

        Then last week I went for my usual trip down the old cobblers stairs into the cellar to retrieve something. This time it was a multipack of crisps we had left down there to keep out the way. I had made the mistake of leaving them on the floor and to my dismay the corner of the bag had been shredded by something. I opened up the big bag and inside on of the crisp packets had been broken into, oh dear! Then I did a little more exploring and found that a bag of sweets we had left down there had also been chewed on. Amusingly a little fruit salad chew sweet had been carried to the corner of the room and there devoured by something.

        When I lived with my parents we sometimes had mice in the garage and we once had a rat in the attic. So I was aware of what the droppings looked like. So I went to explore hoping to find small hard little black droppings. To my relief that it was I found. There were no rats down here, only mice. To be honest there are so many places they could have come in from that I didn't know where to start trying to look. So we decided the best option was to get a trap.

        Now I'm not really bothered about mice, I realise they are a pest but to me they are cute little furry things that are more of an irritation that a real worry. I'm certainly not a jump on the table and start screaming kind of person. So I was not interested in one of these snap the mouse's head of kind of traps. Instead we went for the humane version. In fact the name itself suggests it's a mouse friendly trap. So we bought a Live Catch Trip Mouse Trap.

        One of these only costs around £5 so it certainly is not overly expensive. The trap is very easy to work and takes no time at all to set. It comes it two parts so it's easy to bate and the clean after if you need to. The trap works with a simple trim mechanism. So the mouse enters the little tunnel in search of the food at the other end, on it's way along the tunnel it stands on a little bar which release the door behind it. Then it is trapped inside the little tunnel until you come and find it.

        So how successful is the trap? Well we have had it four days and caught four mice! However, once to my amazement I went down to check it and the bate had gone but the door was still open. So that gives it's an 80% success rate which is still pretty good.

        So you might now be wondering what you should use as bate. Well most people would assume cheese, but there are better things you can use. The first night I used a small piece of Twix. This worked no problem. For the last three nights I have used half a Jelly Baby and again, it's worked every time! So it's obvious mice are not overly fussy and you can bate the trap with most things you have lying around the kitchen.

        The next dilemma is getting rid of the mice. One thing to be careful of as a friend of mine did this. Don't forget about the trap. He set his trap and then forgot to check back, two weeks later he noticed an awful smell in his garage. The humane mouse trap had turned into a mini torture chamber for some poor mouse who has starved to death! So make sure you check it every day.

        So how did we dispose of our mice? Well we decided to keep them in a large tub filled with hay. Just for a few days until we had a few and we could take them into the countryside to release them together. Up until yesterday the plan was working a charm. We had three happy little mice cuddled up together in the hay. Then a rather naught rabbit, our I should add decided to be mischievous. Our rabbit is actually called Cheeky Bunny and she lives up to her name. The tub was out in the yard where Cheeky Bunny plays and while we weren't looking she decided to hop on top of the tub and knock the lid off.

        By the time we had gone out two of the mice were gone and the other one was shaking in the corner. Cheeky Bunny got a good telling off and we decided to let the other one go in the field round the back. So now the other two are probably on their way back in search of more Jelly Babies.

        We did catch another mouse this morning so we're going to put him outside in the tub again somewhere out of the rabbit's reach. This time we will make sure we get to take them to the countryside where they can enjoy their life somewhere away from our house.

        One thing we have noticed is how much of a mess the mice make. They are probably scared and so they do a lot of nasty toilet business in the trap while they are there. So naturally you have to clean this out. This is easy to do and when you split the trap in half you can easily rinse it out, so it's a practical trap as well as working well.

        I dread to thing how many mice there may be down in our cellar, but while we have this handy little trap at least we know we are slowly getting rid of them. This is a very good value trap and it obvious works very well. This is one I would highly recommend and one that is so much nicer than the old fashioned spring traps. If you think you may have a mouse problem, then get yourself one of these traps.

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          18.09.2012 11:32
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          Its mouse season

          So you are sleeping away and then you are slowly awoken at the witching hour to that unexpected scratching and nibbling sound. You check yourself and then hone into where exactly it is coming from in the world between sleep and conscious. We hear and see many strange things at night and this is one out of place, the mice gnawing away at the edges of the wooden floorboards and beams to build their winter nest. And you know what that means. Vermin!

          In the 19th century the hamlets turned into small villages and the villages into towns as horse and carts allowed the movement of people and produce to grow the country. But with that came piles and piles of dung washing into the open sewers the streets often were and so disease spread even more, which meant population increase meant more fatalities from those diseases, meaning they had to get rid of the horse drawn carriage, why their was haste to invent the petrol engine. Until 2010 vermin was still on the decrease and in control, until the government pushed to weekly collections, vermin and vermin killers like urban foxes on the rise as those litter bags burst and fermented to reveal a spaghetti pile of maggots, which turn into flies and so more maggots, natures Hoovers. I think we have all staggered back from the pub to see rats scurry across the road and catch those illuminated foxes eyes caught in the headlights.

          So how do we kill these things that nibble at our computer cables? As mice are the only cute animals we want to kill we tend to go for mouse traps over those more devil black industrial fatal rat boxes. You can lay poison around the house, of course, as did I at first, only for a little mouse to stagger out from the airing cupboard where the fluorescent blue poison was, then to keel over in front of me as if in carton as he or she looked at their assassin, and then dropped dead. It was so sad. So from that day onwards it would be the non lethal traps for me, the 'Live Catch Trip Trap' the chosen blunt edged guillotine.

          Mice's only crime, apart from nibbling everything and having an awkward plural, is they are a bit of a pervert and supposed to run up ladies skirts, meaning women will stand on the highest piece of furniture to escape that possibility. If you want to impress a lady in your relationship then get used to killing spiders and mice, Tom & Jerry style. The Hoover is very good for that for the brave and patient. The mice in our house don't bother me but if they chew on electric cables they can burn the house down so they have to be caught before they reproduce.

          The mice catch trap theory is exactly as it says on the box, the mice caught in a tube shaped tunnel with spring loaded trap at one end. The mechanism can not slam down on the mouse as it only activates when the mouse is into the middle of the trap. It's made of plastic with no identifiable metal parts so you can use it outside with no rust issues, measuring around six inches long and two inches wide. Kids won't hurt themselves with these things like they would if they put blue mouse poison in their mouths. It also won't upset your little ones to see a dead mouse in a tray of poison and you can release it together. But most importantly it actually works. I have caught quite a few of the little blighters and safely released them at the top of the garden. Whether I'm catching the same mouse is another debate. If you're on holidays it's when you are most want to need to catch them, and if you do catch one he/she will probably die in the trap though.

          At £3.99 in high street DIY chains and far less in discount stores they are a cheap and effective way to catch that mouse chewing away at your floorboards and not kill the poor mouse, who, lets face it, is just setting home in the warm to have babies, as all mums-to-be do. And if you like to keep mice as pets then ideal for a free mouse or two! What food you use to get the mouse near to the trap is up to you although I'm told cheese doesn't actually work. I used peanut butter, the best use for the disgusting product.

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            15.09.2012 00:08
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            This is an easy way to catch mice with the least distress.

            I'm so pleased with this mouse trap that I've just got to review it. I bought it this afternoon after spotting an uninvited house guest last night- I mean why would you want to escape out of the opened back door when you can disappear under a cabinet, and then taunt people by running past them when they least expect it? you never know what havoc they're going to create with their nibbling so it had to go. I could never kill anything (and in any case the kids wouldn't allow it!) so off I went in search of a humane trap, needing one straight away I couldn't get one on-line so had to go into town. Bevans had one for £4.99.

            The 'Trip Trap' comes in a red box it tells us what it is and what it's for, it says it's a 'simple way to humanely catch mice'.

            After taking the plastic trap out of it's box I had a look at it, it's very simple- the quality is adequate, can't see it breaking even if used a lot. It isn't very big about 15cm long and 5cm wide. There are instructions on the back, it's straight forward enough- 'Detach the bait section by squeezing the side of the main trap section, place the bait in the trap and push the two sections back together, put the trap against a wall and then open the entrance flap'. I didn't bother I just dropped the bait (bread) in through the 'flap'. I put the trap under the bath as the bathroom was the last sighting, then lifted the entrance flap up and waited. When a mouse runs in the trap the flap closes behind it, with the plastic being clear you can see when the trap has caught something, also you can hear the mouse scrambling around.

            This was a success within two hours. The mouse was unharmed and didn't seem distressed in fact it carried on eating while we walked down the road to release it into the field- easy I just opened the flap and off it went. The mouse left a mess in the trap, crumbs etc, but a quick rinse out has left it as good as new.

            The instructions tell you to check the trap every two hours to minimise distress and release the mouse at-least a quarter of a mile away from your house.

            I would recommend this in a flash.
            5 stars from me.

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              23.10.2009 12:23
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              This is a very effective mouse trap and is easy to use.

              The patter of tiny feet are once again to be heard in the Eco-Mum household - unfortunately it's a mouse!

              Over the last couple of years we have had a problem with the occasional mouse taking up residence in our house. There seems to be a colony living in the alleyway at the end of our garden. We have tried many traps and this is the only one I would recommend.

              It is a humane trap that catches the mouse without injuring it. I wouldn't want to deal with the results of the other sort and if you use poison they just crawl off somewhere inaccessible to die, and I wouldn't want to deal with that either.

              It is clear plastic so you can see at a glance if you have caught anything. You have to check humane traps at least once a day. I also find it actually makes me less 'girlie' about the mouse. When you can see how tiny it is and how scared it is you just feel sorry for it.

              Put the trap near to where you have seen or heard the mouse. Position it next to the wall as mice tend to stick to the edges of rooms as much as possible. Preferably put it somewhere dark (behind a cupboard or fridge for example) so that the mouse feels more secure and is then more likely to go into the trap.

              The mouse enters the trap in search of the bait you have put at the end. Chocolate and peanut butter seem to work better than cheese. The end section comes away for easy cleaning. As the mouse enters it dislodges a flap which then seals the entrance trapping the mouse inside. Some other traps work by the weight of the mouse rocking the trap and that then brings a cap down over the end to seal the trap. We have found these don't work very well on uneven floors or carpet.

              To release the mouse take it to a park or somewhere away from other houses if possible. Make sure this is quite a distance from your house. According to my mother-in-law mice have a homing instinct and will find their way back and she is insistent that the only way to deal with them is to kill them. We take them to the other side of a large park and they would have to negotiate train tracks and several roads to come back. Put the trap on the ground and pull up the flap. The mouse will be nervous for a couple of minutes but will then make a sudden bolt into the nearest shrubbery.

              We think our last mouse must have been caught in a trap before as a couple of times we watched it get near the trap and then suddenly veer away from it. We dealt with this one in the end by waiting until it was behind a bookcase in a corner of the room. We then 'fenced off' the corner using a sheet of kitchen foil and gradually removed everything else from that space until only the mouse was left. My husband then put a plastic pet tank over the mouse, slid a piece of plywood underneath and the mouse was trapped. If it had just been me I would probably have put the trap in with the mouse and hoped it would eventually give up and go into it. Mice don't like going near or climbing kitchen foil and it makes a lot of noise if they do attempt to get over it so it works well as a barrier.

              We haven't tried the ultrasonic mouse repellents as we have pet gerbils. We do have an ultrasonic cat scarer in the garden to stop the neighbours' cats digging up our flowerbeds and that definitely works. However I would worry that you were just moving the mouse around the house rather than getting rid of it?

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                12.02.2009 14:44
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                Highly recommended

                I love animals and can't bear to see them hurt. This includes mice. Yes, even mice that are in my house and shouldn't be! In all the years since I left home I never had a mouse problem until a few years ago when my partner and I moved into our current house. We have 2 capable cats but these mice were under the floorboards and wouldn't come out.

                My partner doesn't have any qualms about using the normal mouse traps that kill mice and he placed some under the floor ignoring my protests. Several dead mice later we were still hearing lots of scratching in the night so he put more traps down. This is where the story gets ugly.

                One trap went off and was then followed by lots of banging and clattering. Clearly the mouse didn't die instantly and it was just awful, I couldn't bring myself to go and look and had to leave it to my partner and I just couldn't stop thinking about how much pain that poor little mouse must have been in so I put my size 5's down and told him no more traps until we have a humane one.

                I found my Trip Trap Mouse Trap on ebay a few years ago and I paid about £3.50 for it but I've recently seen them in Boyes for £2.49 so they are readily available and inexpensive.

                The trap is made of plastic and looks as the picture above. The back section is where you place the bait and this can be removed for washing by squeezing the main section together and pulling the back part off. Inside the main section there is a piece of plastic and some airholes along the side. The door at the front rests on top of the piece of plastic and as the mouse wanders over it to get to the bait it releases the door so said mouse is trapped.

                Obviously this trap will only hold one mouse at a time but you can buy some that hold several. Once you have your little mouse safely inside the trap you transport him/her a couple of miles away from your home, any closer and they return like homing pigeons, open the door and let the mouse go. Simple and humane.

                So we bought one of these, used chocolate as bait, and placed it under the floorboards and waited. I knew we'd caught a mouse because I could hear it scratching inside the trap and my boys had gathered over the place where the trap was desperate to get to it! I lifted the boards up and sure enough a mouse was in the trap.

                Chocolate is a good form of bait as they love it but be warned they will shred it and get it all over the inside of the trap, and I mean all over! They will also pee and poop in there if they spend more than a few minutes in the trap so the trap itself can get messy! To clean the trap just remove the back section, the piece of plastic that triggers the door can be taken out by wiggling the protruding bits of plastic out of the holes at the side and the whole lot can be dunked in warm soapy water. Dry thoroughly and reset.

                Over the next few weeks we caught several mice, some even very young but don't do what we did and get tempted to keep the young ones in a box because it's cold outside! They chew their way out and then you have to re-catch them!! My partner would go off to work each day with a mouse as company and release it a few miles away from home then bring the trap back for me to wash and reset and we continued with this until they'd all gone.

                Since then we've had mice every year, we live out in the sticks so mice are a regular occurrence, and we always use this humane trap to catch them and release them unless my lads (cats) get to them first. It's much better for the mice and my conscience.

                I thoroughly recommend these traps to anyone who doesn't like to kill mice. You do need to empty the trap daily or the mouse will panic and die but it's a small price to pay to get the mice out of your home without hurting them. Inexpensive. effective and totally humane.

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              • Product Details

                The safe and friendly way to deal with unwanted house guests. This British-designed and manufactured product has been especially developed to cause the least stress and no harm to mice when they are caught.